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Academic Librarians and OER: Access, Advocacy, and Activism

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Academic Librarians and OER: Access, Advocacy, and Activism

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Presentation by Dr. Rajiv Jhangiani, Kwantlen Polytechic University; Caroline Daniels, Librarian, Kwantlen Polytechnic University; and Brenda Smith, Librarian, Thompson Rivers University at the BC Library Association Conference, May 2015 in Richmond BC

Presentation by Dr. Rajiv Jhangiani, Kwantlen Polytechic University; Caroline Daniels, Librarian, Kwantlen Polytechnic University; and Brenda Smith, Librarian, Thompson Rivers University at the BC Library Association Conference, May 2015 in Richmond BC

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Academic Librarians and OER: Access, Advocacy, and Activism

  1. 1. Academic Librarians and OER: Access, Advocacy, and Activism Brenda Smith, Thompson Rivers University Dr. Rajiv Jhangiani, Kwantlen Polytechnic University Caroline Daniels, Kwantlen Polytechnic University
  2. 2. Today’s Plan • Background on OERs • Creative Commons Licensing & Attributions • OER in BC: Some Highlights • Making the case for faculty, students & institutions • Librarians: Small and Easy! Make it happen • BCOER Librarians
  3. 3. “Teaching, learning, and research resources that reside in the public domain or have been released under an intellectual property license that permits their free use and re-purposing by others.” Source: William and Flora Hewlett Foundation (http://www.hewlett.org/programs/education/open-educational-resources)
  4. 4. Types of OERs • textbooks • readings • multimedia files (e.g., videos) • software • assessment tools (e.g., quizzes, tests) • lessons/lesson plans • modules • entire courses
  5. 5. The 5 R’s of Openness • RETAIN the right to make, own, and control copies of the content • REUSE the right to use the content in a wide range of ways (e.g., in a class, in a study group, on a website, in a video) • REVISE the right to adapt, adjust, modify, or alter the content itself (e.g., translate the content into another language) • REMIX the right to combine the original or revised content with other open content to create something new (e.g., incorporate the content into a mashup) • REDISTRIBUTE the right to share copies of the original content, your revisions, or your remixes with others (e.g., give a copy of the content to a friend) Source: David Wiley, CC, March 2014, http://opencontent.org/blog/archives/3221
  6. 6. Open Content Licencing Middle range of licences between public domain and copyright – “some rights reserved”
  7. 7. http://creativecommons.org/
  8. 8. Creative Commons Licenses • Available free of charge to the public. • Allow creators to communicate which rights they reserve, and which rights they waive for the benefit of recipients or other creators. • Using a CC license on OERs is a mainstay within the sector.
  9. 9. Only for items you want to copy (linking and embedding are OK)
  10. 10. Creative Commons Licence Features
  11. 11. 6 Creative Commons Licences
  12. 12. 6 Creative Commons Licences Least Open Most Open
  13. 13. Public Domain Tools CCO Use if you want to waive all copyright and related rights for work that YOU have created. Public Domain Mark Use if you have identified a work that is free of known copyright restrictions.
  14. 14. How do I properly mark CC stuff that I use?
  15. 15. Attribution TASL T – Title A – Artist S – Source (usually link) L – CC Licence If you modify, note what you change.
  16. 16. "Clownfish and Sea Anemone 2" by Samuel Chow is licensed under CC BY 4.0
  17. 17. This is a modified image based on the image Clownfish and Sea Anemone 2" by Samuel Chow is licensed under CC BY 4.0. Text and arrows were added.
  18. 18. Adapting CC Material
  19. 19. This is a modified image based on the image Clownfish and Sea Anemone 2" by Samuel Chow is licensed under CC BY 4.0. Text and arrows were added. Amphiprioninae text from Wikipedia used under a CC-BY-SA licence.
  20. 20. Remixing CC Material Source 1 ↓ Source 2 https://wiki.creativecommons.org/Frequently_Asked_Questions/
  21. 21. This is a modified image based on the image Clownfish and Sea Anemone 2" by Samuel Chow is licensed under CC BY 4.0. Text and arrows were added. Amphiprioninae text from Wikipedia used under a CC-BY-SA licence. This image is released under a CC-BY-SA licence.
  22. 22. Attribution Builders • Open Attribution Builder: http://www.openwa.org/open-attrib-builder/ • Open Attribute (plugin): • http://openattribute.com/
  23. 23. Building a CC Licence http://creativecommons.org/choose/
  24. 24. OERs in BC
  25. 25. OERu http://oeru.org/
  26. 26. Open Textbook Project ● Phase 1: 2012 - highest enrolled academic subject areas ● Phase 2: 2014 - trades & skills training http://bccampus.ca/open-textbook-project/
  27. 27. Open Textbook Project: Adaptations & Creations in Top 40 Subject Areas
  28. 28. http://open.bccampus.ca/find-open-textbooks/?uuid=6c4a9484-8d43-4a44-a565- 09cc773aa53f&contributor=&keyword=&subject=History
  29. 29. SOL*R http://solr.bccampus.ca/
  30. 30. Professional Development • Educational Technology Users Group (ETUG): http://etug.ca/ • SCoPE: http://scope.bccampus.ca/ • Open Textbook Summit: http://otsummit.bccampus.ca/ • OpenEd Conference: http://openedconference.org/2015/
  31. 31. Why Are OERs Important?
  32. 32. • Half of Bachelor’s degree graduates rely on student loans • In Sept. 2010 Federal student loan debt surpassed $15 billion • Average BC student debt in 2011 was $29,497 • 3 years after graduating, only 34% are debt free • BC students now work 180% more hours than they did in 1975 to pay for PSE • When debt reaches $10,000, program completion rates drop from 59% to 8% • The cost of textbooks has increased by 812% over 30 years
  33. 33. • Half of Bachelor’s degree graduates rely on student loans • In Sept. 2010 Federal student loan debt surpassed $15 billion • Average BC student debt in 2011 was $29,497 • 3 years after graduating, only 34% are debt free • BC students now work 180% more hours than they did in 1975 to pay for PSE • When debt reaches $10,000, program completion rates drop from 59% to 8% • The cost of textbooks has increased by 812% over 30 years
  34. 34. • Half of Bachelor’s degree graduates rely on student loans • In Sept. 2010 Federal student loan debt surpassed $15 billion • Average BC student debt in 2011 was $29,497 • 3 years after graduating, only 34% are debt free • BC students now work 180% more hours than they did in 1975 to pay for PSE • When debt reaches $10,000, program completion rates drop from 59% to 8% • The cost of textbooks has increased by 812% over 30 years
  35. 35. • Half of Bachelor’s degree graduates rely on student loans • In Sept. 2010 Federal student loan debt surpassed $15 billion • Average BC student debt in 2011 was $29,497 • 3 years after graduating, only 34% are debt free • BC students now work 180% more hours than they did in 1975 to pay for PSE • When debt reaches $10,000, program completion rates drop from 59% to 8% • The cost of textbooks has increased by 812% over 30 years
  36. 36. But what about e-textbooks?
  37. 37. 60%+ do not purchase textbooks at some point due to cost 35% take fewer courses due to textbook cost 31% choose not to register for a course due to textbook cost 23% regularly go without textbooks due to cost 14% have dropped a course due to textbook cost 10% have withdrawn from a course due to textbook cost Source: 2012 student survey by Florida Virtual Campus There is a direct relationship between textbook costs and student success
  38. 38. Why Open Textbooks? Access Cost savings Portability Course performance Adapt, update, & remix Student retention Program completion
  39. 39. Hilton & Laman (2012) • 7 psychology faculty • Houston Community College • 23 sections (690 students) Traditional textbook (Spring 2011) Open textbook (Fall 2012) GPA 1.6 2.0 Withdrawal rate (%) 14 7.1 Final examination (%) 67.6 71.1 Hilton, J., & Laman, C. (2012). One college’s use of an open psychology textbook. Open Learning, 27(3), 265-272. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02680513.2012.716657
  40. 40. Robinson et al. (2014) • Quasi-experimental design • Propensity-score matched groups • OT students scored slightly higher on end-of- year standardized science tests • Significant gains in chemistry • No differences in physics or earth systems Robinson T. J., Fischer, L., Wiley, D. A., & Hilton, J. (2014). The impact of open textbooks on secondary science learning outcomes. Educational Researcher, 43(7), 341-351. doi: 10.3102/0013189X14550275
  41. 41. 2014 Babson Survey Those who have adopted OER rate the quality of OER as significantly higher: F(1, 35) = 7.88, p = .008, = 0.18 (Jhangiani et al., 2015)
  42. 42. Overall, I am satisfied with the quality of the modules/chapters in the open textbook
  43. 43. What is the average cost of the textbooks that you purchase for your other courses?
  44. 44. Overall, I am satisfied with the convenience, access, & portability of the open textbook %
  45. 45. I would have preferred to pay for a traditional textbook for this course
  46. 46. I like how the theories are explained in more understandable ways compared to other textbooks where the author tends to talk in circles before explaining what is being talked about I would not have bought the text book for this course because it's an elective. I would have possibly walked away with a C, now I might actually get an A- It is easily accessible and convenient. Material is easy to understand and follow I personally really like the convenience of having the complete set of chapters on my computer and even accessible from my phone if I need it. I like that I don't have to lug around another text book It's free and it's a great money saver
  47. 47. Jhangiani et al. (2015) • 78 participants representing 17 institutions • 72% have taught for >10 years
  48. 48. Use of OER
  49. 49. Challenges Faced
  50. 50. Enabling Factors
  51. 51. Open Education Practices Open Textbooks & Other OER Open Access Publishing Open Research Practices Open Pedagogy
  52. 52. OER - Think Locally …. Caroline Daniels Systems, Web and Interlibrary Loan Librarian Kwantlen Polytechnic University
  53. 53. BC Open Textbook Summit 2014
  54. 54. Off the side of my desk?
  55. 55. Opportunities vs. obstacle
  56. 56. Initial reaction
  57. 57. Gentle Liaison
  58. 58. The Easy factor Do anything to make it easier for faculty to use OER
  59. 59. Web Page - Keep it Simple!
  60. 60. Integration ideas: #1 Catalogue OER Collections
  61. 61. Integration#2 Integrate open resources into discovery layer
  62. 62. Integration #3 Gather OER resources in your ERM
  63. 63. Leverage traditional services for non traditional purposes
  64. 64. Ask for Help: BCcampus
  65. 65. Ebooks vs. Open Textbooks
  66. 66. Start a Small Team
  67. 67. Join a Big Team!
  68. 68. Stop Duplicating Work! BCcampus Media Wiki
  69. 69. KPU Libguides
  70. 70. Learn from Success Digital Course Pack from University of Minnesota • University of Minnesota Digital Course Pack
  71. 71. Tidewater College ‘Z’ Degree using only Open Content
  72. 72. Cal Poly Open Textbook Library
  73. 73. What’s Happening at KPU
  74. 74. “It’s just change”

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