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Radium Company of America - Sellersville, PA

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Century-long deception on the part of municipal, county, state, and federal agencies in Bucks County, Pennsylvania that continues despite dangers to the health and welfare of local residents.

Additional information: http://www.topix.com/forum/city/quakertown-pa/TPEQLOCLMKDU9C174

Published in: Environment
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Radium Company of America - Sellersville, PA

  1. 1. Sellersville's Radium Industry: THE TRUTH Trenton Evening Times - January 8, 1914: “It has thrown this little Bucks County town into such a glow of proud excitement as it has never known.” If Sellersville was so “proud,” then why was it kept out of their history books? “Dr. Siegfried Kohn, the company's Austrian chemist (and friend of Marie Curie), carried several milligrams of Sellersville- made radium about New York City and left it with the professor of physics at Columbia University...” The Sellersville facility, the largest such operation in the world, was also visited by scientists from all over the globe. Kind of a big deal. So, again, why was this kept out of Sellersville's history books? And Bucks County's history books? And Pennsylvania's history books? And when area waterways were glowing orange from radiation in the 1990s, why did the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection have to publish articles in local newspapers asking if anyone knew of what could be causing these radioactive “hot spots” in the Sellersville area? *(See below Morning Call article.) “The company's plant is a big affair. Among other things, on two long floors, it contains some 30 gigantic vats in which acids, elevated by compressed air, play upon the (uranium) ore, reducing it to various stages...The largest piece (of equipment) in existence, a gigantic (earthen) container, is about to be installed.” A gigantic container, eh? *Allentown Morning Call - December 26, 1996: Twelfth and Main, as it is physically situated today, was the location of a small textile facility owned by Armure Tapestry that was utilized (after it went into receivership) as a test facility for radium extraction and subsequent production of radium paint for U.S. Gauge years later. It was not the site of the uranium plant that milled the ore, which is the facility referenced in the article from 1914. That facility was located in the southern portion of Sellersville, where AMETEK's former “Plant #2” is located today--along with over 300 illegally-constructed homes. This is also the location where pitchblende (uranium) was geologically found in 1909. Furthermore, this is where the core of the original borough of Sellersville was situated before it was relocated northwest of this area to where it is physically situated today.
  2. 2. Environmental records for the state's cleanup at the old tapestry location (Twelfth and Main) note that the radium industry only operated in Sellersville until 1917. That is false. The plant expanded via the construction of an enlarged extraction facility adjacent to the uranium mill in the southeastern portion of the borough. Operations didn't cease in 1917; they resumed after the plant's expansion was complete...and they continued well into the 1920s. Bristol Daily Courier - November 3, 1916: Allentown Democrat - January 18, 1917: I challenge the local “historians” who continue to refuse to acknowledge any of this: Prove me wrong. Please. What has happened here is disgusting, and it's criminal. Screenshots of material (page 1) copyrighted in full or in part by the Allentown Morning Call, 1996; NewsBank and/or the American Antiquarian Society, 2004. Screenshots of material (page 2) obtained via Newspaperarchive.com and copyrighted in full or in part by the Bristol Daily Courier and Allentown Democrat. Publisher copyrights have expired for material printed prior to January 1, 1923. “Fair use” is supported by Section 107 of the Copyright Act of 1976.

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