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Local Knowledge

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Cultural Anthropology, Humanities 102 and Sociology
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Josefino Tulabing Larena, AB, CPE, CPS,MPA

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Local Knowledge

  1. 1. Local Knowledge Josefino Tulabing Larena CPS,MPA
  2. 2. Objectives • Local Knowledge is developed over time by people living in a given community, and is continuously developing . • Knowledge systems are dynamic, people adapt to changes in their environment and absorb and assimilate ideas from a variety of sources. • Knowledge and access to knowledge are not spread evenly are not spread evenly through a community.
  3. 3. WHAT IS LOCAL KNOWLEDGE? Local knowledge is the knowledge that people in a given community have developed over time, and continue to develop. It is: • Based on experience • Often tested over centuries of use • Adapted to the local culture and environment • Embedded in community practices, institutions, relationships and rituals • Held by individuals or communities • Dynamic and changing
  4. 4. Local knowledge • The term local knowledge seems least biased in terms of its contents or origin. As it embraces a larger body of knowledge systems, it includes those classified as traditional and indigenous.
  5. 5. The concept of Local knowledge • Indigenous knowledge systems are often associated with indigenous people thus rather limiting for policies, projects and programmed seeking to work with rural farmers in general.
  6. 6. The concept of Local knowledge • traditional knowledge implies that people living in rural areas are isolated from the rest of the world and that their knowledge systems are static and do not interact with other knowledge systems. Picture Falls in Barangay Pinocawan in Vallehermoso, Negros Oriental.
  7. 7. The concept of Local knowledge • Common knowledge is held by most people in a community; e.g. almost everyone knows how to cook rice (or the local staple food).
  8. 8. The concept of Local knowledge • Shared knowledge is held by many, but not all, community members; e.g. villagers who raise livestock will know more about basic animal husbandry than those without livestock.
  9. 9. The concept of Local knowledge • Specialized knowledge is held by a few people who might have had special training or an apprenticeship; e.g. only few villagers will become healers, midwives, or blacksmiths.
  10. 10. WHY IS LOCAL KNOWLEDGE IMPORTANT? • Significant contributions to global knowledge have originated with local people, It is passed down from generation to generation and closely interwoven with people’s cultural values.
  11. 11. Key Points • Local knowledge is developed over time by people living in a given community, and is continuously developing.
  12. 12. • Knowledge and access to knowledge are not spread evenly through a community or between communities; people have different objectives, interests, perceptions, beliefs and access to information and resources.
  13. 13. • Knowledge systems are dynamic, people adapt to changes in their environment and absorb and assimilate ideas from a variety of sources.
  14. 14. • The type of knowledge people have is related to their age, gender, occupation, labor division within the family, enterprise or community, socio-economic status, their experience, environment, history.
  15. 15. • Local knowledge is the human capital of the rural and urban people, it is the main asset they invest in the struggle for survival, to produce food, provide for shelter or achieve control of their own lives.
  16. 16. UNESCO SYSTEM LINKS • 'Local and indigenous knowledge' refers to the cumulative and complex bodies of knowledge, know-how, practices and representations that are maintained and developed by peoples with extended histories of interactions with the natural environment. These cognitive systems are part of a complex that also includes language, attachment to place, spirituality and worldview. Many different terms are used to refer to this knowledge, these include:traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) • indigenous knowledge (IK) • local knowledge • rural peoples'/ farmers' knowledge • ethnobiology / ethnobotany / ethnozoology • ethnoscience • folk science • indigenous science
  17. 17. • For those involved in research and development processes, with local communities, it is important to see local knowledge as one component within a more complex innovation system.
  18. 18. Threat of local Knowledge
  19. 19. Threat of local Knowledge
  20. 20. Use local brands as Examples
  21. 21. Topic for local Knowledge Research • Making an article for 1,000 words of your local knowledge research. • Some of the topic suggestions in the next slides
  22. 22. Native Food
  23. 23. Religious Life
  24. 24. Local culture
  25. 25. Historical Structure
  26. 26. Street life
  27. 27. Local life
  28. 28. People Inangta sa Siaton Siaton Festival
  29. 29. Heritage Houses
  30. 30. Foreign culture in the place
  31. 31. Forbidden Love Douglas MacArthur Isabella Rosario Elizabeth Cooper
  32. 32. Natural Life
  33. 33. THE INDIGENOUS PEOPLE OF CAROL-AN
  34. 34. Music of the local people
  35. 35. Photo Credits • Mr .Mike Ocampo • Mr. Penn Larena, MPA • Mr. Jojo Larena • www.google.com • www.yahoo.com • Nica Belnas • Janica Tan • St. Paul University Dumaguete
  36. 36. Thank you

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