Rural Recycling Success Presentation

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For use in schools and classrooms. For more school waste reduction, recycling, and composting resources visit http://nerc.org/documents/index.html#SchoolWaste

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Rural Recycling Success Presentation

  1. 1. Tips for Rural School Waste Reduction & Recycling SuccessAthena Lee Bradley athena@nerc.org 802-254-3636Northeast Recycling Council, Inc.www.nerc.org
  2. 2. AcknowledgementsThe Northeast Recycling Council, Inc.(NERC) was awarded a United StatesDepartment of Agriculture Rural UtilityServices Solid Waste Management Grant in2009 to provide direct technical assistance &training in waste reduction, recycling, andcomposting to rural schools inConnecticut, New York, and Delaware. Eightschools participated in the project over thecourse of two years. Northeast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  3. 3. DisclaimerThis material is based upon work supportedunder a grant by the UtilitiesPrograms, United States Department ofAgriculture. Any opinions, findings, andconclusions or recommendations expressedin this material are solely the responsibilityof the authors and do not necessarilyrepresent the official view of the UtilitiesPrograms. Northeast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  4. 4. NERC Resources for SchoolsThis presentation is designed as a supplement to a companion document—NERC’s Rural School Recycling Success (http://www.nerc.org/documents/rural_school_recycling.pdf). Many school waste reduction, recycling, & composting documents were developed by NERC as part of this project. Presentations & Tip Sheets are available for download at http://www.nerc.org/documents/index.html#SchoolWaste.These documents include detailed information & resources to support school source reduction, reuse, recycling, and composting efforts. Northeast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  5. 5. Recycling – General InformationNortheast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  6. 6. Why Recycle? Between 60-85% of school waste can be recycled or composted Recycling can lead to avoided waste disposal costs Recycling offers opportunities for interdisciplinary studies, service learning projects Reduced purchasing costs through reduction & reuse Northeast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  7. 7. Why Recycle, contd Recycling creates local & regional jobs Recycling conserves resources  Made into new products – from soda bottles to fleece jackets Recycling uses less energy than virgin materials  Burning less fossil fuels = less greenhouse gases  Fewer greenhouse gases = avoiding contributions to climate change Northeast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  8. 8. New Products Made fromRecycled Materials Plastic Glass Metals PaperNortheast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  9. 9. Unique Obstacles to RuralRecycling Collection service options may be limited May be challenging to implement cost effective recycling collection due to lower volumes of recyclables Northeast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  10. 10. Getting Started – Waste Reduction & RecyclingNortheast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  11. 11. Step One: Form a Team Conduct a survey of faculty & staff  Ask for interest, ideas, suggestions, & committee volunteers  Find out who supports waste reduction & recycling  Find out who is willing to make the time & commitment Get permission from school principal/District Superintendent Northeast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  12. 12. Form a Team, contd Include representatives from:  Administration  Faculty  Custodial staff  Cafeteria staff  Parents  Students Appoint coordinator or committee chair Northeast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  13. 13. Tips If implementing a team for a school district or multiple schools, include representatives from each school Look for ways to involve students in the recycling program  Appropriate participation based upon grade level  Fosters greater participation & success Northeast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  14. 14. Step Two: Conduct a Waste Assessment Identify materials to be targeted for reduction, reuse, recycling, composting  Types & amounts of waste  Where the waste is generated Identify locations for recycling containers Review current recycling & waste reduction efforts Northeast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  15. 15. School Waste Assessment FormName of School: Key Contact: Date:Direct Phone number/extension: Email:Number of students in the school: Grade levels:Number of teachers:Number of teacher/staff work areas & break rooms:Number of administrators & other staff:Cafeteria: Has a kitchen? Yes NoConcession St&? Yes NoVending Machines - How many & where are they located? Location 1: Number: Aluminum cans Plastic bottles Milk cartons Other Location 2: Number: Aluminum cans Plastic bottles Milk cartons Other Location 3: Number: Aluminum cans Plastic bottles Milk cartons OtherAre special or hazardous wastes produced by the school? (Such as in the Art rooms, Ceramics Lab, Jewelry Making Shop, Wood Shop, Automotive Shop, Photography Lab, Vocational Labs,etc.) Yes No If yes, see page 8.Custodial service Key Contact: Direct Phone:Email: In-house Contracted Download the form from NERC’s Website -Frequency of in-school waste collection: Daily Every other day Weekly Other:Waste Hauler:Email: www.nerc.org/documents/school_waste_assessment_form.doc Key Contact: Phone: In-house Municipal service Contracted/Private hauler Northeast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  16. 16. What to RecycleNortheast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  17. 17. Paper All clean school paper is recyclable  Copier paper  Writing paper  Colored paper  Junk mail  Newspapers & magazines Do not recycle  Paper with glue, paint, stickers, glitter on it  Tissues  Paper towels Northeast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  18. 18. Cardboard Develop a collection & storage system  Where is it generated?  Who will be responsible for breaking it down?  Where can it be stored?  Cardboard can be stacked & stored in an outside shed or on pallets under plastic  Must be kept clean & dry Flatten to conserve space Remove excess tape Northeast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  19. 19. Cardboard, contd If a recycling hauler collects school paper, likely will also take cardboard  Sometimes cardboard & school paper can be stored together  Often an outside cardboard dumpster will be provided by hauler Cardboard is usually accepted at recycling centers or transfer stations Northeast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  20. 20. Plastic Bottles Typically only plastics #1 (soda/water bottles) & #2 (milk containers) are recyclable  Check with hauler & local recycling center to see if other plastics or aseptic containers are accepted Empty bottles of all liquid Bottles do not need to be rinsed Labels are okay Caps are okay Most likely plastic bottles will need to be taken to a recycling center Consider separating redeemable containers from non-redeemable for fundraising Northeast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  21. 21. Steel & Beverage Cans Rinse to remove food  Labels are okay  Consider rinsing at end of cafeteria kitchen cleanup in available sink water to conserve water, or wash in less-than-full dishwasher Flatten cans  Nest cans to save space Cans may need to be taken by school or volunteer to local recycling center  Check with hauler first to see if will accept for recycling Northeast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  22. 22. Glass Containers Rinse to remove food Remove plastic & metal caps Labels are okay Only beverage & food containers are recyclable  No ceramic or Pyrex glass, drinking glasses, plates, windows, or other types of glass are acceptable Glass will likely need to be taken by school or volunteer to a local recycling center Northeast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  23. 23. Step Three: Goals, Work Plan, Action Steps Set a waste reduction goal that is achievable in the school year Develop a work plan that includes ―action steps‖ to meet the goal  Tasks that need to be done  Who will perform the tasks  Timeline to accomplish the tasks Obtain support for the plan from school administration Northeast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  24. 24. Goals, Work Plan, ActionSteps, contd Start small—one or two materials  Mixed paper & cardboard  Redeemable beverage containers Implement in phases for easy modification Hold a ―desk & locker‖ clean-out day Northeast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  25. 25. Goals, Work Plan, Action Steps, contd Consider simple, low cost waste reduction & reuse programs Expand an existing recycling program by adding at least one material  Conduct an outreach campaign to promote newly added material Northeast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  26. 26. Work Plan SampleGoal: Expand recycling at school by adding beveragecontainer recycling.Strategy: Conduct school-wide education & promotionalcampaign about beverage container recycling project.Tasks:• Committee members will investigate options for obtaining collection containers for the cafeteria & hallways & decide on a collection system.• Develop outreach & promotional materials for the recycling project.• Record tonnages recycled; evaluation & recommendations for program continuation. Northeast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  27. 27. Work Plan Sample, contdTimeline: November - FebruaryMeasures of Success:• Placement of beverage container recycling bins & development of collection plan.• Amount of materials collected, measured by actual weights of materials or recorded volumes of materials.• Documented reporting of any problems & recommendations for continuing the collection next school year. Northeast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  28. 28. Examples of Work Plans can be found in Case Studies on the NERC Website.http://www.nerc.org/documents/ index.html#SchoolWasteNortheast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  29. 29. Develop a Budget Recycling bins  Cardboard boxes  Solicit bin contributions from town or businesses Staff & teacher time Promotion (signage, fliers) Hauling charges Northeast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  30. 30. Cost Efficiencies Develop partnerships with businesses, PTO, & the community Collect redeemable beverage containers Consider recycling fundraisers, such as cell phones & printer cartridges  Hold community collections – beverage containers, cell phones, etc. Northeast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  31. 31. Cost Efficiencies, contd Review existing hauler contracts Maintain accurate recycling records Ensure waste disposal contract is based on actual volumes disposed  Monitor waste disposal once recycling is implemented Northeast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  32. 32. TipDiscuss with school administrationhow waste reduction & recyclingcan reduce disposal costs for theschool. Northeast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  33. 33. Step Four: Consider WasteReduction & ReusePaper Use Reduction Campaign Adopt a school ―Paper Use Reduction‖ goal & policy that promotes use of electronic media  Send notices home to parents via email  Use email for in-school communications  Set up a file-share system on the school Website Northeast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  34. 34. Paper Use Reduction Campaign, contd Double-sided copying  Train staff about double-sided copying/printing  Post signage about recycling & double-sided printing next to all printers/copiers  Set double-sided copying/printing as default setting Reuse boxes  In all classrooms, next to printers & copiers Northeast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  35. 35. Reduction & Reuse, contdCafeteria Food Waste Reduction Zero waste lunches ―Offer Versus Serve‖  Allow students to decline items they do not want o Acceptable under USDA national school lunch & breakfast programs Northeast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  36. 36. Reduction & Reuse, contdExchanges Set-up closet/other small area for Student Supply Exchange  File folders, hanging folders, envelopes, binders, paperclips, pens, pencils, etc. Promote Exchange to teachers & staff  Encourage students to leave (or take) items Start a prom dress (& tuxedo) exchange for students or join a regional exchange List used musical instruments & sporting equipment in newsletter or on Website Northeast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  37. 37. Step Five: Determine Wherethe Materials will Go Identify a hauler or recycling center  Check with school trash hauler  Negotiate with hauler to offer reduced rate for hauling both trash & paper  Check Internet or telephone directory under ―recycling‖ for recycling haulers Transport materials to local recycling center or transfer station Northeast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  38. 38. Where the Materials WillGo, contd Organize a district-wide collection  Use school supply vehicles to collect materials  Take to a central school location for pick-up by hauler or for transport by school personnel to a recycling center Ask public works or highway department to provide hauling Northeast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  39. 39. Where the Materials WillGo, contd Can a local business or town office act as a drop-off point or provide collection? Is there a non-profit willing to collect materials? If no options for paper recycling exist, there may be agricultural outlets for paper (animal bedding or compost) Northeast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  40. 40. Tips Explore all options before setting up the collection Pooling resources with other schools, town offices, or businesses can work to everyone’s advantage  The greater the volume of material, the more cost effective it may be for a hauler to collect Northeast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  41. 41. Tips  Find out exactly what the hauler will accept or what is acceptable at the recycling center prior to setting up the program  Some haulers will only handle paper  Most recycling centers or transfer stations will accept paper & beverage containersNortheast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  42. 42. Step Six: Determine Storagefor the Collected Materials Consult with hauler  The hauler will typically provide containers for storage (large carts, dumpster-style containers) Self-transport  Devise system for easy transport o Small carts on wheels o Reusable bags or boxes Northeast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  43. 43. Storage, contd Storage areas for carts or bags  Hallways, closets, an empty room, or a small outside storage shed Consider safety, health, & fire codes when selecting storage area Northeast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  44. 44. Storage & Collection Bins Each classroom & office (each desk best) should have recycling bins Small containers, 15 - 25 gallons are best  Decorated cardboard boxes  Old trash cans (decorated & with recycling signage)  Plastic totes, such as curbside recycling or home storage containers Northeast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  45. 45. Classroom Container OptionsNortheast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  46. 46. Classroom Container OptionsNortheast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  47. 47. Beverage Container RecyclingBinsNortheast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  48. 48. Tips Contact your town or county to see if it can provide collection bins Solicit business or PTO sponsorship to purchase bins Look for grant funding Northeast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  49. 49. Step Seven: The In-SchoolCollection System Set-up a system for moving recyclable materials from the classrooms (& offices) to outside recycling storage container (or to larger carts stored inside) Determine:  Who will collect the material  How often will it be collected  How it will be collected Northeast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  50. 50. Classroom CollectionOptionsOption One Each classroom empties its recycling bin into a centralized cart  Carts can be located in hallways The recycling team or custodian takes central cart to outside bin (or to the curb for collection by a hauler, or a storage area for later transport to a recycling center) Northeast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  51. 51. Collection Options, contdOption Two Custodians empty recyclables from the classrooms & office areas  Could be done on an as-needed basis  Scheduled collection, e.g., one floor a day Northeast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  52. 52. Collection Options, contdOption Three The recycling team or another school group empties classroom containers  Classrooms can set the bins outside the classroom on a scheduled day  Students organize collection schedule— one floor a day, etc. Northeast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  53. 53. Tips Be sure to include offices & teacher work areas in the collection system If beverage containers are collected, these too must be factored in & a system designed for collection  Beverage containers may need to be collected on a daily basis to reduce potential for insect problems Northeast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  54. 54. Containers Classroom & office bins can be emptied into larger, centralized containers (30-60 gallons) located around the school  E.g., rolling carts or large reusable bags Carts may be able to be picked-up & emptied by the hauler  Check to see if the hauler provides cartsNortheast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  55. 55. Containers, cont’d Alternatively, smaller carts can be used & materials moved to outside storage bin  These carts or bags can also be rolled into the classroom, down hallways, & into office areas for collecting materialNortheast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  56. 56. Sample Collection CartsNortheast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  57. 57. Sample Collection CartsNortheast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  58. 58. Points of Collection Classrooms (mixed paper, beverage containers) Office areas & teacher work areas (mixed paper, cardboard, beverage containers) Library (newspaper, mixed paper) Break areas & hallways (vending machines–beverage containers) Northeast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  59. 59. Points of Collection, contd Near printers, copiers (paper) Cafeteria & kitchen (beverage containers, steel cans, cardboard) Supply rooms (cardboard) Athletic areas (beverage containers) Machine shop (metal, paper, used motor oil, antifreeze) Northeast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  60. 60. Tips Involve custodial staff in determining most effective way to haul & store recyclables  Even if custodians do not do the collection, this ensures that recyclables do not inadvertently end-up in trash or get contaminated with garbage Use same style recycling bins for all classrooms Label collection bins for recycling & acceptable material Northeast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  61. 61. Tips, contd Distinguish paper recycling bins from beverage container recycling bins by using different styles or colors Recycling bins should be easily distinguishable from trash bins Make sure storage bins meet fire safety codes Collected recyclables must be kept clean & dry Northeast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  62. 62. Step Eight: Publicity & Education  Develop a school recycling slogan & logo  Hold a design contest  Hold a kick-off event  Announce program to local media, on Facebook, Twitter, etc.  Have students design posters, educational displays, newsletter articles, & PA announcements  Show what can & cannot be recycled  Show how to recycle  Show importance of student participation  Boast about successNortheast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  63. 63. Publicity & Education, contd  Have recycling team do class presentations, skits, or raps  Conduct training sessions for teachers, cafeteria workers, & student leaders about what can & cannot be recycled, & why  Encourage teachers to incorporate recycling into curricula  Invite environmental speakers to speak about importance of recycling, careers in the environmental field, & local or regional solid waste issuesNortheast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  64. 64. School Environmental ClubPresentationNortheast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  65. 65. Sample DisplayNortheast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  66. 66. Sample DisplayNortheast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  67. 67. Sample DisplayNortheast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  68. 68. Step Nine: Troubleshooting & Monitoring Monitor recycling bins for contamination  This is most effectively done when material is collected or just following collection Respond quickly & appropriately to any contamination issues Assign classroom volunteers to monitor program Northeast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  69. 69. Monitoring, contd Keep an eye on program operations  Are the collection bins in the right place?  Are they overflowing too quickly?  Are the people in charge of the collection satisfied with the system?  Are the collection bins & storage areas neat & clean?  Is there enough signage?  Are there any problems with insects around beverage recycling bins? Northeast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  70. 70. Monitoring, contd Keep records of materials collected & reductions in trash disposal  May be able to decrease size of garbage dumpster, number of dumpsters, &/or frequency of collection Use EPA’s WARM Tool (http://www.epa.gov/climatechange/wycd /waste/calculators/Warm_home.html) to calculate energy savings & greenhouse gas emission reductions from the school’s recycling efforts Northeast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  71. 71. Monitoring, contd Regularly post recycling results Add new members to recycling team to avoid burnout Ask custodial staff for input about recycling efforts & suggestions for improvements  Recognize their contributions Northeast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  72. 72. Checking for Contaminants &Sorting MaterialsNortheast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  73. 73. Tips  Program monitoring & outreach activities must be ongoing & permanent part of recycling efforts  Be positive & rewarding  Consider contests & awards as way to reward participation & encourage students to recycle  Promote recycling tonnages, environmental benefits, contest winners, etc. on Website, Facebook, & school announcementsNortheast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  74. 74. Resources Available on NERC Website: Action Tip Sheets http://www.nerc.org/documents/index.html#S choolWaste Rural School Recycling Waste Assessments   & Waste Audits Success  Waste Audit Sheets  School Composting Options  School Waste Assessment Form  Fundraising with  School Reuse Tips Recycling  Paper Use Reduction  Rural School Case in Schools Studies in Waste Reduction, Reuse, Rec  School Cafeteria ycling, & Composting Waste Reduction  School Web ResourcesNortheast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  75. 75. Resources Available on NERC Website, contd Presentations Case Studies  Rural School Recycling  Academy of the Holy Success Family, Connecticut  Composting at School  Sayles  Sustainable Recycling for School, Connecticut. Schools  John M. Clayton Implementing a Successful Elementary School, Delaware  Green School Program Hands to Earth: Educating  Pencader Charter High School, Delaware  for a Sustainable World Manchester Essex  Eldred School District, New York  (Massachusetts) Regional School District Composting  Liberty School  Mansfield Middle School District, New York (Connecticut) CompostingNortheast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org
  76. 76. Other Resources Tools to Reduce Waste in Schools http://www.epa.gov/wastes/education/toolkit.htm Materials for Recycling www.ciwmb.ca.gov/gallery/wasteprev Lesson Plans & Other Resources www.paperrecycles.org Go Green School Initiative www.gogreeninitiative.org Green School Resources http://www.dec.ny.gov/chemical/8803.html The Green Team www.thegreenteam.org Various School Resources www.kab.org Northeast Recycling Council, Inc. © September 2011 www.nerc.org

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