Social Shaping of  Malaysian National Biomass Agenda:   Building the Value Added Productsfrom an Abundance of Oil Palm Bio...
IntroductionThe NBS (2011) is to determine how Malaysia candevelop new biomass sectors with the aim ofgaining more revenue...
Our National Comparative Advantage1. Malaysia’s oil palm plantations with the totalacreage has grown to 4.85 million hecta...
Our National Comparative Advantage3. Malaysia’s oil palm industry is the 4th largestcontributor to the nation’s, RM50billi...
Figure 1: Upstream and downstream of oil palm industry
Upstream-The upstream activities have become hierarchicallysegmented.-Mainly producing palm oil for food, medicine and con...
Downstream:-currently attracting research.-new technologies are under research because they areperceived importance for ou...
Abundance of Oil Palm Biomass-An increase in planted area for oil palm was themain driver of biomass volume growth.-The fo...
Five Types of Oil Palm Biomass(a) oil palm fronds-Available throughout the year in the plantations as they are regularlycu...
The Quantity of BiomassHence, most of the solid biomass is found in theplantations (as fronds and trunks) account for75% o...
The Reality Checking-The pace of innovation in oil palm downstreamactivities is coupled with the need to maintain inter-op...
The Reality Checking…-The downstream opportunities has to beefficiency managed to ensure sustainabilitygrowth in this sect...
Our Technologies at Downstream-The most up-to-date engineering research on value-added biomass products, where some of the...
Our Technology at Downstream…-We understand that, different biomass products havedifferent risk-return profiles which are ...
Conclusion-Research into the implementation of value added on palmoil downstream biomass has uncovered a wide range ofsoci...
Recommendation•Historically, the technological change in the industryinvolves a typically painful learning process that ha...
Recommendation•Hence, to achieve full potential of oil palm biomass will requiresignificant coordination and cooperation a...
Recommendation•Consequently, the institution created along the value chainwill playing their respective functions in trans...
Source• Please acknowledge the authors:Chew, B.C. and Hamid, S.R. 2012. SocialShaping of Malaysian National Biomass Agenda...
Contact1. Boon Cheong ChewGoogle BCChew for LinkedIn and some of his workemail: bcchew@email.comMy primary research intere...
Social Shaping of Malaysian Biomass Strategy 2020
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Social Shaping of Malaysian Biomass Strategy 2020

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Chew, B.C. and Hamid, S.R. 2012. Social Shaping of Malaysian National Biomass Agenda: Building the Value Added Products from an Abundance of Oil Palm Biomass. In International Conference on Biomass for Biofuels and Value-Added Products (ICBBVAP) 2012. Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia 23-24 October 2012.
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http://www.academia.edu/2028507/Social_Shaping_of_Malaysian_National_Biomass_Agenda_Building_the_Value_Added_Products_from_an_Abundance_of_Oil_Palm_Biomass

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Social Shaping of Malaysian Biomass Strategy 2020

  1. 1. Social Shaping of Malaysian National Biomass Agenda: Building the Value Added Productsfrom an Abundance of Oil Palm Biomass Boon Cheong Chew and Syaiful Rizal Hamid bcchew@utem.edu.my syaiful@utem.edu.myFaculty of Technology Management and Technopreneurship University of Technical Malaysia Melaka Hang Tuah Jaya 76100 Durain Tunggal Melaka
  2. 2. IntroductionThe NBS (2011) is to determine how Malaysia candevelop new biomass sectors with the aim ofgaining more revenue from oil palm industrythrough the utilisation of the associated biomass, inorder to create higher value-added economicactivities (downstream) that contribute towards:(a) Malaysia’s gross national income(b) High value jobs
  3. 3. Our National Comparative Advantage1. Malaysia’s oil palm plantations with the totalacreage has grown to 4.85 million hectares in2010 (NBS, 2011).2. Malaysia is the world’s second largest producerand the world’s largest exporter of crude palm oil(NBS, 2011).
  4. 4. Our National Comparative Advantage3. Malaysia’s oil palm industry is the 4th largestcontributor to the nation’s, RM50billion of GNI(MPOB, 2011).4. It is estimated that Malaysia could benefitfrom an additional RM30billion contribution tothe GNI by utilising the oil palm biomass, whichidentified as part of the National Key EconomicArea.
  5. 5. Figure 1: Upstream and downstream of oil palm industry
  6. 6. Upstream-The upstream activities have become hierarchicallysegmented.-Mainly producing palm oil for food, medicine and consumerproducts.-This marks out a degree of autonomy between thedevelopment of these different components of the oil palmproduction system at these upstream activities, wherebyinteraction between each set of components is encouragedand sustained until today.
  7. 7. Downstream:-currently attracting research.-new technologies are under research because they areperceived importance for our national strategies.-the importance of innofusion would focus upon a nexusbetween diverse players: not only those involved in oil palmsupply, but also various organisations (public sectors,research laboratories, IoHL, associated private sectors,potential users etc all are “sateliting” on the oil palmindustry downstream, to create value added products fromoil palm biomass.
  8. 8. Abundance of Oil Palm Biomass-An increase in planted area for oil palm was themain driver of biomass volume growth.-The forecasted growth will be influenced by acombination of plantation expansion and oil palmfresh fruit bunch yield improvement, resulted froman effective plantation management, cropmaterials’ scientific innovation and efficientreplanting of mature plantations.
  9. 9. Five Types of Oil Palm Biomass(a) oil palm fronds-Available throughout the year in the plantations as they are regularlycut during harvesting of fresh fruit bunches and pruning of the palmtrees.(b) trunks- Available in the plantations (at the end of plantation lifecycle)(c) empty fruit bunches-remain after the removal of the palm fruits from the fruit bunches.(d) palm kernel(e) shells and mesocarp fibre. The NBS (2011)*palm kernel, mesocarp fibre and shells are remained after theextraction of crude palm oil at mills.
  10. 10. The Quantity of BiomassHence, most of the solid biomass is found in theplantations (as fronds and trunks) account for75% of the biomass volume, while the remaining25% is generated in the mills during theextraction of palm oil. (NBS, 2011).
  11. 11. The Reality Checking-The pace of innovation in oil palm downstreamactivities is coupled with the need to maintain inter-operability between the offerings of differentplayers.-The huge R&D costs of new products are coupledwith massive potential economies of scale that oilpalm biomass will bring.
  12. 12. The Reality Checking…-The downstream opportunities has to beefficiency managed to ensure sustainabilitygrowth in this sector.-Pellet..can we put higher value on the biomass,besides Pellet?
  13. 13. Our Technologies at Downstream-The most up-to-date engineering research on value-added biomass products, where some of the workshave attended to flows of technological informationbetween technologists and industry players in theinnovation process, highlighting the importance ofcollaborative networks (joint/collaborative R&D).-The R&D is ongoing to search for technologicalefficiency driven techniques, in order to boost thequality of value-added biomass and to attain speed ofdelivery.
  14. 14. Our Technology at Downstream…-We understand that, different biomass products havedifferent risk-return profiles which are largely determined byour capacity of the production technologies and globaldemand.-Different conversion technologies need to be tested, thenpilot plants and leading up to commercial scale plantestablishment. This could be done through various channelstechnology transfer advocated by Khalil (2000)*International technology transfer, regional technology transfer, cross-industry/crosssector technology transfer, interfirm technology transfer, intrafirm technology transfer.
  15. 15. Conclusion-Research into the implementation of value added on palmoil downstream biomass has uncovered a wide range ofsocial factors shaping the design of these technologies.-These factors include the socioeconomic and politicalobjectives of the policy makers, industry players; as well asthe immediate features of the process, while in the broadercontext, including the industrial relations system andnational culture (vision and mission), global agenda (greenand sustainable) have all been shown to be significant.
  16. 16. Recommendation•Historically, the technological change in the industryinvolves a typically painful learning process that has, todate, been repeated for each new technical offering as itemerges (Senker 1987).•This is because policy makers, industry players and otherinstitutions have consistently underestimated thedifficulty of implementing these new technologies, andthe need to invest in developing these technologies withtraining required and subsequent supporting institutionsneeded.
  17. 17. Recommendation•Hence, to achieve full potential of oil palm biomass will requiresignificant coordination and cooperation among stakeholders. In orderto materialise this opportunity, the Malaysian Government must ensurethat the right regulatory framework and incentive package areinstituted. This will be achieved through:(a) supporting the formation of cooperatives among plantation ownersby adopting new policies which could reduce the risks of businesspartnering.(b) establish the new entry point projects and the expansion of thescope of a few existing projects under the palm oil NKEA.(c ) to fund the related R&D projects of biofuels and biobased chemicals.This could catalyse both the public and private sectors investments.
  18. 18. Recommendation•Consequently, the institution created along the value chainwill playing their respective functions in transforming thelandscape of the palm oil biomass industry, to simulateinnovative activities in economies on a national scale.•The linkages among all related institutions help intransmitting information flow and allocate both roles andresponsibilities that ought to be played.•The next stage is to determine the learning innovation and tothe extend which R&D and future production strategies couldbe integrated and materialised along the innofusion process.
  19. 19. Source• Please acknowledge the authors:Chew, B.C. and Hamid, S.R. 2012. SocialShaping of Malaysian National Biomass Agenda:Building the Value Added Products from anAbundance of Oil Palm Biomass. In InternationalConference on Biomass for Biofuels and Value-Added Products (ICBBVAP) 2012. Kuala Lumpur,Malaysia 23-24 October 2012.
  20. 20. Contact1. Boon Cheong ChewGoogle BCChew for LinkedIn and some of his workemail: bcchew@email.comMy primary research interest:(a) Renewable energy development and deployment.(b) Clean technologies innovation and implementation.2. Syaiful Rizal HamidSyaiful@utem.edu.mySyaiful’s primary research interest:(a) Quality Management and Technology Management(b) Design Manufacturing

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