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Role of CIOs in the
Era of Connection
Innovating America’s Future
The Role of CEOs in the Era of Connection: Innovating America’s Future 2
3	 Executive Summary
4	 Customer-centric innovati...
3
Executive Summary
Chief Information Officers (CIOs) will face dramatic changes
in the next five to seven years, as archi...
The Role of CEOs in the Era of Connection: Innovating America’s Future 4
Customer-centric innovation
The intersection of i...
The Role of CEOs in the Era of Connection: Innovating America’s Future 5
CIO: What is the
Chief Information Officer?
The r...
The Role of CEOs in the Era of Connection: Innovating America’s Future 6
then included customer satisfaction,
employee eng...
The Role of CEOs in the Era of Connection: Innovating America’s Future 7
AEC/O big data opportunities
As we know, the inte...
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discussed. One development company
did an analysi...
The Role of CEOs in the Era of Connection: Innovating America’s Future 9
In the Making the Grade Report, 45
AEC/O companie...
The Role of CEOs in the Era of Connection: Innovating America’s Future 10
giving technology and innovations (IP)
away so t...
The Role of CEOs in the Era of Connection: Innovating America’s Future 11
•	 Searching for patterns horizontally
across yo...
The Role of CEOs in the Era of Connection: Innovating America’s Future 12
from this discussion were security; internal
dat...
The Role of CEOs in the Era of Connection: Innovating America’s Future 13
the expanded role expected of CIOs. The
ability ...
The Role of CEOs in the Era of Connection: Innovating America’s Future 14
Appendix A – CIO Survey results
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Role of CIOs in the Era of Connection

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Chief Information Officers (CIOs) will face dramatic changes in the next five to seven years, as architecture, engineering, and construction and owner-operated (AEC/O) firms come to grip with the massive amounts of information being generated by all things digital. They will face new technology, redefined business processes, and shifting customer demands, both internally and externally. Leading this evolution will be critical, as CIOs are the key company decision makers and leaders within AEC/O firms, determining the success of a firm’s growth and business strategies by understanding the intersection of information and business value.

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Role of CIOs in the Era of Connection

  1. 1. Role of CIOs in the Era of Connection Innovating America’s Future
  2. 2. The Role of CEOs in the Era of Connection: Innovating America’s Future 2 3 Executive Summary 4 Customer-centric innovation 5 CIO: What is the Chief Information Officer? 7 AEC/O big data opportunities 8 Responding to the new AEC/O digital business landscape 10 Fighting tomorrow’s war with yesterday’s lessons and attitudes 12 CIOs in the era of connection—connecting big data to business strategy 12 Final summary and key takeaways 14 Appendix A – CIO Survey results Contents
  3. 3. 3 Executive Summary Chief Information Officers (CIOs) will face dramatic changes in the next five to seven years, as architecture, engineering, and construction and owner-operated (AEC/O) firms come to grip with the massive amounts of information being generated by all things digital. They will face new technology, redefined business processes, and shifting customer demands, both internally and externally. Leading this evolution will be critical, as CIOs are the key company decision makers and leaders within AEC/O firms, deter- mining the success of a firm’s growth and business strategies by understanding the intersection of information and business value. Role of CIOs in the Era of Connection Innovating America’s Future CIOs cannot ignore the major issues facing them in today’s business climate: customer-centric innovation; a new “era of connection”; big data; and fighting tomorrow’s business wars with today’s technologies. The next industrial revolu- tion will be a “connected era” where big data, created by connected devices, power decision-making, and above all - strategy. This generation, who are both users and customers, will share and use this information as normal currency and expect those who provide services to them to work in a similar manner. The era of connection will be vastly different from previous generations—when many AEC firms were educated and trained to provide services. Half of this new 86+ million generation doesn’t own a vehicle and over 60 percent are urbanites. Imagine the impact to the configuration of our cities. The results of our survey of CIOs of major AEC/O firms are telling, and the need for action is apparent: 62 percent of survey respondents stated the biggest challenge going forward is outdated tools and technology. But with 75 percent focusing budgets on busi- ness as usual, the case to make new, key technology investments for innova- tion and business differentiation must be made. How will CIOs not just cope with, but capitalize on, these changing times? To better understand this pending transition and companies’ areas of focus, we collected insight from AEC/O CIOs. The results of that survey are intended to identify what CIOs need to do business wide over the next several years, not just to stay relevant but to lead in this era of big data. Following are responses to the survey and outcomes of the CIO sympo- sium where these issues were discussed.
  4. 4. The Role of CEOs in the Era of Connection: Innovating America’s Future 4 Customer-centric innovation The intersection of information and business value is becoming a critical area for CIOs as the business world comes to grip with the massive amounts of in- formation being generated by all things digital. CIOs (both public and private) will be faced with profuse changes in technology and business processes in the next five to seven years: BIM and its future; 50–75 billion connected devices; the future of project management; shifting O&M data strategies; changes in how things are made; and the impact of cloud, mobile, social, and big data on firms’ future and current business strategies. Understanding how CIOs will address these issues is a critical step in all AEC/O firms’ business strategies, as the role of the CIO as a key company decision maker rises in importance and influence. As discussed in the book The Age Curve: How to Profit from the Coming Demographic Storm by Kenneth Gronbach, each product and service has a “best customer” that sustains a business. And the built environment industrial revolution will be a “connected era” where big data, created by con- nected devices, powers the Gen Y, who will share and use this information as normal currency and expect those who provide services to them to work in a similar manner. It will be vastly different than that of previous generations, when many providing firms were educated and trained to provide services. The new Gen Y professionals think differently— their opinions on social, economic, and environmental issues are different, and that will influence our future. With more of this generation living in urban centers (60–70 percent), their influence will shape the mobility requirements of those cities for coming decades. Our CIO survey aims to identify areas of focus and create near-term goals to help CIOs stay relevant in the industry (without being run over by big data). This report includes the responses to the sur- vey and the outcomes of the CIO survey symposium where these were discussed. serviced by AEC/O professionals is no dif- ferent. CIOs will be a key contributor to deciding what technology is needed to collect the information and knowledge to make this shift, while ensuring data security. CIO’s are standing on a gold mine, but are so distracted by security that it is incredibly difficult for them to grasp the opportunity, let alone grab the influence within their firms that they need to have. The upcoming Generation Y (echo-boomers) are the largest genera- tion in history—some 86+ million—thus dwarfing the last large generation, the baby boomers at 78 million. Today’s Gen X are only 69 million strong. With the much smaller Generation X (many of us) coming to our end of the buying cycle like the baby boomers before us, dramatic shifts are pending in our built environment and what is important, what it looks like, and what we prioritize. It will be Gen Y and their ideas that will shape our future, just as the baby boomers shaped it dur- ing our industrial revolution. This next “It will be Gen Y and their ideas that will shape our future, just as the baby boomers shaped it during our industrial revolution.”
  5. 5. The Role of CEOs in the Era of Connection: Innovating America’s Future 5 CIO: What is the Chief Information Officer? The responsibilities of the CIO are changing. According to the survey results and the discussion that followed during the symposium, a chasm exists between their traditional tech focus and the coming leadership role that will be required of them—one that goes beyond IT to business develop- ment and strategy. This leadership role, one that gathers, handles, distributes, interprets, and makes decisions about information, is going to be powerful in driving future strategy. As CIOs get more involved in strategy and business development, they must balance this new area of responsibility with that of the traditional IT execu- tive role, without stifling innovation. However, when “the lights go out” or data is breached, they still have to be on top of their historical IT func- tion. This leads to a broader ques- tion: In today’s data-centric era, do we need a new “C” title—a CSO, or Chief Security Officer? The discussion focused on the fact that the role of the CIO has changed fundamentally in this era where security is more than bits and bytes, it is both critical and truly something else—a pathway into a firm, or clients’ secrets that need to be 100 percent protected, day and night. Survey responses were noticeably light on the value of social media or SMAC in general (social media, mobili- zation, analytics, and cloud) in a CIO’s strategy. With 90 percent of project overruns coming from non-communi- cation of non-agreement (that is, failed discussions among stakeholders) this statistic resonated with attendees as an area that is low-hanging fruit for SMAC to address and improve. Building and implementing a social network success- fully requires buy-in, commitment, and participation of corporate leadership at its highest levels. But the effort of crowdsourcing information from across the company can increase harmonization of internal communication and help create a culture of sharing. In 1996, a federal law that made IT a priority in the federal government and mandated agencies to create the CIO position truly changed the game in raising the status of the CIO to a C-level executive. The corporate world took note and followed suit. Originally, the CIO was under the purview of the CFO, as the power of controlling the technol- ogy budget made the CIO defer major decisions until the CFO signed off. More recently, this has changed in many innovative firms as the role of informa- tion (versus just IT budget) is rising in importance in all strategic decisions and is now required for sound business strategy. This shift, however, requires that key priorities must be addressed to ensure the CIO as a visionary type of leader versus someone who runs the day-to-day. Respondents stated that it takes the complete support and buy-in of the CEO, who views information at all levels, to transform a company’s business model and the objective of the CIO. It is critical to know that the mission of the CIO is still grounded in its origins from 1996. What was important in the ‘90s is just as important today, but with more sophisticated tools. Priorities back “It is critical to know that the mission of the CIO is still grounded in its origins from 1996. What was important in the ‘90s is just as important today, but with more sophisticated tools.”
  6. 6. The Role of CEOs in the Era of Connection: Innovating America’s Future 6 then included customer satisfaction, employee engagement, and security of employees and of internal systems; those priorities have not changed. CIOs need to understand the needs of the company, and for that they need to know the needs of customers, both internal and external. What role does (or can) technology play in getting what the customers want? How to get that message back to the leaders of the company is crucial to understand as the pace of technology increases. The biorhythmic cycle of the informa- tion technology realm is often 10 times faster than in the AEC/O space, so keeping pace can be challenging. Attendee discussion at the symposium around employee engagement and its connection to customer satisfaction revealed one of the ways to keep pace: use internet protocol (IP) that exists within the company—not IP in the sense of technology, but IP in the sense of employees. While this strategy may be obvious to some firms, it is clear in the discussion of the CIO survey at the symposium that responses to the survey (Appendix, page 20/chart 1) were noticeably light on the value of social media or SMAC in general. CIOs stated the focus on another “I”—as in “Internal” relationships within companies—is certainly important and the platform for building those relation- ships needs to be broad enough to cap- ture the breadth of the human experi- ence in those relationships. However, if successfully done, that platform allows for not only better internal commu- nication through open sharing and a sense of community regardless of place or seniority in the organization, but a company that can better respond to the changing and challenging needs of their clients by utilizing all employees to tackle a client project and challenges, not just the select few project man- ager/client agents. This crowdsourced company approach enables information to be used to drive innovation both internally and externally, and the CIO is best executive positioned to make this happen. believe their top business priority in the next 18–24 months is strategy transformation to new business models. 2015 cio survey 44%
  7. 7. The Role of CEOs in the Era of Connection: Innovating America’s Future 7 AEC/O big data opportunities As we know, the intersection of informa- tion and business value is becoming a critical role for CIOs in the age of big data. But with this knowledge comes the question of what or where the opportunities are. In discussion with CIOs about the one recommendation they would pass along to peers in order to understand the opportunities to use big data to create value (e.g., innovate), the following suggestions were made: • Give a human face to big data Integrate people into big data plat- forms by including features that organi- cally generate engagement (which can be utilized for work benefits) rather than by promoting the platform directly as a purely professional tool. This reinforced the fact highlighted from the survey that building and implementing a social net- work successfully requires buy-in, com- mitment, and participation and putting a human face on big data helps to accom- plish this. And crowdsourcing information from across the company helps increase harmonization of internal communication and create a culture of sharing. • Create a case study A case study (or studies) with dem- onstration projects including industry- backed research could help motivate others. Building a team with appropri- ate risk tolerance to try an innovative approach—or mitigating the risk to individual enterprises by aggregating it at an industry level— means the team can undertake a project that explores a specific context and generates a concrete/tan- gible result that can be shared. For example, projects might look at sources of big data, how those sources of data can be used in innovative ways, and what unrelated/unanticipated insights emerge from the exercise. • Intersection of big data and the finan- cial bottom line Because CEOs and executives are often preoccupied with saving money or mak- ing new money based on advantages uncovered by analysis on profit, focus on identifying opportunities in big data with a financial bottom line perspective in mind. Identify lessons learned and best path forward and document these as supporting business case metrics to apply in a wider fashion across the company. • Appoint a “Chief Librarian” For AEC/O enterprises, especially large companies, someone needs to dig through and identify the range of data sources, organize the information, and develop approaches to curating it so useful insights can be extracted. It will be incredibly useful to have a dedicated “Chief Librarian” to lead the charge to uncover and knock off what is valuable to your industry. A case in point was “Building and implementing a social network successfully requires buy-in, commitment, and participation and putting a human face on big data helps to accomplish this.” “ Because CEOs and executives are often preoccupied with saving money or making new money based on advantages uncovered by analysis on profit, focus on identifying opportunities in big data with a financial bottom line perspective in mind.”
  8. 8. The Role of CEOs in the Era of Connection: Innovating America’s Future 8 discussed. One development company did an analysis of all their project design documents sitting on a server and dis- covered that they had used over 12,000 different types of walls over the past 10 years. This was driving up their costs, and steps could now be taken to reduce reinventing each project. This issue never would have come to light without looking at a large range of data sources. Responding to the new AEC/O digital business landscape The pressures to focus on the right way to increase our built environment—by taking into account new processes that use the power of the cloud both computationally and collaboratively—set the context for creating strategies to answer the big challenges demanded of our generation. Given today’s onslaught of information, CIOs need to know what kind of data to collect, how to package and share that data within a firm, and how to use this knowledge to influence the firm’s future strategy leads to understand where new business opportunities lie. It is clear that success varies by firm size and service industry, but it starts with the vision set out by the CEO using the business and data insight of the CIO. Big data is a phrase most commonly associated with the finance and retail sectors, but now for the first time in the history of AEC, we are starting to capture large amounts of highly trustworthy information using Building Information Modeling (BIM) technology and related systems. The question is, what might A/E/C/O organizations do with such capabilities? Today’s decisions can no longer be made in silos, with limited insight. The good news is that this explosion in digital content is proving to be a stimulant for innovation, to remove traditional barriers and shift to outcome-based approaches in order to deliver the highest lifecycle return versus lowest lifecycle cost of the built environment. And that’s poised to change the way we all think about, plan, design, build, finance, operate, and maintain our built environment. Using big data analytics to drive down the number of mistakes made in the real world, in everything from asset design to operations and maintenance, is key; it’s far cheaper to get it wrong virtu- ally than in reality. The phrase “if only” should disappear from the lexicon of project planning, design, and delivery— think of the boost this could deliver to your productivity. The not-so-obvious is what such an environment might do for responding to the boom-and-bust effect on the talent pool. How do you get people up-to-speed quickly? Might such environments provide an alternative way to accelerate new recruits through the process of acquiring knowledge and being industry-wise by ‘learning in the context of the real world’? “Big data is a phrase most commonly associated with the finance and retail sectors, but now for the first time in the history of AEC, we are starting to capture large amounts of highly trustworthy information using Building Information Modeling (BIM) technology and related systems.”
  9. 9. The Role of CEOs in the Era of Connection: Innovating America’s Future 9 In the Making the Grade Report, 45 AEC/O companies got together to talk about how, as a national imperative, we promote regaining America’s infrastruc- ture leadership through a renewed com- mitment to infrastructure development, both civil and social, for the long term. It is a high-level strategy, and a starting point to rekindle the foresight, initiative, investment, innovation, and hard labor that went into developing a national public infrastructure that has served as the foundation for economic expansion, prosperity, and opportunity for succes- sive generations of Americans. Part of accomplishing this goal is using informa- tion and knowledge to deliver on the promise of what big data could provide for that process. Now is the time for us to define what big data means, not to finance or IT, but to the A/E/C profession- als and firms who are the ones to deliver our future built environment. CIOs stated the data boom represents an opportunity to completely transform how firms design, construct, and operate buildings and infrastructure. While most agreed with this, the survey showed only 42 percent use big data always or even sometimes in planning of business and customer strategy. The remaining 58 percent use it seldom, if at all. In discussions, some of this lack of using big data comes from the fact that with anything new there are barriers that must be overcome. Issues like interoper- ability, reliability, and accuracy of the data, and—of course, of prime concern to a CIO—privacy and security. Beyond the internal view, the external view must be taken into account. Some CIOs noted that it’s a trust factor for the most part. Consultancies using data for customer strategies in particular, like data-driven planning, design, or operations, may require their client to open its data books or allow greater access to its employees or its customers for feedback. If this is a public client, the sensitivity can be tenfold. Even with this required change and concern around security, there was consensus with many on some aspects of what big data means to AEC/O organizations. It was agreed that big data is only useful when it can: • Be converted into knowledge • Combine analyses of different sources of big data, leading to better decisions • Produce actionable intelligence, mak- ing connections and patterns that you would not have otherwise have made • Lead to new business and client opportunities It is critically important for firms to have an overall strategy for big data—but how and what are the tough questions. The executive branches of many firms want to see technology as a commodity, but this is focused on the old way and will not drive the innovation op- portunities previously discussed. It has to be connected to new opportunities and/ or streams of revenue from outside or re- duction of costs and operating expenses inside. A case in point: imagine being able to sell information about everything from rivets to optimal structural construc- tion approaches based on size, risk, and cost from a thousand-odd projects to potential developers? As this new age of connection arrives, the distinction in products changes, and firms are now A National Six-Point Plan to Regain America’s Infrastructure Leadership ”Never doubt that a small group of committed people can change the world. It is the only thing that ever has.” —Margaret Mead, Anthropologist Making the Grade Report Out Making the Grade Report: A National Six-Point Plan to Regain America’s Infrastructure Leadership. Download whitepaper.
  10. 10. The Role of CEOs in the Era of Connection: Innovating America’s Future 10 giving technology and innovations (IP) away so that they become advertising and marketing, positioning these firms as thought leaders and innovators. Big data in decision making involves first securing a commitment within a company’s internal teams and then with external customers, partners, or organizations, then working as a holistic team, reinventing internal and external processes in order to organize behavior to this new approach. This skill set is not new to many CIOs, but few have exercised those muscles to such a wide potential audience. Fighting tomorrow’s war with yesterday’s lessons and attitudes How do we handle real-time analytics, social media analysis, growing volumes of video, and staggering volumes of big data assets? How is an explosion of digi- tal content driven by 50–75B connected devices changing everything we know about how everything is made? Under- standing these questions and ensuring current tools and technology can handle the answers will unlock the potential to drive future strategy and business model transformation. CIOs have always considered keeping the company—and, by extension, its data—safe as the top priority. A state- ment often quoted by CIOs is “You’ve either been hacked already, or you just don’t know it yet.” In today’s world this is an unfortunate but true statement, and with the upcoming deluge of con- nected devices by 2020 (the 50–75B), there will be many more potential points of entry (or sources of leaks) to be secured. With the main concern of security aside, 63 percent of the CIOs who responded to the survey indicated that they see modernization/innovation as their top priority, with cyber security coming in second at 13 percent. Clearly, this shows a forward direction; CIOs understand that securing their company and client data is paramount, and they have a good understanding of how to do that. The next step is to harness and use that information for business innovation and to modernize how they drive new business and business models. We are on the brink of the biggest change in civil and social infrastructure since the industrial revolution. Technology is rapidly changing how all AEC/O firms design and make things. Additionally, 56 percent of the surveyed CIOs noted capital- izing on internal data as the area in which they see the greatest potential for produc- tivity growth. Some of these opportunities that can innovate processes by capitalizing on internal data include: • Using cloud computing to access vast amounts of processing power on de- mand—the so-called “infinite comput- ing”—so that even the most complex analytical challenges will become routine, so that eventually a design or commercial change can be seen in near real time. • Using infinite computing to automati- cally explore the infinite range of design possibilities and land on the “best” solution—a process called “generative design”—enabling us to generate ideas from algorithms, and to analyze intercon- nected solution sets to improve building performance and infrastructure strategies to envision buildings and infrastructure that can better meet client and society’s needs and be constructed efficiently and effectively. “We are on the brink of the biggest change in civil and social infrastructure since the industrial revolution. Technology is rapidly changing how all AEC/O firms design and make things.” agree that modernization /innovation is the top priority. 2015 cio survey 63%
  11. 11. The Role of CEOs in the Era of Connection: Innovating America’s Future 11 • Searching for patterns horizontally across your portfolio of projects, or vertically through your historical proj- ects, together with other data sources in order to identify everything from early signs of stress in your supply chain, to better strategies for material hedging, to the best way to optimize cash flow, to the root cause for overes- timation in your bids. CIOs noted there is much that can be learned by using the vast amount of information contained in their project files (Appendix A, page 13/chart 2). They also agreed that new technologies and processes have evolved for the design, engineering, construction, operations, and maintenance of our built environ- ment that are superior to previous ways. These new technologies and processes help us approach the built environ- ment as integrated, networked “smart” systems rather than isolated building and engineering projects. With 62 percent of survey respondents stating the biggest challenge going for- ward is outdated tools and technology, it is clear that the methods, standards, and approaches that have served AEC/O firms well for many decades are now becoming outmoded and can actually stifle innovation in developing future buildings and infrastructure that can ultimately save money and time and improve public outcomes. The following list is not exhaustive, but it illustrates the issues that require equal participation and commitment by companies and their clients, including government agencies at the federal, state, and local levels: • Siloed people, workflows, applications, and processes that cause redundancy, reduce productivity, and result in information conflicts and increased project costs • Limited private investment in public infrastructure projects due to a track record of inconsistent performance in meeting project time/budget goals and a lack of transparency about the project pipeline process • Increasing data from smart technologies overwhelming our current infrastructure systems and, with no funding to address it, preventing the extraction and application of the newest and most valuable “56 percent of the surveyed CIOs noted capitalizing on internal data as the area in which they see the greatest potential for productivity growth.” “The methods, standards, and approaches that have served AEC/O firms well for many decades are now becoming outmoded and can actually stifle innovation in developing future buildings and infrastructure that can ultimately save money and time and improve public outcomes.” Internet-based technologies • Equally important, public policies at all levels of government that lock-in out- moded approaches to overall project delivery, including design and engineering, construction, as well as asset management of public infrastructure projects The three key areas that emerged
  12. 12. The Role of CEOs in the Era of Connection: Innovating America’s Future 12 from this discussion were security; internal data mining; and updating tools and technology. In an increasingly connected world, economic imperatives and resiliency im- peratives are coming together. Leaders in the AEC/O industry, including CIOs, have spent much time thinking about how innovative strategies in planning, design, and maintaining the asset can develop modern, resilient buildings and infrastruc- ture. Already, advanced technologies are available across the entire spectrum of development―from the opportunities big data provides to analyze more com- plex risks and problems to avoid wasting time and money, to BIM processes that can stretch investment dollars through- out the design and construction phases, along with introducing predictive asset management approaches to prolong the asset life once built. CIOs in the era of connection— connecting big data to business strategy It is clear from listening to the CIOs’ discussions and from the responses to the survey questions that connecting big data to their business strategy is key to success. And we must make sure that this process has a “human face” to it: big data must be useful and invite use, acceptance, open collaboration, and knowledge sharing, internally as well as externally, so it can foster innovations in client projects. Today all manner of things interconnect and relate to each other and other systems, both physically and digitally. We are on the brink of the biggest change since the industrial revolution. These changes are not only dramatic, but they are happening fast. More changes are coming in the next decade than many have experienced in their entire lifetime, and the CIO is right in the middle of these changes—and in some ways in the driver’s seat. CIOs must look at big data operating across three axes: business data opera- tions; project and engineering disciplines; and external reference data of clients. In this coming era of connection, the internal operations of what a CIO does remain the same, namely keep the lights on and the costs down while executing on a business strategy that connects and balances the needs of different departments. The objective, of course, is to keep the business relevant by constantly improving. More and more, CIOs will be experiencing expanded external facing roles and responsibilities. These include client facing, managing relationships, and managing competitiveness by innovating. For CIOs to really hit their stride in leading this change during the era of connection, as a group they need to start building discipline about what sources of data are relevant and how they perceive buckets of information and what they relate to, and connect all of the data sources to find out what value/meaning is out there to be utilized. Final summary and key takeaways The availability of large amounts of data and computing power (the cloud) means you can find expertise virtually and no longer physically, leading to the emergence of younger, lighter, nimbler competitors that can do things more quickly than their incumbents. This business transition is from inside to outside, where some of the best CIOs now come from the operations side instead of the technical side of businesses—a fact that demonstrates “It is clear from listening to the CIOs’ discussions and from the responses to the survey questions that connecting big data to their business strategy is key to success.”
  13. 13. The Role of CEOs in the Era of Connection: Innovating America’s Future 13 the expanded role expected of CIOs. The ability to use the cloud infrastructure and big data will you give you a short- term competitive advantage over those that don’t. It will be brief, however. While more must be figured out, here are some of the initial takeaways, and initial best practices, from CIOs that are good starting points to enter this era of connection and help connect big data to business strategy: • Aggregating data and making the correlations—it’s the key to big data • Emphasis on the social aspect of social media: humanizing colleagues as crowdsource contributors beyond their designated role • Gamification—the use of game technology to drive collaboration, to encourage people to buy into the system and engage • Strategic big data priorities backed by and originating with the CEO but driven by the CIO • Engagement not determined as much by the platform or the technology so much as the culture • Skills search—find similarities with clients, coworkers, and teams and map that talent • Generalizing demographics: In most enterprises today, deep technologi- cal sophistication is a characteristic of younger generations, yet these young people are nowhere near the CEO or boardroom. Look at ways organizations can work to fully grasp the opportuni- ties of these internal “technologists” when developing strategy and high-level decisions. • Take old structure and apply it to new technology to speed integra- tion and adaptation. For example, BYOT started as “bring your own telephone,” changed into “bring your own tablet,” and now is evolving into “bring your own laptop” for certain staff. This paradigm is enabled by the cloud. The organization can use existing trends as a way to mitigate the costs/impact of rapid techno- logical obsolescence; under a “bring your own” paradigm, the enterprise avoids procuring successive waves of hardware that become obsolete in a very short time, while extracting value from the devices that employees are buying for personal use anyway. • Borrow with honor. It is important for CIOs to be partially outward-facing and engage with customers: your customers often have good ideas/ practices regarding information and technology challenges that you also face, and they can be a source of solutions that you can “borrow with honor” and implement in your own company. “Look for the one innovator all the time— someone, or something, that gives us a competitive advantage. Our CEOs are focused and listening to us.” • In this high-touch environment, there is sharing of information and systems we never expected to share before. Identify who are the key sharers and use them as evangelists, internally at first but externally as well, to help keep the momentum of change. The overall best advice for CIOs who want to lead the change for our firms and our industry in this era of connec- tion was stated by one CIO in the dis- cussion: “Look for the one innovator all the time—someone, or something, that gives us a competitive advantage. Our CEOs are focused and listening to us.”
  14. 14. The Role of CEOs in the Era of Connection: Innovating America’s Future 14 Appendix A – CIO Survey results
  15. 15. The Role of CEOs in the Era of Connection: Innovating America’s Future 15
  16. 16. The Role of CEOs in the Era of Connection: Innovating America’s Future 16
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  28. 28. Autodesk and the Autodesk logo are registered trademarks or trademarks of Autodesk, Inc., and/or its subsidiaries and/or affiliates in the USA and/or other countries. All other brand names, product names, or trademarks belong to their respective holders. Autodesk reserves the right to alter product and services offerings, and specifications and pricing at any time without notice, and is not responsible for typographical or graphical errors that may appear in this document. © 2015 Autodesk, Inc. All rights reserved. Brought to you by Survey results from CG-LA Infrastructure 2015 CIO survey.

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