Austin Coaches Handbook (2)

0 views

Published on

My Coaching Handbook.

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
0
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
5
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Austin Coaches Handbook (2)

  1. 1. Coach Burns Coaching Handbook Austin.burns@iwc.edu 2012 Iowa Wesleyan CollegeNovember 2010 Coaching Handbook Page 1
  2. 2. Austin Burns Iowa Wesleyan College Physical Education Major Endorsements – Health and Special Education Men’s Basketball Program – Three years of college Attended IAHPERD National PE convention in 2010 Attended IAHPERD convention of Iowa in 2011/2012: Awarded one of two scholarships in the state for IAHPERD Ongoing field experience in Special Education and Physical Education. Dean’s List – 3 semesters Community Old Threshers Reunion – Volunteer work for the Old Threshers Reunion in Mount Pleasant, IA. Duties include: Directing traffic, trash pickup, setting up and tearing down the stage for bands along with spotlighting the bands. Hurricane Katrina Relief Effort- Biloxi, Mississippi Austin Burns Student Ambassadors- Giving tours to prospective IWC students Iowa Wesleyan College Lifeguard – Marengo Park District, Marengo, IL Austin.burns@iwc.edu T-Ball Coach – Belvidere Park District, Belvidere, IL: Teaching and coaching kids ages 4-10 Fifth Generation Educator Waterfront Counselor – Ramapo for Children, Rhinebeck, NY: Two summers experience. A camp for kids with special needs ages 4-20.Philosophy of Education Club M Advisory Council – Providing advice to head member of Club MStudents in today’s education need to be prepared at the highest level to lead on what can be done to improve the program.America into a positive future. Children should be taught to become successful Student Life Committee - Informed on certain campus issues andwhile creating their own beliefs and opinions. Teachers can guide students to expected to offer advice on issues.explore multiple solutions to a problem while thinking independently. Studentsshould always be guided in a positive direction and be given trust by their teachers.Every educator should create and keep a positive and energized learningenvironment.Mentoring Physical Education for the StudentsClub M – Mentoring Program – I go into the Mount Pleasant public schools to I want my students to learn many physical activities as possible not onlymentor identified students that need a positive male role model. Generally the few main sports in America, but outdoor activities as well as gamesconverse, eat lunch and go to recess. that students may never get to experience in a common school. I want toVolunteered in Reading Specialist classroom: I helped improve students reading make sure each and every student is learning something new andskills in an elementary setting. enjoying their physical education experience. Each student will beHelped in K/1 classroom one semester: Taught PE one period each day then math participating and enjoying the activities. Each student will be included inskills the other period. my class and have a feeling of empowerment. I want all of my students to be comfortable in a physical education environment.Expectation for Physical Education Coaching PhilosophyI hope to expose each of my students to as much physical education as possible. Respect on the court goes both ways; what you project – is what youStudents will learn to be leaders, how to cooperate, and principles of teamwork. become; basketball is not about self – but the team, develop trust, let goImportance of having a lifetime full of exercising will be stressed upon my students. of your egos, build passion and a positive work ethic on the court; this isI hope that everyone finds something they enjoy about physical education. what you will project throughout your life.IWC Life Skills Coaching ObjectivesValuing all coaches and players not only for their abilities but for themselves. Being I will prepare each student athlete for success in life. Positive characterknowledgeable of the sport is essential to becoming an effective coach. will be instilled within the program. Teams in which I coach will reflectCommunication on and off the court between coaches to coaches, athletes to that of a positive and ethical team. As a players’ coach, I will giveathletes, coaches to athletes and vice versa is imperative for an effective program. frequent feedback and reinforcement whether it be positive orAs a coach I am a teacher and mentor. constructive. I will coach on a principle of being caring but firm. November 2010 Coaching Handbook Page 2
  3. 3. Table of Contents PageForward………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………4Preface……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….4Coaching Philosophy………………….……….…………………….……………………………………………………….5Coaching Objectives……………………………………………………………………………………………………………6Coaching Style…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….7Coaching for Character………….……………………………………………………………………………………………7Coaching Diverse Athletes…………….……………………………………………………………………………………8Communicating with Athletes………………….…………………………………………………………………………8Motivating Athletes……………………………………………………………………………………………………………9Student Athlete Conduct…….………………………….………………………………………………………………….9The Games Approach…………………………………………………………………………………………………………10Teaching Technical Skills…………………………………………………………………………………………………...10Teaching Tactical Skills……………………………………………………………………………………………………….10Planning for Teaching…………………………………………………………………………………………………………12Training Basics……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………11Training for Energy Fitness…………………………………………………………………………………………………11Training for Muscular Fitness……………………………………………………………………………………………..12Fueling Athletes…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………12Battling Drugs…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….12Team Management…………………………………………………………………………………………………………..12Relationship Management………………………………………………………………………………………………...13Risk Management………………………………………………………………………………………………………………13“Coaching the Mental Game”…………………………………………………………………………………………….13November 2010 Coaching Handbook Page 3
  4. 4. ForwardCoach Burns and the Iowa Wesleyan basketball program amaze people game after game. Coach Burnsprides himself on being a players coach, and I believe that is a huge thing for a basketball program. Ihave heard how players love playing for him. He looks out for his players and what is best for them. Heputs them in positions to be successful, but he makes sure they understand why they are there in thefirst place. Coach Tackett- Iowa Wesleyan Football CoachCoach Burns not only knows the X and Os of the game, but the little intricacies that go along with beinga head basketball coach. He is very detailed and meticulous at his craft. He has shown to be a verygood leader of men, and his record demonstrates this. Coach Ray -Iowa Wesleyan Football Coach PrefaceI am presenting this coaching handbook in an aim to explain the methods that I coach through. I wantall of my athletes, parents, Principal, Athletic Director, and Superintendent to know the ways in which Icoach my teams. This handbook will guide you to understand and be a part of the program as well. Ihope that my coaching handbook answers any questions about ways in which my teams are coached.“Winning isn’t everything, but wanting to win is” - Vince Lombardi Austin BurnsNovember 2010 Coaching Handbook Page 4
  5. 5. Coaching PhilosophyAs a coach, I will keep values in life and coaching consistent with my philosophy. Student Athletes willknow and understand my coaching philosophy. I follow my beliefs and principles in life when I sculpt mycoaching philosophy. It is essential to know who I am and what kind of coach I want to be in order tofully develop my philosophy. I must be aware of my strengths and weaknesses as a coach. My coachingphilosophy contains my major objectives, beliefs, and principles that will help us achieve theseobjectives.My Philosophy:Respect on the court goes both ways; what you project – is what you become; basketball is not aboutself – but the team, develop trust, let go of your egos, build passion and a positive work ethic on thecourt; this is what you will project throughout your life.I believe that trust must be established between all members on a team in order for a successfulprogram. Your actions as a player or coach on and off the field show what kind of person you are. Theway you present yourself in practice and during contests shows that you are as a person. The game ofbasketball is not about the individual but the team. Setting egos aside and building trust with oneanother on a team builds an environment that is conducive for success on the court and in life. I hopethat my players have a passion for the sport and a relentless work ethic to go along with that passion.November 2010 Coaching Handbook Page 5
  6. 6. Coaching ObjectivesMy objectives as a coach are congruent with my coaching philosophy. Student Athletes will understandmy coaching objectives. The three main objectives of coaching are: To win, to help young people havefun, and to help young people develop physically, psychologically, and socially. Society’s objective issolely “to win”. I will not lose sight of the objectives to help young people develop and have fun. Thiscan be done if I get caught up in society’s one and only objective. Winning will happen more frequentlyand in the long term once the objective of developing and exciting young people is established.“Athletes First, Winning Second”. It is important to make positive moral decisions as a coach and thenalso to guide athletes to make positive decisions.My Coaching Objectives:I will prepare each student athlete for success in life. Positive character will be instilled within the program. My teams will reflect positive and ethical morals. I will give feedback collectively and individually. I will coach on the principle of being caring but firm. To WinNovember 2010 Coaching Handbook Page 6
  7. 7. Coaching StyleI will coach by the cooperative style. Student Athletes will understand and perform by the cooperativestyle. I share decision making with my athletes. This does not mean that I will be the players’ “buddy”. Ibelieve in coaching with my athletes instead of coaching down to them. The focus of the cooperativestyle is teaching the athletes. Athletes will become independent and responsible through thecooperative style. I delegate authority while providing leadership. Structure is provided allowing theathletes to achieve success. The team is their team, not MY team. I want my student athletes have asense of empowerment towards their team. Although, this is their team, as a coach I am the leadershipprovider and authoritative figure. I guide my athletes to perform and achieve success. During toughtimes in coaching, I do not blame my players. During times of success I put that praise on my players. Coaching for CharacterI will demonstrate sportsmanship, create a moral team environment, teach positive decision making,model appropriate character, and reward good behavior. Student-Athletes will know that they areexpected to be players of character.It is crucial for me as a coach as well as my players to show respect to opponents, officials, teammates,and the game – sportsmanship. I follow these three steps in coaching for character – Step 1: Identifyprinciples of character, Step 2: Teach the principles of character and Step 3: Provide opportunities topractice moral behavior.I model appropriate character at all times. While I teach positive character it is essential that I modelthe appropriate character that I want my athletes to display. Athletes are observing me as a coach at alltimes which makes it vital for me to model character. The athletes know what the consequences are forfraying from positive character. These athletes know the expectations that are set for them in publicand private. They understand the consequences for displaying anything that is not expected of them. Iteach ethical decision making to my athletes. This may mean no communication to referees, takingconstructive criticism/directions, displaying good sportsmanship on and off the court, and representingthe school positively. They know that they may not have the privilege to play a sport if they do notdisplay ethical decision making or the character that is expected of them. DiversityNovember 2010 Coaching Handbook Page 7
  8. 8. I will coach ALL athletes fairly. All student athletes will know they that will be coached fairly. I believethat all athletes deserve to be treated fairly regardless of gender, age, maturity level or culture. I willwork to understand the backgrounds and cultures of my athletes to better understand them. I alsounderstand the age and maturity level of my athletes to the best of my ability which helps us besuccessful as a team. At all levels there is a wide range of physical and maturity levels in studentathletes. Student athletes grow at very sporadic rate. I understand of the fact that athletes mature andgrow at different rates. While I understand this, I treat all athletes fairly regardless of physical size andability. My collective team of character respects all aspects of diversity. CommunicatingI will practice and embrace cooperative communication between my athletes and coaches. StudentAthletes will communicate cooperatively with players and coaches. I will send messages to my athletesfrequently. I also make sure that I receive messages from my players. This communication is effectiveand follows the respect aspect of my philosophy. When sending messages to my players, I always makesure that the message is clear for them to understand. My athletes will know that they are to askquestions if they are unsure of anything. The directions I give to athletes are clear and player input isreceived. I am a source of information to athletes on my team. I communicate through the positiveapproach which correlates with my cooperative style of coaching. I encourage athletes when need be.Feedback is given to my athletes appropriately, and praise is given to athletes who demonstrate thedesired behavior.November 2010 Coaching Handbook Page 8
  9. 9. Motivating Student AthletesI will make sure that my player’s needs are met so that they will be motivated. Student athlete will thinklike a winner. I understand that athletes’ needs are to have fun and to feel worthy. As a coach it isessential for me to meet my athletes’ needs in order for my athletes to be motivated. Sport must bemade for the athletes. Athletes need the high stimulation of intensity to have fun. There is energy ofexcitement in my gymnasium where the athletes are stimulated which allows them to have fun. Allathletes need to feel worthy. Therefore, each athlete is motivated by success. I create an environmentwhere success is acknowledged and failure is not punished but consequenced. I have my athletes createindividual goals at the beginning of the season. I acknowledge the successes and progresses of eachathlete’s goals. Student Athlete ConductI will use positive discipline to manage athletes’ behavior. Student athlete will know that they will beinstructed and trained rather than be feared of mistakes. They also know that I do not fray from theexpectations and consequences that are set for them. It is my duty to always instruct or demonstrate toteams the correct way to perform a skill. I instruct the skill, train the skill over, and correct the way thatthe skill was performed. This instruction goes for on and off the court. Positive discipline is aconstructive approach to coaching that tie in with the cooperative style.John Wooden said that “If you’re not making mistakes, then you’re not doing anything”. My athletesare reminded of this principle.The six steps of preventative discipline are instilled through my basketball program. The first step ofpreventative discipline is creating the right team culture. I do this by expecting the best character anddecision making out of my athletes. I hold team meetings frequently. Team meetings: mandatoryparent and student first meeting, athlete goals meeting, after practice, before community activities,times of struggle and success, etc. The team expectations are handed out to each player and theirparents at the mandatory meeting. Consequences for fraying away from these expectations arethoroughly explained. Team off-season, pre-season, practice plans, away trips, and game days all haveroutines that my student athletes and I follow. Practices are exciting because student athletes need thatstimulation of excitement in order to be motivated to succeed. Praise is given to athletes and the teamas a whole when they model the appropriate skill, character, and winning attitude.November 2010 Coaching Handbook Page 9
  10. 10. Games ApproachI will teach my athletes the proper technical skills in order for them to be successful. I will not onlycoach the technical part, but the tactical part as well. We practice game like situations as well as specificskills needed to perform well. We practice more and more game like situations as the season goesalong. I do stick to the technical skills of my players getting more than a hundred game shots up eachpractice along with one ball handling drill team wide. Coaching through the games approach preparesmy athletes to succeed during contests. Teaching Technical SkillsI will teach technical skills by first developing a motor program. Then allow my players to go through thethree learning stages: mental stage, practice stage, and automatic stage. As a coach I will first have tointroduce the skill, demonstrate the skill, have the athletes practice the skill, and then correct the errors. Teaching Tactical SkillsI will instruct the tactics, strategy, and game plan to my players. Student Athlete will develop tacticalknowledge, decision making skills and perceptual skills. Tactics are the plan to gain advantage in acontest. Strategy is the plan of action. Game plan is an application of the strategy to a game. I teachthe rules of the game to my athletes. Athletes must know the rules before skill can be performed. Idevelop the game plan and team strategies around the players’ team and individual goals as well as skillsets of athletes. I use various strategies to improve decision-making skills in my athletes. I encourageathletes to watch basketball played at a higher level during their free time. I may require my athletes towatch a certain collegiate team play that demonstrates decision making that I want to see in my team. Imay also require them to watch games where teams will be playing a defense, or offensive set that willbe similar to what we run. At the beginning of the season, I tape a scrimmage in an exact game likesituation. The players know that this scrimmage is being taped and gives them a chance to observethemselves. I analyze the film, watch the film with the team, and provide feedback collectively andindividually with my team. I use both blocked and variable practice in different parts of practice. I givemy athletes individual and collective feedback but do not overload them with feedback.November 2010 Coaching Handbook Page 10
  11. 11. Planning for TeachingI develop seasonal plans as well as practice plans. I first identify the skills that my athletes need. Eachindividual and collective team has different skill sets. I identify these individual as well as collective skillsin order to create the best seasonal plan for my team. Specific to practice; I review what skills need tobe taught or reviewed then implement them into the practice plan. It is imperative for me to know myathletes well. I build positive relationships with my athletes for many reasons. A few of these reasonsare to understand the best ways they are coached; it is a part of being a self-actualized coach, and tocreate a common respect. I know their goals, mindset, and skill level which helps me put them in thebest position to succeed. In developing my seasonal plan, I analyze the resources that are available tomy program for that year. In developing individual practice plans, I analyze the resources available, thetime of season, and individual player situations to create my practice plan. I establish which items onthe practice plan are of the highest importance. We may need to spend extra time on certain itemsduring practice. I coach through a positive cooperative style. I analyze time, season, injuries,equipment, materials, skills needed, upcoming games, and review the previous practice when creatingmy practice plan. Training BasicsI know simple anatomy and physiology. My players will understand that the training program is basedon the training principles that I have learned in my experiences. I always explain training activities to myplayers so they know exactly why we are doing the work out. My players know that I have years ofexperience in the art of training for basketball. All players are required to wear ankle braces to practiceand games. The athletic trainer will tape any and all players’ ankles until ankle braces are acquired. Training for Energy FitnessMy fitness training program places each athlete in a position to succeed. My fitness training program isused in respect to the energy demands of the sport. I assess and monitor the fitness levels of each ofmy athletes. I test my athletes’ aerobic fitness and anaerobic capacity during the pre-season. Thismeans sprint testing and mile run testing. Fitness testing puts athletes in a position to push their traininglevels to the maximum. I have spent years participating in various training programs and have seenfirsthand the benefits to basketball players in each training program. I am bringing this knowledge withme into the coaching profession.November 2010 Coaching Handbook Page 11
  12. 12. Training for Muscular FitnessI realize how the muscles work and what their duties are. Our athletic training program accommodatesthe fitness level in the sport of basketball. I understand that as the season goes on that my athletes’muscles may be not as strong as they used to be. I stay away from over training my athletes. I do nottrain my players as hard each practice at the end of the season. Therefore, I place more emphasis onstretching exercises later on in the season. The off season and pre season are the optimal times wheremuscular fitness is emphasized heavily. The middle to end of the season is a time where emphasis isplaced mostly on the games approach. Muscular fitness is absent at this time as athletes need theirbodies to recover after the beating their bodies take during contests. Fueling AthletesAs your coach, I know how to provide proper nutrition to my athletes through prior knowledge on thesix basic nutrients: carbohydrate, protein, fat, vitamins, minerals, and water. I know the role ofsupplements in an athlete’s diet. I know how to teach my athletes how to maintain, gain, and loseweight through supplementing nutrition. My athletes will be provided information on the proper fuelsrequired to improve performance. Battling DrugsAs your coach, I take an antidrug stance. My student athletes understand the expectation of being drug-free. My student athletes will sign the “team policy for drug use” form as well as the form the schoolprovides. Hopefully the positive team culture and intense practices will deter my athletes from usingdrugs. Each year athletes go into the local elementary school and teach young students the negativeeffects that drugs have on people. Team ManagementI will be the head manager of all team aspects. I will fill my coaching staff with what is needed asdetermined by me. I will always make sure that we have enough money funded for us. Fundraising willbe a part of the program each year. At the beginning of the season we will have a free throw contestwhich will help produce some funds to the program. The athletes will find people to donate a certainamount of money to the athlete for every free throw he or she makes. The athletes will then shoot 50free throws in practice the following week. Students will then collect money from those who chose tosponsor that athlete’s free throws. The facilities we use are safe and clean to use. Athletes and teamare taken care of in all aspects.November 2010 Coaching Handbook Page 12
  13. 13. Relationship MasteryI work to master the four interpersonal skills: knowing myself, trusting others, resolving conflicts,accepting/supporting others, and effective communication. Mastery of these skills helps when dealingwith fellow coaches, medical personnel, media, parents, officials, and sports administrators. My playerswill also learn how to effectively manage relationships through the four interpersonal skills. Risk ManagementI keep athletes safe. I keep athletes safe identifying, evaluating, and implementing approaches to limitathletes’ risks in every athletic activity. I view my duty as head coach to keep all athletes mentally,healthily, and physically safe. “Coaching the Mental Game” by H.A. DorfmanAs your coach, I will be self-actualized. Student-Athletes will know the style and type of coach that I am.My players know that as a cooperative style coach that we are in it as a team. They know that blamewill never be thrown on them. They also know that high expectations are set for them. Excellence isexpected. As a self-actualized coach I realize that I am the decision maker of the team. I delegateauthority to my assistant coaches and captains at times. I can project a sense of humor when thesituation need be. My athletes will know that I am concerned for their well-being on and off the court. Ibuild and have positive relationships with my athletes.November 2010 Coaching Handbook Page 13
  14. 14. BibliographyDorfman, H.A. Coaching the Mental Game. N.p.: n.p., n.d. Print.Martens, Rainer. Successful Coaching. 4th ed. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics, 1997. Print. Dow Athletic Handbook Power Points Daily Lesson PlansNovember 2010 Coaching Handbook Page 14

×