1. leak 2. slick 3. floating 4. barrier 5. disaster 6 ....doc

313 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
313
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

1. leak 2. slick 3. floating 4. barrier 5. disaster 6 ....doc

  1. 1. e-lesson Week starting: May 17, 2010 1. An environmental disaster? This week’s lesson is about the ongoing environmental emergency caused by a huge oil spill off the southern coast of the United States, following an explosion on an oil rig on April 20. Level Pre-intermediate and above (equivalent to CEF level A2−B1 and above) How to use the lesson 1. Ask your students if they can think of any examples of environmental disasters caused by humans that have taken place anywhere in the world. Introduce the subject of the recent oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico (if the students have not already mentioned it), and collect as much information about it as possible from the students. Do your students think such accidents are avoidable or that they are bound to happen from time to time? Ask them to justify their answers. 2. Before doing Exercise 1, you need to cut copies of Worksheet C into two halves. Divide the class into two groups, A and B. Give one copy of Worksheet A to each student in Group A, along with the corresponding part of Worksheet C; and one copy of Worksheet B to each student in Group B, along with the corresponding part of Worksheet C. 3. Tell your students they have the same text on the oil spill, but that different information is missing from each worksheet. Explain that they are going to ask a member of the other group some questions to help them complete the text, but first they need to prepare the questions. 4. Give the students at least ten minutes to read through the text and check any new vocabulary, then give them at least another ten minutes to work together in their groups to prepare and write down the questions they need to ask in order to complete the text. Monitor this activity to make sure that the students are formulating the questions correctly (see suggestions below) and provide prompts if necessary. 5. When all the students have prepared their questions, divide them into pairs so that each student from Group A is working with a student from Group B. They should take turns asking and answering the questions they have prepared and writing the answers in the spaces in the text. Tell students not to look at their partner’s text. 6. When both students are finished asking and answering, allow them to compare worksheets. Then check answers in open class. You could also hand out copies of Worksheet E, which contains the full version of the text. 7. Divide the students into pairs, and hand out worksheet D (there is a different worksheet for Student A and B) so that Student A’s crossword has the words that Student B’s is missing, and vice versa. The idea is for the students to describe the words they have in their crosswords so that their partners can guess what they are, and then fill them in. It is therefore vital that they don’t show their crosswords to their partners. Tell the students to describe the words one by one, and to take turns speaking. You could let the students continue describing the words for as long as it takes for their partners to identify them, or as a fun alternative you could impose a time limit for This page has been downloaded from www.insideout.net It is photocopiable, but all copies must be complete pages. Copyright © Macmillan Publishers, S. A. de C.V. 2010
  2. 2. the description of each word. Before the students begin, point out that all the missing words feature in the text on Worksheet A. 8. Check answers in open class. This page has been downloaded from www.insideout.net It is photocopiable, but all copies must be complete pages. Copyright © Macmillan Publishers, S. A. de C.V. 2010
  3. 3. Answers: Exercise 1 (Suggested questions, with answers in parentheses) 1. Where is the oil spill? (in the Gulf of Mexico) 2. When did the explosion happen? (on April 20) 3. Where did the explosion happen? (on an oil rig) 4. Where was the oil rig drilling for oil? (under the seabed) 5. How many workers were killed in the explosion? (eleven) 6. When did the oil rig sink? (two days later) 7. How many liters of oil have been leaking into the ocean every day? (around 800,000) 8. Where is the broken oil well? (on the seabed) 9. What is the name of the company in charge of the rig? (British Petroleum) 10. What does President Obama say BP has to do? (stop the leak) 11. How big is the oil slick? (more than 5,000 square kilometers) 12. Where has some of the oil already reached? (the Louisiana coast) 13. What could the oil slick cause along the coast? (very bad pollution) 14. What could the oil slick have serious consequences for? (the fishing and tourism industries) 15. What could the oil kill a huge number of? (seabirds and other wild animals) 16. What is BP trying to put around the broken well? (a large metal container) 17. Why is it difficult to put the container around the well? (because it is so far underwater) 18. What have been put on the surface of the ocean? (floating barriers) 19. What does “offshore (oil wells)” mean? (it means [oil wells] in the ocean near the coast) 20. What did President Obama say after the accident? (that there should be no new offshore drilling) Exercise 2 1. leak 2. slick 3. floating 4. barrier 5. disaster 6. tourism 7. container 8. surface 9. well 10. consequences 11. drill 12. sink 13. underwater 14. seabird If the crossword has been completed correctly, Alabama and Florida will read from top to bottom. 2. Related Websites Send your students to these websites, or just take a look yourself. http://videos.nola.com/times-picayune/2010/05/oil_spill_video_bob_marshall_g.html A four-minute video update from the Louisiana Times-Picayune news editor on the oil spill (May 12). Challenging for pre-intermediate level. http://www.deepwaterhorizonresponse.com/go/site/2931/ The official website of the spill cleanup operation, with lots of pictures and video clips. Accessible to pre-intermediate level. http://www.nasa.gov/topics/earth/features/oilspill/index.html Satellite pictures of the spill from NASA, with links to related articles. Accessible to pre- intermediate level. This page has been downloaded from www.insideout.net It is photocopiable, but all copies must be complete pages. Copyright © Macmillan Publishers, S. A. de C.V. 2010
  4. 4. http://www.epa.gov/gmpo/about/facts.html General information about the Gulf of Mexico, from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) website. Challenging for pre-intermediate level. This page has been downloaded from www.insideout.net It is photocopiable, but all copies must be complete pages. Copyright © Macmillan Publishers, S. A. de C.V. 2010

×