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My Family - Dylan C

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My Family - Dylan C

  1. 1.  My great granddad was in WWII. He was a plane mechanic, he fixed trucks too. He was born in 1920. During WWII mechanics fixed a lot of machines like jeeps , trucks , tanks and airplanes. They fix a wide variety of mechanical/electrical things . They repaired 2 1/2 ton trucks, P51 Mustang fighter aircraft as well as numerous other machines .
  2. 2. Clark is an English surnameThe Clark surname is another name for cleric, clerk, or scholar - one who can read and write, from the Old English clerk(e)c, meaning "priest.". Chlerich/Cleireach"; son of the cleric or, sometimes, clerk. During the Middle Ages, the common pronunciation of –clerk is Clark.
  3. 3.  The surname of BEAZLEY was a locational name of Beesley a spot in County Lancashire. Local names usually denoted where a man held his land, and indicated where he actually lived. The name was originally derived from the Old English word BEOSLEAH, literally meaning the dweller in the wood-clearing. Local surnames, by far the largest group, derived from a place name where the man held land or from the place from which he had come, or where he actually lived. These local surnames were originally preceded by a preposition such as "de", "atte", "by" or "in". The names may derive from a manor held, from working in a religious dwelling or from literally living by a wood or marsh or by a stream. The name is now common in the West Midlands and elsewhere, as well as in Lancashire. The name has been in Ireland since the 17th century, where it is rendered in the Gaelic form BEASLAOI. Early records of the name mention Thomas de Besleg, 1246 County Lancashire. Richard Beazley of Yorkshire, was listed in the Yorkshire Poll Tax of 1379. Originally the coat of arms identified the wearer, either in battle or in tournaments. Completely covered in body and facial armor the knight could be spotted and known by the insignia painted on his shield, and embroidered on his surcoat, the draped garment which enveloped him. Between the 11th and 15th centuries it became customary for surnames to be assumed in Europe, but were not commonplace in England or Scotland before the Norman Conquest of 1066. They are to be found in the Doomsday Book of 1086. Those of gentler blood assumed surnames at this time, but it was not until the reign of Edward II (1307- 1327) that second names became general practice for all people. When the coast of England was invaded by William The Conqueror in the year 1066, the Normans brought with them a store of French personal names, which soon, more or less, entirely replaced the traditional more varied Old English personal names, at least among the upper and middle classes. A century of so later, given names of the principal saints of the Christian church began to be used. It is from these two types of given name that the majority of the English patronymic surnames are derived and used to this day.

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