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Samantha	Pattridge
Hannah	Peters
Analysis	of	UFV	Student	Learning	Patterns:
Ratio	of	Instructor-Directed	(In-Class)	to	Ind...
• Introductions
• Project	details
• Findings
• Implications	and	discussion
Discipline-specific	(e.g.	Bonesronning &	Opstad,	2012;	Bower,	2012;	Scully	&	
Kerr,	2014;	Ruiz-Gallardo,	Castano,	Gomez-Al...
Survey	Details
• Ethics	approval
• Structure:	
• Pilot	followed	by	full	study
• Two	surveys	per	term
• Faculty	survey
• Cl...
Overall	Findings
• Survey	1	mean:	4.63	hours/week
• Survey	2	mean:	5.16	hours/week
14
79
122
102
92
75
49
18
27
9
21
40
0
...
Findings	by	Faculty
5.47
6.11
4.77
6.30 6.13
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Health Humanities Professional	
Studies
Science Social	
Scien...
Findings	by	Delivery	Format
• Poor	response	rate	from	
online	and	hybrid	(n=32)
• 7	of	19	sections	
represented
• Mean	of	...
Findings	by	Student	Year
5.38
4.52 4.50
5.41
6.22
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
0	to	30 30	to	60 60	to	90 90	to	120 120+
Average	Number	...
Faculty	Expectations vs.	Student	Reports
0
2
8
7
5
1 1
7
0
2
0
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 More
Number	of	Fac...
Faculty	Expectations vs.	Student	Reports
6
32
72
91
68
56
38
20 24
16
25
49
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
100
0 1 2 3 4 5 6...
1. Did	any	results	in	this	
study	surprise	you?	Why?
2. Considering	the	amount	
of	time	students	report	
spending	on	cours...
Moving	Forward
• Further	data	analysis
• Discussions	with	curriculum	
committees	and	faculty	
councils
• Continuation	of	t...
Contact	
Hannah	Peters
hannaholiviapeters21@gmail.com
Samantha	Pattridge
Associate	Professor
Samantha.Pattridge@ufv.ca
References
• Babcock,	P.	S.,	Marks,	M.	(2010).	Leisure	College	USA:	the	decline	in	
student	study	time.	Washington,	DC:	Am...
• Kember,	D.	(2004).	Interpreting	student	workload	and	the	factors	
which	shape	students’	perceptions	of	their	workload.	S...
• Myers,	S.	A.,	&	Thorn,	K.	(2013).	The	relationship	between	students’	
motives	to	communicate	with	their	instructors,	cou...
• Silva,	E.,	White,	T.,	Toch,	T.,	&	Carnegie	Foundation	for	the	
Advancement	of	Teaching.	(2015).	The	Carnegie	Unit:	A	cen...
Analysis of UFV Student Learning Patterns: Ratio of Instructor-Directed (In-Class) to Independent (Out-of-Class) Time Spen...
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Analysis of UFV Student Learning Patterns: Ratio of Instructor-Directed (In-Class) to Independent (Out-of-Class) Time Spent on Learning Activities

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Presentation by Samantha Pattridge and Hannah Peters (UFV)

Symposium 2017: Scholarly Teaching & Learning in Post-Secondary Education

The Symposium is an annual one-day event presented by the BCTLC and BCcampus that combines presentations, discussions, and networking with colleagues who share an interest in scholarly teaching and learning in post-secondary education.

When: Nov. 6, 2017
Where: Simon Fraser University – Harbour Centre, Vancouver, B.C., Canada

Published in: Education
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Analysis of UFV Student Learning Patterns: Ratio of Instructor-Directed (In-Class) to Independent (Out-of-Class) Time Spent on Learning Activities

  1. 1. Samantha Pattridge Hannah Peters Analysis of UFV Student Learning Patterns: Ratio of Instructor-Directed (In-Class) to Independent (Out-of-Class) Time Spent on Learning Activities
  2. 2. • Introductions • Project details • Findings • Implications and discussion
  3. 3. Discipline-specific (e.g. Bonesronning & Opstad, 2012; Bower, 2012; Scully & Kerr, 2014; Ruiz-Gallardo, Castano, Gomez-Alday & Valdes, 2011) Student perceptions of workload (e.g. Kyndt et al 2014; Myers & Thorn 2013; Mottet, Parker-Raley, Beebe & Cunningham, 2007; Kember & Leung, 1996, 2006) General time use (e.g. Welker & Wadzuk, 2012; Kingsland, 1996 US Bureau of Labor Statistics: 1.53 hours/day Maclean’s: 10.39 to 19.96 hours/week
  4. 4. Survey Details • Ethics approval • Structure: • Pilot followed by full study • Two surveys per term • Faculty survey • Classes surveyed n=44
  5. 5. Overall Findings • Survey 1 mean: 4.63 hours/week • Survey 2 mean: 5.16 hours/week 14 79 122 102 92 75 49 18 27 9 21 40 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 More Number of respondents Number of Hours Total Reported Hours per Week across All Courses Surveyed: Survey 1 6 32 72 91 68 56 38 20 24 16 25 49 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 More Number of Respondents Number of Hours Total Reported Hours across All Courses Surveyed: Survey 2
  6. 6. Findings by Faculty 5.47 6.11 4.77 6.30 6.13 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Health Humanities Professional Studies Science Social Science Average Hours per Week Reported
  7. 7. Findings by Delivery Format • Poor response rate from online and hybrid (n=32) • 7 of 19 sections represented • Mean of average hours per week: 7.3 hours
  8. 8. Findings by Student Year 5.38 4.52 4.50 5.41 6.22 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 0 to 30 30 to 60 60 to 90 90 to 120 120+ Average Number of Hours Reported Number of Credits: Student Year of Study Hours per week
  9. 9. Faculty Expectations vs. Student Reports 0 2 8 7 5 1 1 7 0 2 0 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 More Number of Faculty Respondents Hours Expected Faculty Expectations of Time Spent Outside Class
  10. 10. Faculty Expectations vs. Student Reports 6 32 72 91 68 56 38 20 24 16 25 49 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 More Number of Respondents Number of Hours Total Reported Hours across All Courses Surveyed: Survey 2
  11. 11. 1. Did any results in this study surprise you? Why? 2. Considering the amount of time students report spending on course work outside class each week, how do you think you might adjust your syllabus, expectations, or instructions? Small Group Discussion 3. What are the institutional policy and practice implications of the findings?
  12. 12. Moving Forward • Further data analysis • Discussions with curriculum committees and faculty councils • Continuation of the study • ???
  13. 13. Contact Hannah Peters hannaholiviapeters21@gmail.com Samantha Pattridge Associate Professor Samantha.Pattridge@ufv.ca
  14. 14. References • Babcock, P. S., Marks, M. (2010). Leisure College USA: the decline in student study time. Washington, DC: American Enterprise Institute. • Bonesronning, H., Opstad, L. (2012). How much is students’ college performance affected by quantity of study? International Review of Economics Education, 11(2), 46-63. • Bower, K. (2012). A model of student workload. Journal of Higher Education Policy and Management, 34(3), 239-258, DOI: 10.1080/1360080X.2012.678729 • Burke, L., Amselem, M.C., & Hall, J. (2016). Big debt, little study: What taxpayers should know about college students’ time use. Report on Education. The Heritage Foundation. Retrieved from http://www.heritage.org/education/report/big-debt-little-study-what- taxpayers-should-know-about-college-students-time-use
  15. 15. • Kember, D. (2004). Interpreting student workload and the factors which shape students’ perceptions of their workload. Studies in Higher Education, 29(2), 165-184, DOI: 10.1080/0307507042000190778 • Kember, D., Ng, S., Tse, H., Wong, E. T. T., & Pomfret, M. (1996) An examination of the interrelationships between workload, study time, learning approaches and academic outcomes. Studies in Higher Education, 21(3), 347-358, DOI: 10.1080/03075079612331381261 • Kyndt, E., Berghmans, I., Dochy, F. & Bulckens, D. (2014). Time is not enough. Workload in higher education: A student perspective. Higher Education Research & Development, 33(4), 684-698, DOI: 10.1080/07294360.2013.863839 • McCormick, A. (2011). It’s about time: What to make of reported declined in how much college students study. Liberal Education, 97(1), 30-39. • Mottet, T. P., Parker-Raley, J., Beebe, S. A., & Cunningham, C. (2007). Instructors who resist "college lite": The neutralizing effect of instructor immediacy on students' course-workload violations and perceptions of instructor credibility and affective learning. Communication Education, 56(2), 145-167. DOI: 10.1080/03634520601164259
  16. 16. • Myers, S. A., & Thorn, K. (2013). The relationship between students’ motives to communicate with their instructors, course effort, and course workload. College Student Journal, 47(3), 485-488. • Ruiz-Gallardo, J. R., Castaño, S., Gómez-Alday, J. J., & Valdés, A. (2011). Assessing student workload in Problem Based Learning: Relationships among teaching method, student workload and achievement. A case study in Natural Sciences. Teaching and Teacher Education, 27(11), 619- 627, DOI: 10.1016/j.tate.2010.11.001 • Schwartz, J. (2016). Where students study the most 2016. Macleans. Retrieved from http://www.macleans.ca/education/where-students- study-the-most-full-results/. • Scully, G., & Kerr, R. (2014). Student workload and assessment: Strategies to manage expectations and inform curriculum development. Accounting Education, 23(5), 443-466. doi:10.1080/09639284.2014.947094
  17. 17. • Silva, E., White, T., Toch, T., & Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. (2015). The Carnegie Unit: A century- old standard in a changing education landscape. Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching • Wellman, J., & Ehrlich, T. (2003). The credit hour: The tie that binds. New Directions for Higher Education, (122), 119-122. • Welker, A. L., & Wadzuk, B. (2012). How students spend their time. Journal of Professional Issues in Engineering Education & Practice, 138(3), 198-206. doi:10.1061/(ASCE)EI.1943- 5541.0000105

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