The migrants market
Latest evolutions and outlook
March 2014
REPORT
24, rue Salomon de Rothschild - 92288 Suresnes - FRANC...
2
The migrants market: latest evolutions and outlook
Contents
Introduction...................................................
3
In light of new initiatives concerning the migrants market launched over Europe in
the past 3 years, Kurt Salmon and Efm...
4
The migrants market: latest evolutions and outlook
Global overview of the migrant market
According to the United Nations...
5
In addition, according to OECD, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development,
figures also show a shift si...
6
The migrants market: latest evolutions and outlook
Worldwide remittance evolution
Where the money goes
This map shows wh...
7
This trend is also relevant in Europe, where remittances from the Benelux countries, the United
Kingdom and Spain are st...
8
The migrants market: latest evolutions and outlook
Remittances to Eastern Europe and Central Asia are estimated to have ...
9
New barriers to remittances will force banks to adapt their business model
Migration and remittances are being featured ...
10
The migrants market: latest evolutions and outlook
Market competition for providing remittance services is a key driver...
11
New regulatory requirements appear to be going to make remittance transfers to other
countries more transparent and rel...
12
The migrants market: latest evolutions and outlook
In this challenging and competitive market, we studied, through inte...
13
BNPP approach towards migrants: develop acquisition in migrants’ countries of origin
(Morocco, Algeria and Tunisia) and...
14
The migrants market: latest evolutions and outlook
A genuine offer to reward customer loyalty to the Group with dedicat...
15
A complete distribution and communication organization has been set up by BNP Paribas in those
home/host entities to su...
16
The migrants market: latest evolutions and outlook
Bankamiz: A new Deutsche Bank division for Turkish people
Overview a...
17
Bankamiz, which means ‘our bank’ in Turkish, an exclusive offer dedicated to Turkish residents, was
launched by Deutsch...
18
The migrants market: latest evolutions and outlook
An in-depth understanding of needs and cultural code to propose an a...
19
Proximity and trust to attract and retain customers
Bankamiz understood that reaching Turkish people implies that the r...
20
The migrants market: latest evolutions and outlook
Extrabanca: the first pure player in the migrants market
Overview an...
21
Extrabanca’s model relies on friendlier staff, products tailored to immigrants and longer opening
hours (including Satu...
22
The migrants market: latest evolutions and outlook
Migrants are often considered as a marginal segment, highly risky, f...
23
An original distribution model to attract customers and promote the brand image
Extrabanca’s brand image is based on em...
24
The migrants market: latest evolutions and outlook
These case studies clearly show how approaches rely on purpose:
• Co...
25
The migrant segment, a successful experience
of new trends in retail banking
From ‘mass-marketing’ to ‘niche-marketing’...
26
The migrants market: latest evolutions and outlook
From selling to counselling…and financial education
The migrant expe...
27
New values to guide offers, customer relationships and distribution
The values that migrants look for in their relation...
28
The migrants market: latest evolutions and outlook
Since former migrants study, institutional figures have confirmed th...
29
Acknowledgements
For their contribution to the case study, the authors would like to thank the following experts:
• Séb...
30
The migrants market: latest evolutions and outlook
31
About us
As a global not-for-profit organisation, Efma brings together more than 3,300 retail financial services
compan...
32
The migrants market: latest evolutions and outlook
The migrants market
Latest evolutions and outlook
March 2014
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Kurt Salmon - Migrants market - A.Arkam, H. Cambournac

448 views

Published on

In light of our market watch and interviews with experts, Kurt Salmon point of view provides banks with some key points to succeed in targeting this kind of market

Published in: Marketing
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
448
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Kurt Salmon - Migrants market - A.Arkam, H. Cambournac

  1. 1. The migrants market Latest evolutions and outlook March 2014 REPORT 24, rue Salomon de Rothschild - 92288 Suresnes - FRANCE Tél. : +33 (0)1 57 32 87 00 / Fax : +33 (0)1 57 32 87 87 Web : www.carrenoir.com INEUM Kurt Salmon INE_06_0409_Logo_CMYK 14/12/2010 QUADRICHROMIE M100 Y100
  2. 2. 2 The migrants market: latest evolutions and outlook Contents Introduction....................................................................................................................3 Market evolution.............................................................................................................4 Global overview of the migrant market.....................................................................4 Worldwide remittance evolution...............................................................................6 New barriers to remittances will force banks to adapt their business model...................9 European business models: three different approaches to the market...................................12 BNPP: create cross-entity synergies.........................................................................12 Bankamiz: A new Deutsche Bank division for Turkish people.....................................16 Extrabanca: the first pure player in the migrants market............................................20 The migrant segment, a successful experience of new trends in retail banking......................25 From ‘mass-marketing’ to ‘niche-marketing’..............................................................25 From selling to counselling…and financial education................................................26 New values to guide offers, customer relationships and distribution............................27 Conclusion...................................................................................................................28 Acknowledgements.......................................................................................................29 About us......................................................................................................................31
  3. 3. 3 In light of new initiatives concerning the migrants market launched over Europe in the past 3 years, Kurt Salmon and Efma decided to launch a new study dedicated to this market. Indeed, with more than $400 billion remittances in 2013, the potential of this market is no longer to be demonstrated. And if we are to consider the conclusions of our previous study, the financial potential of this market goes far beyond money transfer. If we take a look at the market in 2013, it seems that several European banks, including very big ones, fully realized the potential of this market. Thus, the first part of this study presents recent evolutions of the market. It is based on our extended research capacity, permanent watch and solid benchmarks we use for our daily delivery. For the second chapter, a targeted focus on successful case studies, we selected among our network three retail banks with extreme positioning towards Migrants but complimentary approaches to provide a big-picture view of the sector. • BNP Paribas, which addressed this market to build synergies across its entities, bring value to its retail customers and encourage cross-selling. • Deutsche Bank, which launched a complete affinity offering for the Turkish community in Germany, considering it as a full segment. • Extrabanca, the first pure player in Europe dedicated to migrants, which proposes a model that aims at serving all foreign communities living in Italy, both families and businesses. In addition, it seemed that these experiences could provide few clues to the three main retail bankers’ current questions: • How to go from ‘mass-marketing’ to ‘niche-marketing’? • How to evolve the ‘client – advisor’ relationship? • What is the future of banking distribution network? This last part gets the most of our business analysis competency. This study aims to provide clear outlook and perspective for this market, and gives dedicated advice to address the retail banking segment in an innovative way, given new constraints and opportunities. Aude Arkam, Manager, Kurt Salmon Joel Nadjar, Global Partner, Kurt Salmon Patrick Desmarès, Secretary General, Efma Introduction
  4. 4. 4 The migrants market: latest evolutions and outlook Global overview of the migrant market According to the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs (UN-DESA), international migration represented 232 million people in 2013 (or 3.2 per cent of the World’s population) and $414 billion remittances compared with 154 million people and less than $50 billion in 1990. According to the latest figures, the World’s largest corridor for international migration remains that between the United States and Mexico. The United States remains the most popular migrant destination, with Mexican expatriates representing more than 38% of the total number of migrants worldwide. Within the top 10 communities of migrants, only one corridor, migrants from Turkey to Germany, is in Europe. Nevertheless, within Europe, the United Kingdom, France and Spain still host a number of immigrant communities as a result of work migration and geographic routes with North Africa. Market evolution Top migration corridors Number of migrants (millions) 0 Mexico-UnitedStates Bangladesh-India Turkey-Germany China-HongKongSAR India-UnitedArabEmirates China-UnitedStates Philippines-UnitedStates Afghanistan-Iran India-UnitedStates PuertoRico-UnitedStates 2 4 6 8 10 12 11.6 3.3 2.7 2.2 2.2 1.7 1.7 1.7 1.7 1.7 Source: World Bank 2011
  5. 5. 5 In addition, according to OECD, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, figures also show a shift since 2000, with South – North and South – South migration (migration between developing countries) at about 82 million international migrants. The volume of South – South migration is now greater than migration from the South to high-income countries. This growth was mainly driven by the increasing demand for foreign labour in the Gulf countries (United Arab Emirates) and in Southeast Asian countries with rapidly growing economies, such as Malaysia, Singapore and Thailand. Contrary to expectations, and according to the World Bank study, the global crisis did not result in the widespread return of migrants or declining remittances to developing countries. Destination of migrants from the South 44% 14% 42% High-income non-OECD High-income OECD South Source: World Bank 2011
  6. 6. 6 The migrants market: latest evolutions and outlook Worldwide remittance evolution Where the money goes This map shows where some of the $500bn of remittance money sent home by migrants across the world in 2011, went Source: The Guardian Despite a modest decline in remittance inflows to developing countries in 2008, such flows have remained more resilient compared with private debt and equity flows and foreign direct investment. From 2009, the pace of growth reached its pre-crisis level (more than 5% annual growth), with recorded remittance flows to developing countries reaching an estimated $401 billion in 2012, a growth of 5.3% compared with 2011. According to a recent outlook, remittances to developing countries are expected to accelerate to 8.8% growth on average during 2013-2015.
  7. 7. 7 This trend is also relevant in Europe, where remittances from the Benelux countries, the United Kingdom and Spain are still increasing dramatically, with an average of 8% growth between 2010 and 2011. Remittances and other resource flows to developing countries (US$ billion) 700 600 500 400 300 200 100 0 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013e 2014f 2015f 2016f FDI Remittances Pvt debt and portfolio equity ODA Source: World Development Indicators and World Bank Devlopment Prospects Group EU remittance outflows (€ billions, 2011) Evolution since 2010 Germany 16 + 7% United Kingdom 17.2 + 10% France 14.8 + 6% Spain 14.1 + 9% Italy 8.9 + 8% Austria 3.8 + 2% Belgium 3.8 + 11% Netherland 3.6 + 7% Denmark 1.3 + 6% Luxembourg 0.7 + 11% Source: World Bank 2011
  8. 8. 8 The migrants market: latest evolutions and outlook Remittances to Eastern Europe and Central Asia are estimated to have fallen by 3.9% in US dollar terms (–2% in Euros considering its depreciation), to about $40 billion in 2012. For receiving countries, a key factor behind the resilience in remittances is the diversification of migrant destinations. Some studies show that the more diversified the destinations and the labor markets for migrants, the more resilient the remittances sent by migrants. Top 10 recipients of migrant remittances (r billion, 2012e) 0 India China Philippines Mexico Nigeria Egypt Bangladesh Pakistan Vietnam Lebanon 20 40 60 51.1 44.4 17.8 17.0 15.5 15.5 10.4 8.9 7.4 5.2 Source: World Bank 2013 A closer look at developing countries by region reveals substantial variations both within and between regions. In 2012, recorded remittance flows to the Middle East and North Africa and South Asia expanded rapidly, while Eastern Europe and Central Asia experienced a decline. Flows to Latin America and the Caribbean, East Asia and Pacific, and Sub-Saharan Africa were broadly unchanged or slightly positive in 2012.
  9. 9. 9 New barriers to remittances will force banks to adapt their business model Migration and remittances are being featured in ongoing discussions on the Millennium Development Goals and the Post-2015 agenda. Actions are being implemented to drive down the transaction prices for remitting money Besides economic and social factors, exchange rates and oil prices, another obstacle to growth of remittance flows is the high transaction cost for remitting money. Remittance fees averaged 7.5% during the third quarter of 2012 in the top 20 remittance corridors, although there is substantial variation across countries. For example, in large remittance-source countries, such as the GCC (Gulf Cooperation Council), the United States and the United Kingdom, the average price was around 5%, while in Germany it was 15%. The average remittance price for Sub-Saharan Africa was 12.4%, the highest among all developing regions. Remittance prices were stable over the past year (9.1% in the first quarter of 2013), while the global weighted average fell to an all-time low of 6.9% in the first quarter of 2013. This suggests that prices are decreasing where higher volumes are being transferred. Canada, Italy and the UK also registered increases in the average price for the first quarter of 2013, caused mainly by higher exchange-rate margins being charged by remittance service providers. The price of sending remittances from France and Germany declined nearly 1 percentage point in the first quarter of 2013 compared with a year earlier, decreasing from 11.8% to 10.7% in France, and from 11.2% to 10.2% in Germany. Trends in remittance prices worldwide Total cost of sending $200, including fees and exchange-rate margins 10% 8% 6% 4% 2% 0% 2008 1Q2009 3Q2009 1Q2010 3Q2010 1Q2011 3Q2011 1Q2012 3Q2012 1Q2013 2Q2013 3Q2013 Simple average Weighted average Source: Remittance Prices Worldwide, the World Bank, 2014
  10. 10. 10 The migrants market: latest evolutions and outlook Market competition for providing remittance services is a key driver in pushing down prices, and analysis of several corridors finds that prices are lower where there are more providers serving the same corridor. Transparency is also an important factor in remittance markets, and money-transfer operators are continuing to lower their prices, while also being the most transparent – with 98% disclosing full information to their customers. For banks and post offices, the comparative figures are only 76% and 45%, respectively. Markets will be helped by improved disclosure requirements, as contained in the US Remittance Transfer Rule (refer to section 2). Remittance costs are a key determinant of resource flows to developing countries, and lowering these costs is an important policy objective, as affirmed by the G20 in their 2008 commitment to reducing the global average remittance cost by 5 percentage points (from 10% to 5%) over five years (the 5 x 5 objective), which could save up to $16 billion a year. In addition, the speed of delivery may strongly influence the decision of the sender to choose a particular channel (banking channel, money-transfer operators or postal network…). Even if banks could outsource this business to maintain remittance-transfer services to their customers, prices will continue to fall and force banks to focus on their most natural way to send money (from accounts or cards to accounts), and let specialized competitors (Western Union, MoneyGram…) organize cash-transfers. Those operators have wide networks in the sending and receiving countries, less stringent identification requirements, and can easily organize low-value and high-frequency transactions. New regulatory constraints Increased transparency Lower fees New recipe for remittances business Normed processes
  11. 11. 11 New regulatory requirements appear to be going to make remittance transfers to other countries more transparent and reliable The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act directed the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau to adopt the US Remittance Transfer Rule (effective on October 28, 2013) whereby remittances will be more controlled. Dodd-Frank seeks to protect and inform consumers by providing greater transparency and predictability with respect to the price and delivery of international payments. Based on Dodd- Frank, international remittance transfers from individuals in the United States are subject to clear and prominent disclosures about the price of a transfer, the amount of currency to be delivered to the recipient and the date the funds will become available. The Rule has significant implications for the remittance industry in the US, and aims to enhance transparency and competition, as well as establishing norms for addressing grievances and errors. Banks that deal with international consumer payments now need to amend their cross-border payments models, systems and processes to satisfy some provisions (guarantee of amount of final funds delivered, guarantee on when funds will be received, right to cancel a transaction up to 30 minutes after its submission, fees and taxes imposed…). Fees and margins will keep decreasing while new development costs will appear. To summarize, regulatory rules are becoming more restrictive, prices are still decreasing, forcing the banks to adapt their business model for remittances. Nevertheless, the migrants’ market is much more than remittance. Indeed, it is still expanding and provides new opportunities for banks. Transform regulatory constraint into opportunity More restrictive regulatory rules and prices that fall down for remittances push banks to transform their business model. Because Migrants’ market is still growing, they have to maintain their money transfer services and use it as a flagship product integrated to a competitive offer with new adapted products. With a more complete offer, banks will remove money-transfer operators competition, attract and retain customers. Key lessons learned
  12. 12. 12 The migrants market: latest evolutions and outlook In this challenging and competitive market, we studied, through interviews with sales and marketing managers, three major European players that have developed different business models to address the migrant market. • BNP Paribas has set a priority on building synergies across its entities to create direct impact for retail customers and encourage cross-selling. • Deutsche Bank has launched an affinity offering for the Turkish community in Germany, which aims to assist migrants with their projects, solely in Germany. • Extrabanca, the first pure player, proposes a model that aims at serving all foreign communities living in Italy, both families and businesses. BNPP: create cross-entity synergies BNP Paribas is a leading retail bank in Europe and a key player at World level, operating in 78 countries* (see illustration below). With over 23 million* retail customers, the Group is continuously seeking to better address the needs of existing customers and acquire new customers through new segments and innovative approaches. Over the past four years, the Group has set a priority on building synergies across entities to create direct impact for retail customers and encourage cross-selling. At the same time, improving customer retention is an increasingly big challenge for the bank in a competitive environment, especially in its European domestic markets. The migrant segment was a key population to be addressed in such a context, and BNP Paribas has built up an innovative approach with Maghreb communities. BNPP Retail Banking international network coverage: a key asset to be leveraged to address the migrant segment The Group has built a wide retail banking network based on a strong historical footprint in Europe with four domestic markets (France, Italy, Belgium and Luxembourg) and retail entities outside Europe (United States, Asia, Mediterranean-Africa, Turkey and Central/Eastern Europe) with continuous expansion into new territories. BNP Paribas has launched several initiatives aimed at improving the customer banking experience within the Group, reinforcing the image and competitiveness of BNPP as an international player, and designing offer/service levels for specific targets (cross-border, mass affluent customers, migrants). On the migrant segment, BNPP had existing assets: • Significant retail networks in both the home and host countries of major communities (i.e. European domestic markets, Maghreb, United States…) • An existing large customer portfolio in countries of origin and of residence • Specific products and services for migrants • In addition, some communities represented greater potential in terms of deposits and money transfers (i.e. migrants from Morocco). European business models: three different approaches to the market * Source: bnpparibas.com as of 1 November 2012
  13. 13. 13 BNPP approach towards migrants: develop acquisition in migrants’ countries of origin (Morocco, Algeria and Tunisia) and improve existing customer retention in migrants’ countries of residence (mainly France and Belgium) BNP Paribas decided to focus on the France - Maghreb migrant corridor, which represented the highest potential in terms of banking equipment and benefited from its existing assets. The Moroccan migrant community was a strategic target for banks (a strategic source for remittances with ~30% of global remittances each year, and a source for cash deposits, with 30% of global local cash deposits) and, since 2007, BNPP France and BNPP Morocco (BMCI) had started to develop attractive dedicated products/services for this population that could be enhanced (transfers at preferred price, prescription and remote account opening, dedicated offers…). After three years, the partnership between French and Moroccan entities was a success: • +50% account openings in this segment for the BNPP Moroccan entity (BMCI) and quality customers • Satisfaction of Paribas France retail branches that significantly improved their customers’ experience by responding to specific needs linked to their personal situation/history • Very positive customer feedback on the simplicity of the process and the competitiveness of the offer. Based on this first successful initiative, the approach has been replicated in other Maghreb entities: for Moroccan migrants in Belgium in 2012, and Algerian and Tunisian communities in France in 2013. Very positive results have been achieved, even beyond the bank’s initial commercial objectives (100% of objectives for Tunisia and 150% of objectives for Algeria). BNP Paribas worldwide retail network A strong potential identified on Maghreb communities Source: BNP Paribas retail entities as of Nov. 2012 (source: bnpparibas.com), World Bank factbook 2011 as of 2010 data • France-Morocco: 1.100K Moroccan migrants • Belgium-Morocco: 285K Moroccan migrants • France-Algeria: France, first country of destination of Algerian migrants with 1.200K people (76% of worldwide Algerian migrant population) • France-Tunisia: France, first country of destination of Tunisian migrants with 600K people (54% of worldwide Tunisian migrant population)
  14. 14. 14 The migrants market: latest evolutions and outlook A genuine offer to reward customer loyalty to the Group with dedicated benefits adapted to each community’s specific circumstances Migrants of Maghreb communities have common points, but with some specific needs due to their home-country context, personal/family situation, link to their home country, personal projects. Hence, BNP Paribas defined generic guidelines for a standard packaged offer, enabling local adaptation to the context of each corridor. Several points were highlighted by BNPP migrant customers as the ‘must haves’: • A competitive daily banking offer package dedicated to existing BNPP France customers, including cheap and secure transfers • A high level of service including ease of customer path for opening an account from the country of residence • Dedicated products adapted to their context: boosted savings rates, cheaper loans and mortgages, specific insurance for body repatriation • Belonging to the same Group and the strong link between BNP Paribas France and its Maghreb entities, as a major advantage providing customers with a feeling of security, assistance and quality service continuity ‘here and abroad’ • Simplicity of the customer path to opening/managing their account remotely. On that last point, BNP Paribas has built up a specific service to make it easier for a BNPP France customer to open their account in another BNPP Maghreb entity: BNP Paribas handles the ‘paperwork’ and the customer needs only to finalize the account opening by collecting their payment facilities in the country of origin (see illustration below). Client’s home network (country of residence) Client A Client request to open an account in another BNPP entity Request management by the Call Center of the welcome entity and client face to face appointment to finalize account opening Welcome network (country of origin) Network A Network B Branch Web Call Center Branch Web Call Center
  15. 15. 15 A complete distribution and communication organization has been set up by BNP Paribas in those home/host entities to support the new offer launch and build up a perennial local acquisition dynamic: • Dedicated/targeted sales promotion plan in France (effort limited to branches with the largest number of customers to maximize ROI), and attractive financial incentives (for each account opening) to maximize branch managers’ involvement • Dedicated/targeted sales promotion plan in Maghreb entities (national with a dedicated central sales promotion team) • Call centers set up with multilingual services • Communication campaigns at branch level in France (resident network) and national level in Maghreb entities (origin country), based on multimedia support adapted to each context, and with dedicated display and messages. Transform regulatory constraint into opportunity: • A ‘win-win’ operation for both sides: a way to better address French migrant customers’ needs and improve retention, as well as bringing new high-potential customers to Maghreb entities • Such an initiative encourages collaborative work between entities: dialogue during preparation and launch of the commercial operation, regular exchanges on commercial results to set up coherent action plans in France and Maghreb entities… – It favors financial synergies and the building of a Group culture that are positive from both an internal and an external point of view. • A simple customer path drives success: customers are very sensitive to the ease with which they can open an account and perform their daily banking operations, including remotely. The BNP Paribas service was designed especially for migrants, to facilitate all the paper work involved in opening an account in their country of residence, so that customers are only requested to go to a branch in their origin country to retrieve their credit card. – A simple customer path guarantees maximization of the transformation rate. • An offer designed based on migrant customers’ needs and expectations: common needs between different communities, and specific needs for some communities (e.g., a current account in € in Algeria) • A smart allocation of investments to maximize the effects: – Commercial efforts need to be focused on the key period for migrants, immediately prior to their annual return to their country of origin. – A targeted sales promotion plan limits the effort of the national commercial network to those branches with the largest number of targeted customers. – Significant financial resources need to be allocated to achieve objectives (i.e., financial incentives for sales, budget for multimedia plan…) • A close monitoring of commercial results and a close collaboration between entities are key at launch and beyond: it is essential that commercial teams in entities communicate with each other closely to fine-tune the process/offer based on early customer feedback, to identify any issues and to set up an action plan for adjusting the sales promotion plan if necessary. Key lessons learned
  16. 16. 16 The migrants market: latest evolutions and outlook Bankamiz: A new Deutsche Bank division for Turkish people Overview and results since 2006 Turks are the majority foreign community represented in Germany, with more than 2.7 million people. Besides this fact, there are many other reasons to consider the Turkish community as an attractive target for Deutsche Bank. The Turkish community is very mature and well integrated into German society. Today, most Turks are looking for a future in Germany, whereas in the past, first generations used to send large amounts of money to their country of origin in order to be able to return there when they retired. Consequently, remittances from Germany to Turkey have been decreasing significantly since 1995. Moreover, studies have demonstrated that the Turkish community embraces a high potential saving behavior and Turks are considered to be trustworthy and low-risk customers. (‘Diversity in European Marketing: Text and Cases’, Thomas Rudolph, Bodo B. Schlegelmilch, András Bauer, Josep Franch, Jan Niklas Meise, 2012) Bankamiz website’s homepage, where clients can choose to browse in the Turkish language Remittances from Germany Stock of Turkish origin population 0 1968 1978 1988 1998 2008 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 1968 1978 1988 1998 2008 $billions millions Source: German Federal Statistical Office
  17. 17. 17 Bankamiz, which means ‘our bank’ in Turkish, an exclusive offer dedicated to Turkish residents, was launched by Deutsche Bank in 2006. This initiative is based on an affinity approach developed with customization of existing products (e.g. credit cards with visual affinity), appropriate communication (e.g. dedicated website in two different languages) and significant efforts on the distribution network. Until 2011, Bankamiz recorded more than 60,000 customers through 50 corners based in Deutsche Bank branches in all significant Turkish neighbourhoods. Between 2011 and 2013, Bankamiz, lost some 5,000 customers and closed five corners. Nevertheless, Bankamiz is still quite positive: according to Mitat Cinar, Sales Marketing Manager at Deutsche Bank for Bankamiz, “Bankamiz is still very profitable [...] the revenue per customer is higher than the average revenue per customer at Deutsche Bank”. The loss of customers, directly linked to the departure of several Bankamiz Relationship Managers, led to the conclusion that a commercial promotion based on proximity and real person-to-person relationships with customers are the key success factors. Consequently, over the next five years, Deutsche Bank plans to extend its Bankamiz offer to all 7,000 branches throughout the country. Distribution network of Bankamiz: 45 corners through Germany Bankamiz credit cards with visual affinity Source: M. Cinar, Bankamiz, Kurt Salmon interview
  18. 18. 18 The migrants market: latest evolutions and outlook An in-depth understanding of needs and cultural code to propose an adapted offer and communication: • Being aware of the different critial moments of the customer experience and proposing special dedicated ‘emotional products’, such as: Bankamiz Private Credit, which proposes a credit line from €5,000 to €50,000; or Bankamiz Fixed Interest Savings for saving for and organizing a wedding. • Communication based on emotion, with proper Turkish symbols: the brand’s icon is a glass of tea, the symbol for Turkish people of friendship and hospitality. Many marketing campaigns highlight other typical symbols. • Physical presence across all Turkish channels to attract new customers: Bankamiz participates in many Turkish cultural events (soccer competition, Turkish association sponsorships…) and on Turkish media. Key lessons learned “We make your dream come true” and “Welcome to your own home”: two commercial brochures highlighting the eye-shaped protective amulet (“nazar boncuğu”) “Save for the most beautiful goal of your life”: two wedding rings engraved with the words in Turkish “hope” and “desire” continued...
  19. 19. 19 Proximity and trust to attract and retain customers Bankamiz understood that reaching Turkish people implies that the relationship manager has to be close to the community, being integrated into the community and speaking Turkish, for example, as well as being aware of its fundamental values: • Customers’ trust in their relationship manager is more significant. For instance, during the financial crisis, Deutsche Bank noticed that Bankamiz customers were less vindictive than other customers. • Customers feel more comfortable and less anxious; thanks to the confidence they have in their relationship manager. For instance, Bankamiz customers are more active and the banking equipment (including credit loans) is more complete than the other customers.
  20. 20. 20 The migrants market: latest evolutions and outlook Extrabanca: the first pure player in the migrants market Overview and results since 2006 Founded in 2010, Extrabanca is the first bank in Italy aimed specifically at serving mainly foreign citizens living in Italy, represented by families and businesses. Extrabanca is owned by a consortium of several wealthy entrepreneurs, insurer Generali and the Cariplo Foundation. And, following a new road show in 2013, Extrabanca successfully achieved a capital increase. The reason why Extrabanca decided to target migrants is because Italy is one of the most important destination countries for migrants to Europe: around 5 million regular migrants live in the country (some 8% of the total population) and the annual growth rate of migrant presence is the highest in the European Union. (Source: IOM, International Organization for Migration) “Immigrants resident in Italy do not represent a niche any more but a large market, growing fast and with very significant revenues. Small companies run by immigrants are getting fundamental in many business sectors. Traditional retail banks do not know how to properly address their specific needs.” Source: Extrabanca corporate presentation, 2012
  21. 21. 21 Extrabanca’s model relies on friendlier staff, products tailored to immigrants and longer opening hours (including Saturdays). The network currently comprises three branches in Milano and Brescia but it is expected soon to get wider, with new openings in Prato which has a huge Chinese community), Rome (the first largest market in Italy), Bologna and Florence. Source: Extrabanca corporate presentation, 2012 0 1971 12% 10 20 30 40 50 0 2 4 6 8 10 1260 1470 1981 14% 2011 23% 7.5% 2% over 65 years 2030f 13.5% 1992 0.6% 2002 2.3% 2011 7.5% 2006 4.1% Over 65 years Foreign origin Italian population (million) Italian foreign population (million) Transform regulatory constraint into opportunity A unique service model approach to respond to a lack of offer in Italy: Extrabanca understood that the migrant market offers a window of business opportunities for banks. Using a risk-based approach, they no longer consider migrants as a marginal segment but even more reliable than other customers. Key lessons learned
  22. 22. 22 The migrants market: latest evolutions and outlook Migrants are often considered as a marginal segment, highly risky, finding it difficult to understand and which banks are reluctant to serve. In fact, migrants are less risky because of their status: to build trust with bankers, they pay much more attention to their finances, and when there is an incident, it is principally due to a lack of understanding. Simple and efficient, Extrabanca’s service model responds to customers’ essential needs: • Accessibility: extensive opening hours, barrier-free branches… • Simplicity: 40 products to serve families and SMEs, with a transparent pricing structure • Counselling: a sales team composed of multilingual financial advisors has to ensure that customers have a good understanding of the bank’s products. They should be like coaches for customers, helping them to find the right tools to manage their finances. Consequently, interviews typically last far longer than in traditional banks (more than 1 hour). Source: Extrabanca corporate presentation, 2012 Deposits Loans Services Money transfer Immigrants 15% 15% 65% 5% 120 Italian mass market 45% 21% 34% 100 Higher revenues than the average Italian Mass Market “Extrabanca mainly targets the segment of immigrants with a premium offer: our intention was to create a branch with a comfortable and aesthetically appealing environment, able to give back dignity to people who might have obtained a university degree in their countries of origin and who are now in a context that does not always recognize them as qualified people.” Alberto Rabbia – Extrabanca Chief Operating Officer
  23. 23. 23 An original distribution model to attract customers and promote the brand image Extrabanca’s brand image is based on emotion, sensitivity and human values. In order to enhance customer intimacy and proximity, Extrabanca has put in place an innovative approach: • Branches are built in a ‘boutique’ style, well-structured and divided into different areas: an entrance to be attracted to go inside, a central welcoming area with accessible information, open stations with benches and large portals emphasizing the space. Decoration in warm and embracing colors makes the branches pleasant and cosy places where customers feel at home. Moreover, branches are not only a point of sale but also a place for culture and art exhibitions. • Extrabanca is also highly present in the different communities with its participation in and sponsorship of various associations and cultural manifestations. For example, Extrabanca was the main sponsor of Miss Sri Lanka Italy and visibly present at the Philippine Festival in 2013. • Furthermore, Extrabanca effectively uses traditional approaches from mass-retail industries: street marketing (e.g. €20 vouchers for a first money transfer operation), or Members get Members campaigns (e.g. €25 gift for both sponsor and new customer) to attract new customers and numerous SMS campaigns (to promote special offers) to entertain customers.
  24. 24. 24 The migrants market: latest evolutions and outlook These case studies clearly show how approaches rely on purpose: • Considering migrants as international customers (the BNPP model) • Considering migrants as an affinity segment of mass retail customers (Deutsche Bank and Extrabanca) Therefore, values and levers are clearly different! – Basic offer of banking services easy to understand with a transparent pricing structure – Must have: Money transfer services at competitive prices Supporting clients’ domestic needs in their host country Affinity marketing approach Resident needs Proximity and hospitality A ‘feel of home’ feeling Cultural codes Emotion Accessibility Multi-cultural environment Expatriate needs Reliability Quality of the services Speed of the services Transparency International clients marketing approach Supporting clients’ needs in their origin country Define your micro-segmentation is instrumental to push the right offer: • Migrants segment is a combination of various clients profiles. • Some are used to banking products. Others are not. • Some send money every month to their origin country but never fly back; Others go there every summer and do not send money. • Some need mortgage in their origin country, others need a card… • Banks will have to determine these profiles and consider which niche they have to invest on. After that, addressing their target will go through a wide range of possibilities: • From ‘High level Offer’: quality of the relationship management, dedicated multilingual advisors, specific distribution model with targeted corners…) for high ROI-potential target. • To ‘Light banking’ concept that only covers the basic needs without any affinity products to focus on volumes and boost acquisition. Key lessons learned
  25. 25. 25 The migrant segment, a successful experience of new trends in retail banking From ‘mass-marketing’ to ‘niche-marketing’ After the two historical axes (age/potential), the use of ‘belonging to a community’ as a third axis for segmentation has proved to be an effective means to acquire, equip and retain. Beyond the experiments presented in this study, several players have successfully positioned in even more ‘micro’ segments. Of note is Caisse d’Epargne in France, which several years ago opened a dedicated branch for Japanese residents in Paris, a market of fewer than 15,000 people. These initiatives are all the more secrete as they are very profitable… Which leads us to believe that ‘the smaller the target, the higher the profit per customer’! If we take a look at other industries, this seems to be a clear trend of marketing and distribution. For many years, major retailers (e.g. Walmart, Carrefour, Auchan…) have been using different segmentation criteria to organize merchandizing: even small supermarkets already have shelves dedicated to: • one country of origin (e.g., Mexico or Vietnam in the US), • one region of origin (e.g., Corsica or Pais Basco in France), • one religion (e.g., Kosher or Hallal shelves), • fair trade products and organic products… But the most symptomatic illustration of this trend is clearly the evolution of direct marketing. Direct marketing cells, which used to work on three or four annual campaigns dedicated to the whole customer base, now work on more than 50 activities a year, using a ‘test-and-learn’ approach in micro-segments. And, quite naturally, rates of return are much higher this way. But if micro-segmentation and niche marketing seem to be the future of financial marketing, one may wonder about the future of: • Banking offers: what about a new axis to package products? • Distribution networks: how many different branch formats are the most efficient? • Advisors’ profiles: which criteria should be used to organize portfolios?
  26. 26. 26 The migrants market: latest evolutions and outlook From selling to counselling…and financial education The migrant experience is also interesting insofar as it seems to remind us of the fundamentals of the banking relationship and customer needs. First, migrants express the need to understand what they consume, even when it concerns banking products. European players that have succeeded in this market, or more broadly on the ‘mass- market’, have understood this point. The Extrabanca case study teaches us that a simple lever is to increase the duration of interviews between customer and Relationship Manager. Thus, A. Rabbia, Extrabanca COO, tells us that the average length of an interview at Extrabanca is about 1 hour 30 minutes, as against 45 to 50 minutes in a traditional bank. Indeed, it seems to be very important to allow time for the customer to ask questions and for the Relationship Manager to ensure that everything is clear at the end of the interview, for two reasons: • To build a counselor/counselee relationship and to establish trust • To prevent risks. According to A. Rabbia, most financial problems with migrants are due to a misunderstanding. The misunderstanding of the basics of financial literacy and banking products seems to be general all over Europe. A recent study conducted by ING-DiBa showed that less than half of the west European population had received a financial education. Thus, many retail banks have understood this issue and a lot of financial education programs have been implemented in both Eastern and Western Europe for children…as well as for parents. A few examples are: • In Ukraine, Platinum Bank has educated 25,000 children • In Italy, Unicredit offers customers and non-customers free participation on courses • In Germany, Easycredit has implemented free independent debt counseling (online and over the phone) This awareness has also brought product innovation. Indeed, the Austrian bank Erste Bank has set up a system with two accounts for its low-income customers in Romania--one hosting direct debits and credit transfers and one dedicated to ‘pocket money’. These different examples show how an understanding of banking products is not a constraint to be dealt with but an integral part of the banking relationship.
  27. 27. 27 New values to guide offers, customer relationships and distribution The values that migrants look for in their relationship with banks seem to be shared with most mass-retail customers: trust, proximity, transparency…But are banks really operating in line with these values? During the past five years, banks have made great efforts to simplify their offers and bring more transparency in pricing, particularly in response to regulation. But for many years, banks have highlighted security and confidentiality in an attempt to encourage people to keep their money in banks rather than to build an uninvested nest-egg. Thus, many branches are still similar to safety deposit-boxes, made of marble and metal. But mass-retail customers, especially low-income customers, feel as though those branches are not for them: especially following recent bank failures, they feel that banks charge a lot, that the little money they have does not justify those security resources, and don’t feel really welcome in branches. So the success of Extrabanca is not surprising: welcoming, ‘boutique-style’ branches, accessible Relationship Managers who do not look different from customers. Thus, while trends clearly show that mass-retail customers are more willing to go to branches than premium customers, who are more eager to have remote banking, one may wonder if the banking distribution network is still well adapted to its market…
  28. 28. 28 The migrants market: latest evolutions and outlook Since former migrants study, institutional figures have confirmed the weight of the migrants market growing at an outstanding path, overcoming global moribund economic situation, exchange rates and oil prices. One of the main changes we observe is the legal context, bound to stimulate remittances flows in the coming years: increasing transparency, shortening delays, enhanced competition and thus reducing fees, are forcing banks to update their business model as regard to migrants segment, going beyond cash transfer tight competition to focus on their major assets: banking and advising. The three business models we studied could illustrate that several competitive advantages can lead to success: • Leverage on your international network so that each entity can mutually enhance acquisition/ equipment/retention. • Develop an in-depth understanding of your segment and extend proximity to build trust all along the client lifecycle. • Address a too neglected multi-origin segment with a simple offer to answer the customer’s essential needs. Key success factors to approach migrants market rely on mastering micro segmentation, light banking but adding value, and having a good command of distribution models: tactical mapping, branches vs. boutiques, accessibility, portfolio management reflecting the bank strategic objectives. Conclusion
  29. 29. 29 Acknowledgements For their contribution to the case study, the authors would like to thank the following experts: • Sébastien Roger, BNP Paribas • Olga Girardot, BNP Paribas • Mitat Cinar, Bankamiz - Deutsche Bank • Alberto Rabbia, Extrabanca For their strong commitment to deliver this study, we are grateful to Alexis Beau, Hélène Cambournac, Julie Bousquet, Leila Bridja and Daniel Verschaere.
  30. 30. 30 The migrants market: latest evolutions and outlook
  31. 31. 31 About us As a global not-for-profit organisation, Efma brings together more than 3,300 retail financial services companies from over 130 countries. With a membership base consisting of almost a third of all large retail banks worldwide, Efma has proven to be a valuable resource for the global industry, offering members exclusive access to a multitude of resources, databases, studies, articles, news feeds and publications. Efma also provides numerous networking opportunities through working groups, online communities and international meetings. For more information: www.efma.com or info@efma.com Kurt Salmon is a management consultancy focused on business transformation with 21 offices in North America, Europe, Asia and Africa. Our 1,400 consultants advise companies’ top management on projects that have a tangible impact on the success of their businesses and, in particular, their transformation projects. The firm’s success lies in our ability to build long-lasting client relationships based on trust and to achieve the outstanding results that make us standard-setters for the consulting sector. Contacts Hélène Cambournac, Manager helene.cambournac@kurtsalmon.com Aude Arkam, Manager aude.arkam@kurtsalmon.com Joël Nadjar, Global Partner joel.nadjar@kurtsalmon.com For more information: www.kurtsalmon.com @KurtSalmonFR 24, rue Salomon de Rothschild - 92288 Suresnes - FRANCE Tél. : +33 (0)1 57 32 87 00 / Fax : +33 (0)1 57 32 87 87 Web : www.carrenoir.com INEUM Kurt Salmon INE_06_0409_Logo_CMYK 14/12/2010 QUADRICHROMIE M100 Y100 K100 M65 Y100 Ce fichier est un document d’exécution créé sur Illustrator version CS3.
  32. 32. 32 The migrants market: latest evolutions and outlook The migrants market Latest evolutions and outlook March 2014

×