Successful change is about                                                          the who rather than the               ...
Sentiment analysis    BSG has created an in-house tool to help monitor, manage and communicate change. This ensures that t...
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Successful change is about the who, rather than the what, why or how

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Successful change is about the who, rather than the what, why or how

  1. 1. Successful change is about the who rather than the why, what or how A change that meets 80% of requirements, but is 100% embedded in the business will deliver more benefit than a change that meets 100% of requirements, but is not embedded in the business. In order to embed the change, stakeholders need to feel a sense of engagement from its inception all the way through to delivery. While the message and the way it’s communicated are important, if stakeholders are neglected during the change implementation, they will feel disconnected, less engaged and potentially hostile. Proactively involving stakeholders throughout the change journey will enable the organisation to build a case for change throughout the project rather than foist it on the organisation as the final steps of implementing new business processes or software. THE BSG (UK) APPROACH Change is implemented by people – not process models, marketing brochures or training courses. A change approach which is stakeholder centric, while still addressing relevant contextual considerations, has a far greater chance of being embedded successfully. Merely focusing on designing the change well and rolling out the communications is not enough. Stakeholder analysis, on-going sentiment tracking and associated interventions are at the cornerstone of a successful change implementation. Stakeholders’ experience of change It is only human that people’s first reaction to change is often “What will it mean for me?” A stakeholder centric approach recognises this response and provides What does this reasonable and relevant answers to help stakeholders change mean respond positively to the change. for me? How does this align to Is it good for What will What is the change design? the organisation’s What will be my job grade be? strategy? the company? happen? Who will I be working with? Do I have the skills and Am I involved What communications am IWill my company prepare ability to do in the change receiving? me for the change? what will be and can I Is there a feedback loop to expected of influence it? the project team? me? How can I be successful? © Business Systems Group (UK), Registered in England No. 6150570, 230 City Road, London, EC1V2TT www.bsgdelivers.com
  2. 2. Sentiment analysis BSG has created an in-house tool to help monitor, manage and communicate change. This ensures that the project team are able to monitor sentiment across stakeholder communities and design the appropriate interventions as and when required. Ability to influence How important is Score other stakeholders the stakeholders Stakeholder Attitude to Change (1 = Low, 2 = buy-in for the (To inform areas of Medium, 3 = High) project? specific concern) dd/mm/yy dd/mm/yy dd/mm/yy Name Attribute a rating of positive or negative about the project e.g. Brian Welsh + 3 3 9 e.g. Robert Walters -- 1 1 3 e.g. Jack Johnson ++ 2 3 6 BSG’s sentiment analysis tool. Often, projects are afraid to engage stakeholders until the design is finalised and every detail is ironed out. Not only does it increase risk because of the element of surprise at implementation time, it also reduces the ability for experienced practitioners in the stakeholder community to provide input to the design, input which could be fundamental to the success of the project. This does not mean we can ignore the traditional tools of change management. It is vital to ensure that the change is aligned to organisational strategy, that there are on-going communications and that training is made available. In all cases though, these tools should be considered in the context of how they affect stakeholder communities. They’re a means to an end rather than the end itself. BENEFITS OF THE BSG (UK) APPROACH • Converts make the best advocates. The use of sentiment analysis tools means that the project understands how stakeholders’ perceptions have changed over time. Hopefully, stakeholders who are sceptical at the outset will ultimately become receptive and maybe even excited about the change. Asking these stakeholders to become advocates gives the change more credibility. • Change is socialised throughout the design project. Change doesn’t happen immediately. Typically there will be a project which designs the change (new processes, new software, etc.) and this will take some time. Throughout the design cycle, there are opportunities to socialise the change and engage stakeholders. • The response of stakeholder communities can be predicted. The project team works closely with the relevant stakeholder groups involved in the change. Sentiment is assessed and monitored as the project team designs and builds the change. This means that we are able to predict more accurately how stakeholder groups are going to react to the change and respond accordingly. www.bsgdelivers.comFor more information about our service offering, +44 20 7390 8674please visit our website or contact us busdev@bsguk.co.uk © Business Systems Group (UK), Registered in England No. 6150570, 230 City Road, London, EC1V2TT www.bsgdelivers.com

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