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Finding paradisec: how Paradisec has made their data findable

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Nick Thieberger, Director of Paradisec, presents how Paradisec has made their data findable via rich metadata, identifiers through Research Data Australia and disciplinary discovery portals.

On YouTube: https://youtu.be/hn3lBvLCWp8
Full Webinar on YouTube: https://youtu.be/vn2pr2dGzCs
Transcript: https://www.slideshare.net/AustralianNationalDataService/transcript-1-fair-intro-into-fair-and-f-for-findable

Published in: Education
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Finding paradisec: how Paradisec has made their data findable

  1. 1. Finding PARADISEC Nick Thieberger School of Languages and Linguistics University of Melbourne PARADISEC acknowledges and pays respect to the Gadigal people of the Eora Nation, the Ngunawal and the Woiwurrung
  2. 2. Pacific and Regional Archive for Digital Sources in Endangered Cultures (PARADISEC) 1,103 languages 99 countries 409 collections 18,286 items 162,335 files 7,595 hours audio 750 hours video 31.4 TB of files As of 22/8/17
  3. 3. Findability of primary research materials Catalog provides minimal required fields OAI / DC – based metadata
  4. 4. Online catalog
  5. 5. Finding connections Vanuatu Kaljoral Senta – digitising tapes and provision of safe ‘blind’ backup of parts of their collection University of New Caledonia – digitising of mouldy field recordings Solomon Islands National Museum – digitising analog tapes Tjibaou Centre - New Caledonia - discussion of metadata and archiving methods Institute of Papua New Guinea Studies - provision of CD copies of tapes Divine Word University – Madang, PNG – digitising cassettes and open reels
  6. 6. Findability of primary research materials Findability - how easy is it to learn of the existence of the records? What level of granularity does the finding aid provide? PARADISEC’s focus is on cultural materials that are both a base for research and a local community resource (family history, traditional heritage records) Findability Least to most
  7. 7. Findability of primary research materials Most primary records are kept by the original researchers in their office or home Findability = 0/10, maybe 1/10 if colleagues know about their existence We often infer the existence of records from published work that describes fieldwork, and then go looking for it
  8. 8. Findability of primary research materials We can add records to a catalog to announce the existence of analog or digital records and to provide language identifiers (finability 3/10) Findability increases (accessibility is still virtually zero)
  9. 9. Findability of primary research materials We provide images of manuscripts, and similarly, provide dynamic media with no textual transcript Findability increases (5/10)
  10. 10. Findability of primary research materials We provide streaming media with a textual transcript Findability increases at the level of individual utterances (8/10)
  11. 11. Findability of primary research materials We embed metadata into the header of wav files, creating a BWF (Broadcast Wave Format) file <REPORT> <BEXTDATA> <DESCRIPTION> Language: "Panim" pnr; Country: PG; Notes: Elicitation of Z'graggen wordlist; permission conversation. Forms a single session with DD1-004 (the recorder's filesize was exceeded so it broke up the recording). [Genre] Elicitation, permission [Length] 1:02:08 [Filename] 2010.07.18-pnr-SS- Elicitation1.Part1.and.Permission.wav [Annotated in] Panim 1:1-27 [Other lgs] Tok Pisin [Speaker(s)] Segena Som [Subject lg] Panim. </DESCRIPTION> <ORIGINATOR>DD</ORIGINATOR> <ORIGINATIONDATE>2010-07-18</ORIGINATIONDATE> </BEXTDATA> <QUALITYREPORT> <BASICDATA> <ARCHIVENUMBER>DD1-003</ARCHIVENUMBER> <TITLE>SS Elicitation 1-1, permission</TITLE> <OPERATOR>NFG</OPERATOR> </BASICDATA> <QUALITYEVENTS> <EVENT> <TYPE>IngestNotes0</TYPE> <COMMENT/> <SAMPLECOUNT>0</SAMPLECOUNT> </EVENT> </QUALITYEVENTS> </QUALITYREPORT> </REPORT>
  12. 12. Findability of primary research materials DOI provided for all files, items, and collections Persistent Identifier
  13. 13. API, metadata feeds: http://catalog.paradisec.org.au/apidoc
  14. 14. API, metadata feeds picked up by ANDS, OAI services, Open Language Archives Community (OLAC), TROVE, etc https://researchdata.ands.org.au/contributors/paradisec
  15. 15. API, metadata feeds picked up by ANDS, OAI services, Open Language Archives Community (OLAC), TROVE, etc. http://search.language-archives.org/search.html?fq=archive_facet%3A%22Pacific%20And%20Regional%20Archive%20for%20Digital%20Sources%20in%20Endangered%20Cultures%20%28PARADISEC%29%22
  16. 16. API, metadata feeds picked up by ANDS, OAI services, Open Language Archives Community (OLAC), TROVE, etc. https://vlo.clarin.eu/search?1&fq=collection:Pacific+And+Regional+Archive+for+Digital+Sources+in+Endangered+Cultures+%28PARADISEC%29
  17. 17. API, metadata feeds picked up by ANDS, OAI services, Open Language Archives Community (OLAC), TROVE, etc. https://www.worldcat.org/search?q=paradisec&fq=&dblist=638&start=21&qt=next_page
  18. 18. Enriching metadata http://www.paradisec.org.au/blog/2017/06/improving-the-metadata-of-papua-new-guinea-collections/
  19. 19. Promoting the collection Glossopticon : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X2iimqq7LS8
  20. 20. Finding our content in Melanesia
  21. 21. Finding PARADISEC Creating a standard metadata set Applying as much metadata to items as possible Making primary records available once a search finds them Publishing metadata for harvest by both discipline-specific and more general services Publicising the existence of the collection Engaging with researchers (training in data managment and collection building) Engaging with community agencies in the Pacific region
  22. 22. Australian Research Council – LIEF grants LE110100142, LE0560711, LE0453247 ARC DP0450342, DP0984419, & FT140100214

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