Using hands on activities in the science classroom

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This is a tutorial about ways to incorporate more hands on science actvities in your classroom. It was designed with a specific school in mind, but can be applied to any school. Hands on activities encourage higher level thinking and more student engagement.

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  • Title page. Font is Century Gothic 80, color blue. Background light blue. Green next/back button on every page for navigation.
  • Instructional goal of the lesson. This explains how the teachers will be assessed throughout the tutorial. Blue text on blue background. Green next/back button for navigation. Title font Century Gothic 28, all other Century Gothic 15. Clipart “Goals” picture.
  • Introduces the objectives for the lesson and how the teacher will be assessed, in sequential order. Title font is Century Gothic 54, all other is Century Gothic 17. Clipart picture of teacher on left hand side. Green next/back arrows for navigation.
  • A 30 minute video about why teaching science is important. Teachers will be able to click on the link and the video will play. Title font is Century Gothic 54. Green next/back button for navigation.
  • This slide contains links to two, one minute videos about using hands on science tools in the classroom. Title font is Century Gothic 28, all other is 17pt. Green back/next buttons.
  • A quick formative assessment to determine if the teachers can choose which of the above examples is a hands-on activity. Teachers click on the speaker to hear hand claps if correct, buzzer if incorrect sounds. Title font is Century Gothic 36pt, all other is 24 pt. Green next/back buttons for navigation.
  • The links will lead to articles that discuss the benefits of using hands on activities in the classroom. Title font is Century Gothic 54, all other is 24. Green next/back arrows for navigation.
  • Title font is Century Gothic 54, all other is 24pt. Green next/back button for navigation. This slide introduces some concepts the teachers will need to be familiar with in order to successfully incorporate hands-on activities in the classroom.
  • Title font is Century Gothic 54 pt., all other is 24 pt. Green next/back buttons fro navigation. This slide discusses why it is important for the students to work in groups, and contains a link to an article about group work.
  • Title font is Century Gothic 54, all other is 24 point.
  • This slide contains a sample lesson plan for a hands-on activity to demonstrate contrasting elements and compounds, and how molecules are formed. Title font is Century Gothic 28 point, lesson plan is Century Gothic 12. Title is located in a text box beneath the lesson plan.
  • A quick formative assessment to determine if the teachers can identify which of the above scenarios could be part of a lesson plan. Title is century Gothic 44 point, all other font is Century gothic 24 point. Clicking on the speaker will allow the teacher to hear hand claps for a correct answer and a buzzer for an incorrect answer.
  • Title is Century Gothic 54 point, all other is 24 point. Green next/back buttons for navigation.
  • Title font is Century Gothic 54 point, text is located in a text box and is Century gothic 18. The pictures show various examples of room arrangements for a hands on science classroom.
  • Title is Century gothic 54 point, all other text is Century Gothic 24 point. The links contain articles on setting up a classroom to accommodate hands on science activities. The picture shows two students working together on a science experiment.
  • Title is Century gothic 54 point, all other text is Century gothic 24 point. The slide discusses three areas from which a teacher may find materials such as beakers, balances and other equipment for use in hands on science experiments.
  • Title is Century Gothic 53 point, all other text is century gothic 20. The slide discusses several good starting places to begin searching for activities.
  • Title is Century Gothic 54 point, all other text is Century Gothic 24 point. Clicking on the link will take the teacher to a new website that has ideas for using science in the classroom.
  • Using hands on activities in the science classroom

    1. 1. Using Hands-On Activities in the Science Classroom Rebecca Hardner
    2. 2. Goals of this lesson Teachers will be able to implement hands-on, inquirybased learning activities in the classroom using the science curriculum and planningguide and materials providedby the district or other source,at least three times a week by December 2012. This will beassessed by the administration through lesson plans and classroom visits.
    3. 3. Sequential Objectives • Teachers will view the web based tutorial in September and be able to successfully incorporate 1 hands on activity in their classroom 4 out of the 5 weeks in October. • Teachers will continue to have access to the web based tutorial for review purposes and will implement at least 2 hands on activities in the classroom 3 out of the 4 weeks in November. • Teachers will continue to have access to materials and websites from the tutorial and will include at least 3 hands on activities of their choice each week in December.
    4. 4. Why Teach Science?Click on the link below to watch a video on the importance of teaching science. http://vimeo.com/3531977
    5. 5. http://www.ehow.com/ What arevideo_4974405_types- hands-onteaching-aids.html science activities? • Learning by doing • Involves the student in the total learning processhttp://www.ehow.com/ • Encourages higher level thinkingvideo_4974402_reviewin • Engages the learner Reaches multipleg-science-teaching- • learning styles at oncesupplies.html • Differentiates
    6. 6. Which of the following is a hands-on activity?1. Watching a video on how matter changes from one form to another.2. Students moving through stations and manipulating ice as it changes states of matter.3. Looking at pictures of scientific tools.4. Students handling different scientific tools and determining how they might be used.
    7. 7. Why use hands-on activities?• Fun • Click on the links below to read an article on why to use• Creativity hands on activities.• Retention• Accomplishment http://www.squidoo.com /top-6-reasons-hands-on-• Review projects• Cooperation http://www.ehow.com/in fo_8255645_use-hands- activities-motivate- students.html
    8. 8. Getting Started • How do I get the students to work in groups? • What will my lesson plan look like? • Should I change the room arrangement? • What materials are available to me? • Where do I find ideas?
    9. 9. How do I get the students to work in groups?• Science lends itself to collaboration• Students learn from one another when they work together• All students are engaged in the learning processhttp://www.ncrel.org/sdrs/areas/issues/content/cntareas/science/eric/eric-7.htm
    10. 10. What will my lesson plan look like?• Teachers will act as a facilitator- less teaching more walking around the room and asking questions• Let the students dictate the learning-learn through inquiry and experimentation• There are NO wrong answers• Below is a link on tips for planning:http://www.reachoutmichigan.org/funexperiments/voltips.html
    11. 11. INP/MOD: TTW say, “All matter is made up of atoms and molecules. Molecules are made up of two or more atoms (draw an example of O2 on the board). This is an element because it only has the element oxygen in it, but it has two atoms of oxygen (explain that the number tells you how many of each atom). When two elements combine they form a compound, like water (draw H2O on the board). This contains two atoms of hydrogen and 1 atom of oxygen-two different elements.”GP TTW pass out the Marshmallow Matter page, colored marshmallows and toothpicks. TTW read the directions aloud. TTW walk the class through creating a water molecule using two red marshmallows (hydrogen) and one white marshmallow (oxygen). TTW walk around the room and help as needed as the students complete the worksheet. TTW ask the following questions as he/she moves through the room: 1. What is the difference between an element and a compound? 2. Can you show me an element? A compound? 3. What do the different colors of marshmallows represent?IP TSW build models of molecules and compounds using marshmallows.C Compare and contrast atoms and molecules Sample Lesson Plan
    12. 12. Which of the following will be in your lesson plan?1. Students will read pages XYZ and answer questions on page Z to turn in.2. Students will identify the correct instrument and use it to measure the mass, length and volume of several given objects and record the information in their science journals.3. Students will move through stations and manipulate ice through the three states of matter.4. Students will complete the attached worksheetand turn it in for a grade.
    13. 13. Should I change my room arrangement?• Group seating arrangements work particularly well for science classrooms and lab work, but may also be an efficient setup if you have your students work regularly in small groups. Set up your desk or work area in the center or front of the room; your role as a facilitator and monitor is important and youll be away from your desk when utilizing this classroom arrangement because youll be checking in with each group. Group desks together in groups of four or five throughout the classroom, leaving space in between them to facilitate group communication and movement around the room
    14. 14. Sample RoomArrangements All of these arrangements encourage collaboration and group work.
    15. 15. Articles on Room Arrangement • Click on the links below to read articles on setting up a classroom to accommodate hands on science • http://www.ehow.com /how_6928715_design- ideal-classroom- arrangement.html • http://nstacommunities .org/blog/2010/08/14/c lassroom-seating- arrangements/
    16. 16. What materials are available?• Check the library- there are many items available from the science department for use (microscopes, weather instruments, videos, beakers, balances, etc.)• Share resources with other teachers (check with other teachers in the building-many have equipment and are willing to share)• Call the science department or speak to the school science chair if you need something specific-it may be available for loan
    17. 17. Where do I get ideas? • Collaborate with teachers in your building • Attend district professional development opportunities • Collaborate with the head of your science department • Meet with your school assigned science specialist • Check out the library-lots of videos and books to help you get started • Google and the World Wide Web
    18. 18. Links to Good Science WebsitesBelow are some really good science websites. Youcan always tailor an activity to meet the needs ofyour students.http://www.stevespanglerscience.com/http://www.exploratorium.edu/explore/http://www.siemensscienceday.com/activities/hands-on-science-activities.cfmhttp://www.spacegrant.hawaii.edu/class_acts/http://www.kids-science-experiments.com/index.htmlhttp://www.all-science-fair-projects.com/
    19. 19. Certificate This is to certify that ___________________________ completed the web basedtutorial entitled “Using Hands on Activities in the Classroom” successfully. Please print this certificate and turn it in to the administration no later than October 1, 2012.

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