Flat Stanley in Stockholm Sweden

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Flat Stanley project for Matty.

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Flat Stanley in Stockholm Sweden

  1. 1. FLAT STANLEY SWEDEN FEB – MAR 2011       Flat  Stanley’s   adventure  in   Stockholm,  Sweden       Dear Matty, I  had  a  wonderful  time  visiting  Uncle  John  and  Auntie  Becky   in  Stockholm,  Sweden.    There  were  lots  of  fun  things  to  see   and  do,  and  I  learned  a  lot  about  Swedish  culture  and  about   the  people  who  live  there,  too.     I  arrived  in  the  middle  of  February,  where  it  was  still  snowy   and  dark.    At  this  time  of  the  year,  there  is  only  8  hours  of   sunlight  on  a  sunny  day,  and  while  I  was  here,  it  was  always   below  freezing  outdoors.       Nonetheless,  I  learned  that  the  Swedish  people  (Swedes)   are  not  held  back  by  the  darkness  and  cold  and  will  still  go   out  and  do  fun  things,  anyway!    The  Swedes  are  known  for   loving  nature  and  being  outdoors.    Even  in  a  big  city  like   Stockholm,  there  are  lots  of  green-­‐spaces,  like  parks,   planned  into  the  city.    This  allows  school  kids,  like  you  and  I   to  be  able  to  play  outdoors  all  year  round!            
  2. 2. FEB – MAR 2011 The Swedes love outdoor life! VASAPARKEN   This  is  a  picture  of  Vasaparken,  a  big  park  near  Auntie  Becky  and  Uncle   John’s  home.    The  soccer  field  at  this  park  is  flooded  during  the  winter   and  turned  into  an  ice-­‐skating  and  hockey  rink.      Here’s  a  picture  of   school  kids  during  their  P.E.  class  practicing  skating  techniques  and   .Etiam getting  some  fun  exercise.    I  was  kind  of  cold,  so  I  stayed  in  my   protective  plastic  “bubble”.      Auntie  Becky’s  dogs  were  having  a  lot  of   fun  in  the  snow,  too!   Etiam  et  urna     Auntie  Becky,  like  the  Swedes,  enjoys  being  outdoors.    She  took  me   running  with  her  one  day  and  here  I  am  in  my  plastic  “bubble”.    I’m   overlooking  Lake  Mälaren.    This  is  the  body  of  water  that  is  under  the   snow  in  this  picture.    If  you  look  really  carefully,  you  can  see  footprints   on  the  snow!    People  have  been  walking  on  top  of  the  frozen  lake!       Actually,  in  some  areas,  the  water  is  frozen  solid  so  that  a   path  can  be  made  for  people  to  walk,  cross-­‐country  ski  and   long-­‐skate  on  top  of  the  water!    Auntie  Becky  went  cross-­‐ country  skiing  on  top  of  a  different  frozen  lake  with  some   friends.    Here  I  am  hanging  out  with  some  skiers  and  here   are  some  people  getting  ready  to  go  long-­‐skating.       Long-­‐skating  is  not  popular  in  the  United  States.    The  skates   look  like  regular  ice-­‐skates,  except  the  blade  is  longer.    This  is   so  skaters  can  skate  long-­‐distance.    These  people  are  ready   to  take  a  skating  tour  around  the  lake.    How  fun!       2  
  3. 3. FEB – MAR 2011   Swedish Culture   In  addition  to  outdoor  activities,  Swedes  like     going  to  museums,  too.    There  are  lots  of   THE  MODERN  MUSEUM   museums  to  see  in  Stockholm.         One  night,  Auntie  Becky  took  me  to  the  Modern   THE  VASA  MUSEUM   Museum.    It  is  a  museum  that  has  lots  of  unique     modern  artwork  from  Swedish  artists  as  well  as   Uncle  John  took  me  to  the  Vasa  Museum  (Vasa   famous  artists  around  the  world.      We  saw  an  art   means  “Ship”)  one  evening.    This  is  a  historical   exhibition  of  a  French  photographer  (Jeanloup   museum  about  a  big  wooden  boat  that  was  built   Sieff)  who  has  taken  pictures  for  many  magazines.     by  King  Gustav  II  Adolf  in  the  early  1600’s.    It’s  sad   He  specializes  in  black  and  white  pictures.    We   to  hear,  but  I  learned  that  it  took  over  two  years   also  saw  an  exhibit  by  Eva  Löfdahl.    She  is  a   to  build  the  Vasa  and  on  it’s  maiden  voyage  (the   Swedish  modern  artist  and  has  lots  of  very   very  first  voyage),  it  sank!    It  wasn’t  until  the   interesting  paintings  and  sculptures.       1960’s  that  Sweden  was  able  to  pull  the  ship  up   Hey!    This  looks  familiar!    I  think  I’ve  studies  this   from  under  water  and  restore  it.    I  got  to  see  the   artist  before….it’s  Henri  Matisse!    And  look!    It’s   Vasa  at  this  museum!    If  you  have  time,  you  can   my  favorite  condiment….ketchup.    But  what  is  it   watch  the  video  about  the  historic  ship!   doing  spilled  over  a  block  and  on  the  floor?    Huh?       I  don’t  know.    What  do  you  think?           3  
  4. 4. FEB – MAR 2011 THE  CULTURE  HOUSE  (KULTUR  HUSET)     One  of  my  favorite  places  that  I  visited  was  the  Culture  House   (Kultur  Huset)  of  Stockholm.  The  Culture  House  is  a  very  big   building  with  many  floors.  Wait,  there’s  a  lady  hanging  from  the   building…oh,  she’s  not  real.    How  funny!     Ut  Sed  Est   I  got  to  ride  on  the  subway,   called  the  Tunnelbana   (pronounced:    “Toonel  bana”  )   to  T-­‐Centralen  (the  Central   Located  on  the  bottom  floor  of  the  Culture  House  is  a  brand  new   Station).    The  T-­‐bana  looks  a  lot   library!    I  can  read  some  English  books  there  as  well  as  Swedish  books.     like  BART.    The  closest  station  to   They  also  have  newspapers  of  all  different  languages,  from  lots  of   Uncle  John  and  Auntie  Becky’s   different  countries.    My  favorite  floor,  however,  is  the  4th  floor.    This   house  is  S:t  Eriksplan  (Sankt   floor  houses  the  music  and  film  library.  Look!  I  can  practice  playing  my   Eriksplan).    It  is  about  5  stops   favorite  pieces  on  the  piano  here  and  listen  to  myself  play  with   earphones  on.    I  can  also  sit  and  listen  to  some  of  my  favorite   music  that  I  don’t  have  at  home.         The  4th  floor  also  features  the  brand  new  Tiotreton  (pronounced:     “Teeyew-­‐treatton”)  library.    This  library  is  a  one  that’s  specifically   designed  for  kids  aged  10  (tio)  through  13  (treton).    It’s  really  cool.     I  can  learn  to  cook—there’s  a  full  kitchen  there,  I  can  learn  to   make  music  or  a  movie  on  a  computer,  I  can  make  crafts,  learn  to   sew  or  I  can  just  relax  in  the  cool  bunk-­‐style  chairs!    I  can   also  read  my  favorite  books,  too.…only,  I  have  to   learn  Swedish,  first.         By  the  way,  do  you  know  who  Pipi  Longstocking  is?     She  is  a  character  from  a  book  written  by  a  Swedish   author,  Astrid  Lindegren.    In  Swedish,  her  name  is  Pipi   Longstrump!    Auntie  Becky  included  an  English   translation  of  this  book  to  introduce  her  to  you!         4  
  5. 5. FEB – MAR 2011 LEARNING  THE  SWEDISH  LANGUAGE        I  think  being  able  to  talk  to  Swedish  kids  in  their     native  language  and  read  interesting  Swedish     books  is  a  good  reason  to  learn  the  language!    So,     Auntie  Becky  took  me  to  one  of  her  daily  Swedish     language  classes.    I  got  to  meet  her  teacher,  Gull-­‐ Besides   Britt  Andersson,  and  some  of  her  classmates  who   the  cinnamon  rolls,  traditional   are  from  around  the  world.    Here’s  me  with  Anna   Swedish  food  is  also  different  from  American   from  Poland,  Kristan  from  Germany,  and  Manisha   food.     from  India!      We’re  learning  Swedish  so  we  can  all     speak  the  same  language  together!   The  southern  tip  Sweden  is  surrounded  by  water,     therefore,  Swedes  enjoy  eating  lots  of  fish  like   salmon  and  herring,  and  seafood  like  shrimp  and   crayfish.     Swedes  from  the  northern  part  of  the  country  eat   more  meat  such  as  beef,  reindeer  and  elk   because  there  are  more  pastures  and  forests.     Since  there  are  lots  of  cows  in  northern  Sweden,   milk  and  dairy  products  like  butter,  yogurt  and  ice   cream  are  also  popular  and  very  tasty  here.   Sweden  only  gets  a  few  hours  of  sunlight  during   some  parts  of  the  year,  therefore  the  growing   season  for  vegetables  is  very  short.      As  a  result,   popular  Swedish  vegetables  actually  grow   SWEDISH  CUISINE  &  TRADITIONS     underground,  like  carrots,  potatoes,  beets  and   Sometimes  after  class,  Auntie  Becky  “fikar”   parsnips!    They  have  to  import  lots  of  other   (fee-­‐kar)  with  her  new  friends.    Fika  is  a  Swedish   vegetables  from  warmer  countries.    Berries  are  a   tradition  meaning,  “to  go  for  a  coffee  break”.     popular  fruit  in  Sweden,  especially  in  the  summer.     Swedes  typically  fika  everyday  drinking  very   They  like  to  eat  lingonberries  and  cloudberries.     strong  coffee  and  have  something  sweet,  like  a   These  are  kind  of  sour  and  taste  much  like   kanelbulle  (“kaneel-­‐booly”),  or  a  cinnamon  roll.     cranberries!       These  cinnamon  rolls  don’t  quite  taste  like  the   Uncle  John  and  Auntie  Becky  took  me  to  a   ones  you  and  I  eat  in  the  United  States,  but  they   traditional  Swedish  restaurant  called  Fem  Små   are  still  yummy.     Hus  (Five  Small  Houses)  to  try  Swedish  cuisine.       5  

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