Seven Steps of Criminal Justice
1: The Incident <ul><li>Someone commits a crime </li></ul><ul><li>The crime is reported by a witness </li></ul><ul><li>The...
2: Charges <ul><li>The police can question the suspect for up to 72 hours </li></ul><ul><li>Afterwards, the police can ask...
3: Remand <ul><li>The accused will go to a magistrates court where the solicitor can ask for bail </li></ul><ul><li>If bai...
4: Preparing for Court <ul><li>The accused and their lawyer write down exactly what they say happened </li></ul><ul><li>Th...
5: The Magistrates Court <ul><li>Most people now appear here </li></ul><ul><li>There isn’t a jury </li></ul><ul><li>Judges...
6: The Crown Court <ul><li>The more serious crimes are dealt with here </li></ul><ul><li>There are 12 people to act as a j...
7: The Sentence <ul><li>Only the most serious crimes get a prison sentence </li></ul><ul><li>This is because our prisons a...
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Seven Steps Of Criminal Justice (Jack Walker)

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Seven Steps Of Criminal Justice (Jack Walker)

  1. 1. Seven Steps of Criminal Justice
  2. 2. 1: The Incident <ul><li>Someone commits a crime </li></ul><ul><li>The crime is reported by a witness </li></ul><ul><li>The police take statements </li></ul><ul><li>The police find out about a suspect and if they think that they are guilty, they make an arrest </li></ul>
  3. 3. 2: Charges <ul><li>The police can question the suspect for up to 72 hours </li></ul><ul><li>Afterwards, the police can ask for </li></ul><ul><li>more time, release the suspect or </li></ul><ul><li>charge them </li></ul><ul><li>If charged, they will be sent to a magistrates court </li></ul>
  4. 4. 3: Remand <ul><li>The accused will go to a magistrates court where the solicitor can ask for bail </li></ul><ul><li>If bail is given they can go free until the trial, but with limitations e.g. they have to stay indoors at certain times </li></ul><ul><li>If not, they will remain locked up until the trial </li></ul>
  5. 5. 4: Preparing for Court <ul><li>The accused and their lawyer write down exactly what they say happened </li></ul><ul><li>The police help witnesses write down what they say happened </li></ul><ul><li>The CPS gather all of this evidence together and decide if it is enough to prove that they are guilty </li></ul>
  6. 6. 5: The Magistrates Court <ul><li>Most people now appear here </li></ul><ul><li>There isn’t a jury </li></ul><ul><li>Judges decide the verdict </li></ul><ul><li>The defendant claims “Guilty” or “Not Guilty” </li></ul><ul><li>If they claim “Guilty”, the magistrates decide on a punishment </li></ul><ul><li>If they claim “Not Guilty” the CPS states why they are guilty </li></ul>
  7. 7. 6: The Crown Court <ul><li>The more serious crimes are dealt with here </li></ul><ul><li>There are 12 people to act as a jury </li></ul><ul><li>They decide (having heard both sides of the story) whether the defendant is guilty or not guilty </li></ul><ul><li>At least 10 have to agree </li></ul>
  8. 8. 7: The Sentence <ul><li>Only the most serious crimes get a prison sentence </li></ul><ul><li>This is because our prisons are too full to take many more people </li></ul><ul><li>Everyone else gets community service or a fine </li></ul>

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