NMP 656
Relationships, Communication and
Philanthropy

NMP 650
E-Portfolio Assignment # 2
Athena Gould
Learning Objectives
1

• Building Relationships

2

• Development Cycle

3

• Getting your Message
out
Building
Relationships
Why is Relationship Building
Important?
“Relationships are bigger than ‘getting
something from someone’ or collaborating w...
5 Sins of Donor Engagement
1. Separating Fund Development from
Philanthropy.
2. Treating Giving as a Financial Transaction...
#1: Separating Fund Development
from Philanthropy
“Philanthropy means voluntary action for the common
good. Fund developme...
#2: Treating Giving as a Financial Transaction
Rather than an Emotional Act
“… nonprofits/NGOs are the means by which
the ...
#3: Trespassing on Personal and
Professional Relationships
“Trespassing on personal and professional relationships produce...
#4: Universalizing Your Own Passion
“Do not try to ‘educate’ people or businesses
about how important your cause and
organ...
#5: Asking Prematurely
“First, you figure out if they are predisposed. Then you
cultivate a bit and determine if they qual...
Development
Cycle
It is important to be honest with donors.
Transparency is vital to building quality
relationships with potential and curre...
Donor Bills of Rights
• To be informed of the organization's mission, of the way the
organization intends to use donated r...
Donor Bills of Rights (Cont.)
• To be assured that information about their donations is
handled with respect and with conf...
“…as with anything in your organization, your
relationship-building program and plan reflect your
values. The soul of your...
The Donor Centric Pledge
•
•

•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•

That donors are essential to the success of our mission.
That gifts are...
The Donor Centric Pledge (Cont.)
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•

That donors want to have faith in us, and that it's our fault if t...
Getting your
Message out
Getting your Message out
“The development of a strategic message -- that
set of statements that lays the foundation for
co...
Mechanisms for communicating your
message
•
•
•
•
•
•

Direct Mail
Newsletter
Email
Website
Telephone
Personal communicati...
Getting your Message out
“To produce good to great results in fund
development, organizations need a
communications plan t...
Remember!!
“When you see yourself as a fundraiser, you tend
to focus on meeting cash goals. When you see
yourself as a com...
References
Ahern, T., & Joyaux, S. (2008). Keep your donors the guide to
better communications and stronger relationships....
Nmp 650   e-portfolio assignment 2 - a gould
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Nmp 650 e-portfolio assignment 2 - a gould

240 views

Published on

Published in: Health & Medicine
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
240
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
6
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • This is another option for an Overview slide.
  • What will the audience be able to do after this training is complete? Briefly describe each objective how the audiencewill benefit from this presentation.
  • This is another option for an Overview slides using transitions.
  • Give a brief overview of the presentation. Describe the major focus of the presentation and why it is important.Introduce each of the major topics.To provide a road map for the audience, you can repeat this Overview slide throughout the presentation, highlighting the particular topic you will discuss next.
  • Give a brief overview of the presentation. Describe the major focus of the presentation and why it is important.Introduce each of the major topics.To provide a road map for the audience, you can repeat this Overview slide throughout the presentation, highlighting the particular topic you will discuss next.
  • Give a brief overview of the presentation. Describe the major focus of the presentation and why it is important.Introduce each of the major topics.To provide a road map for the audience, you can repeat this Overview slide throughout the presentation, highlighting the particular topic you will discuss next.
  • Give a brief overview of the presentation. Describe the major focus of the presentation and why it is important.Introduce each of the major topics.To provide a road map for the audience, you can repeat this Overview slide throughout the presentation, highlighting the particular topic you will discuss next.
  • Give a brief overview of the presentation. Describe the major focus of the presentation and why it is important.Introduce each of the major topics.To provide a road map for the audience, you can repeat this Overview slide throughout the presentation, highlighting the particular topic you will discuss next.
  • Give a brief overview of the presentation. Describe the major focus of the presentation and why it is important.Introduce each of the major topics.To provide a road map for the audience, you can repeat this Overview slide throughout the presentation, highlighting the particular topic you will discuss next.
  • Give a brief overview of the presentation. Describe the major focus of the presentation and why it is important.Introduce each of the major topics.To provide a road map for the audience, you can repeat this Overview slide throughout the presentation, highlighting the particular topic you will discuss next.
  • Give a brief overview of the presentation. Describe the major focus of the presentation and why it is important.Introduce each of the major topics.To provide a road map for the audience, you can repeat this Overview slide throughout the presentation, highlighting the particular topic you will discuss next.
  • Give a brief overview of the presentation. Describe the major focus of the presentation and why it is important.Introduce each of the major topics.To provide a road map for the audience, you can repeat this Overview slide throughout the presentation, highlighting the particular topic you will discuss next.
  • Give a brief overview of the presentation. Describe the major focus of the presentation and why it is important.Introduce each of the major topics.To provide a road map for the audience, you can repeat this Overview slide throughout the presentation, highlighting the particular topic you will discuss next.
  • Give a brief overview of the presentation. Describe the major focus of the presentation and why it is important.Introduce each of the major topics.To provide a road map for the audience, you can repeat this Overview slide throughout the presentation, highlighting the particular topic you will discuss next.
  • Give a brief overview of the presentation. Describe the major focus of the presentation and why it is important.Introduce each of the major topics.To provide a road map for the audience, you can repeat this Overview slide throughout the presentation, highlighting the particular topic you will discuss next.
  • Give a brief overview of the presentation. Describe the major focus of the presentation and why it is important.Introduce each of the major topics.To provide a road map for the audience, you can repeat this Overview slide throughout the presentation, highlighting the particular topic you will discuss next.
  • Give a brief overview of the presentation. Describe the major focus of the presentation and why it is important.Introduce each of the major topics.To provide a road map for the audience, you can repeat this Overview slide throughout the presentation, highlighting the particular topic you will discuss next.
  • Give a brief overview of the presentation. Describe the major focus of the presentation and why it is important.Introduce each of the major topics.To provide a road map for the audience, you can repeat this Overview slide throughout the presentation, highlighting the particular topic you will discuss next.
  • Give a brief overview of the presentation. Describe the major focus of the presentation and why it is important.Introduce each of the major topics.To provide a road map for the audience, you can repeat this Overview slide throughout the presentation, highlighting the particular topic you will discuss next.
  • Give a brief overview of the presentation. Describe the major focus of the presentation and why it is important.Introduce each of the major topics.To provide a road map for the audience, you can repeat this Overview slide throughout the presentation, highlighting the particular topic you will discuss next.
  • Give a brief overview of the presentation. Describe the major focus of the presentation and why it is important.Introduce each of the major topics.To provide a road map for the audience, you can repeat this Overview slide throughout the presentation, highlighting the particular topic you will discuss next.
  • Give a brief overview of the presentation. Describe the major focus of the presentation and why it is important.Introduce each of the major topics.To provide a road map for the audience, you can repeat this Overview slide throughout the presentation, highlighting the particular topic you will discuss next.
  • Nmp 650 e-portfolio assignment 2 - a gould

    1. 1. NMP 656 Relationships, Communication and Philanthropy NMP 650 E-Portfolio Assignment # 2 Athena Gould
    2. 2. Learning Objectives 1 • Building Relationships 2 • Development Cycle 3 • Getting your Message out
    3. 3. Building Relationships
    4. 4. Why is Relationship Building Important? “Relationships are bigger than ‘getting something from someone’ or collaborating with some organization because a funder expects it. Relationships are the core to everything. My life. Your life. Our work. Why are we building relationships? What is our purpose? It’s about a key pillar of philanthropy. It’s about building bridges before we need them.’’ (Ahern & Joyaux, 2008, p.41)
    5. 5. 5 Sins of Donor Engagement 1. Separating Fund Development from Philanthropy. 2. Treating Giving as a Financial Transaction Rather than an Emotional Act. 3. Trespassing on Personal and Professional Relationships. 4. Universalizing Your Own Passion. 5. Asking Prematurely. (Ahern & Joyaux, 2008, p.61)
    6. 6. #1: Separating Fund Development from Philanthropy “Philanthropy means voluntary action for the common good. Fund development is the essential partner of philanthropy. Fund development makes philanthropy possible by bringing together a particular cause and the donors and prospects who care about that cause. Through relationship building, fund development nurtures loyalty and lifetime value, thus facilitating philanthropy.” (Ahern & Joyaux, 2008, p.62)
    7. 7. #2: Treating Giving as a Financial Transaction Rather than an Emotional Act “… nonprofits/NGOs are the means by which the donor fulfills his or her own interests and aspirations. Emotions drive everything, including relationships… Of course, rationale is important in making the case. But rationale is the handmaiden of emotion. Without an emotional basis, your fund development cannot reach its full potential.” (Ahern & Joyaux, 2008, p.64)
    8. 8. #3: Trespassing on Personal and Professional Relationships “Trespassing on personal and professional relationships produces lessthan-satisfactory results like these: • The solicitor often feels like he or she is coercing gifts based on favors. The solicitor feels awkward and uncomfortable and thinks that all fundraising is based on this dynamic. • The prospect thinks that all fundraising is based on this trespassing and favor exchange, thus perpetuating bad fundraising practice. • Your organization acquires donations, probably not donors. The gifts are most likely smaller than could be possible with a donor who really cares. Also, the donations are often short term. • You are not developing a base of loyal donors. • You are not developing a strong and effective fundraising relationship with your solicitors.” (Ahern & Joyaux, 2008, p.65)
    9. 9. #4: Universalizing Your Own Passion “Do not try to ‘educate’ people or businesses about how important your cause and organization are. This is patronizing and offensive. Moreover, it’s a waste of your resources.” “…find those who are interested in the cause and organization. Do not try to convince people to be interested. This gambit wastes organizational time and resources—and makes you and your volunteers feel unsuccessful.” Love my Nonprofit! (Ahern & Joyaux, 2008, p.66)
    10. 10. #5: Asking Prematurely “First, you figure out if they are predisposed. Then you cultivate a bit and determine if they qualify as a prospect. Then you cultivate again. And finally you ask.” Predisposed Individuals (Ahern & Joyaux, 2008, p.92)
    11. 11. Development Cycle
    12. 12. It is important to be honest with donors. Transparency is vital to building quality relationships with potential and current donors.
    13. 13. Donor Bills of Rights • To be informed of the organization's mission, of the way the organization intends to use donated resources, and of its capacity to use donations effectively for their intended purposes. • To be informed of the identity of those serving on the organization's governing board, and to expect the board to exercise prudent judgment in its stewardship responsibilities. • To have access to the organization's most recent financial statements. • To be assured their gifts will be used for the purposes for which they were given. • To receive appropriate acknowledgment and recognition. (Association of Fundraising Professionals)
    14. 14. Donor Bills of Rights (Cont.) • To be assured that information about their donations is handled with respect and with confidentiality to the extent provided by law. • To expect that all relationships with individuals representing organizations of interest to the donor will be professional in nature. • To be informed whether those seeking donations are volunteers, employees of the organization or hired solicitors. • To have the opportunity for their names to be deleted from mailing lists that an organization may intend to share. • To feel free to ask questions when making a donation and to receive prompt, truthful and forthright answers. (Association of Fundraising Professionals)
    15. 15. “…as with anything in your organization, your relationship-building program and plan reflect your values. The soul of your organization comes through in the way you talk about relationships and the way you nurture those relationships.” (Ahern & Joyaux, 2008, p. 173)
    16. 16. The Donor Centric Pledge • • • • • • • • • • • • That donors are essential to the success of our mission. That gifts are not "cash transactions." Donors are not merely a bunch of interchangeable, easily replaceable credit cards, checkbooks and wallets. That no one "owes" us a gift just because our mission is worthy. That any person who chooses to become our donor has enormous potential to assist the mission. That having a program for developing a relationship with that donor is how organizations tap that enormous potential. That we waste that potential when donors are not promptly thanked. That "lifetime value of a donor" is the best (though often overlooked) way to evaluate "return on investment" in fundraising. That donors are more important than donations. Those who currently make small gifts are just as interesting to us as those who currently make large gifts. That acquiring first-time donors is easy but keeping those donors is hard. That many first-time gifts are no more than "impulse purchases" or "first dates.” That we’ll have to work harder for the second gift than we did for the first. That a prerequisite for above-average donor retention is a well-planned donor-centric communications program that begins with a welcome. (Association of Fundraising Professionals)
    17. 17. The Donor Centric Pledge (Cont.) • • • • • • • • • • • That donors want to have faith in us, and that it's our fault if they don't. That donors want to make a difference in the world -- and that our mission is one of many means to that end. That donors are investors. They invest in doing good. They expect their investment to prosper, or they'll invest somewhere else. That we earn the donor's trust by reporting on our accomplishments and efficiency. That individual donors respond to our appeals for personal reasons we can only guess at. That asking a donor why she or he gave a first gift to us will likely lead to an amazingly revealing conversation. That fundraising serves the donors' emotional needs as much as it serves the organization's financial needs. That we are in the "feel good" business. Donors feel good when they help make the world a better place. That a prime goal of fundraising communications is to satisfy basic human needs such as the donor's need to feel important and worthwhile. That the donor's perspective defines what is a "major" gift. That every first gift can open a door to an entirely new world for the donor, through participation in our cause. (Association of Fundraising Professionals)
    18. 18. Getting your Message out
    19. 19. Getting your Message out “The development of a strategic message -- that set of statements that lays the foundation for conveying in-depth information -- is no longer a task to delegate to a charity's public-relations expert. It is now a fundamental responsibility of presidents and executive directors.” (Leet, 2008)
    20. 20. Mechanisms for communicating your message • • • • • • Direct Mail Newsletter Email Website Telephone Personal communication with donors
    21. 21. Getting your Message out “To produce good to great results in fund development, organizations need a communications plan that puts them in frequent touch with prospects and donors. Six times a year, by various means, is probably a minimum. And four of these communications are probably just making contact; they are not hard solicitations.” (Ahern & Joyaux, 2008, p.335)
    22. 22. Remember!! “When you see yourself as a fundraiser, you tend to focus on meeting cash goals. When you see yourself as a communicator, you tend to focus on the donor.” It is important to listen to your donors! (Ahern & Joyaux, 2008, p.178)
    23. 23. References Ahern, T., & Joyaux, S. (2008). Keep your donors the guide to better communications and stronger relationships. Wiley Publishing, Inc. Leet, R. K. (2008). Strong messages mean strong leaders. Chronicle of Philanthropy, 20(13), doi: 1040676X Association of Fundraising Professionals. (n.d.). Donor bil of rights. Retrieved from http://www.afpnet.org/ethics/enforcementDetail.cfm?I temNumber=3359

    ×