Crossing the Bridge from Mediator to Peace Builder: Transforming Local Capacities for Peace

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This workshop will engage participants in exploring what it takes to build partnerships, cross-cultural sensitivity and sustainable capacity for a culture of peace, drawing from case studies and Mediators Beyond Boders’ experience in countries around the world. Participants will learn how to bridge from being mediators to peacebuilders through elicitive practice, using trauma informed principles, appreciative inquiry and mediation techniques to transform local capacities for peace in a range of contexts, including in government institutions and universities, among tribal leaders and citizens, and in the practice of civil society organizations.

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Crossing the Bridge from Mediator to Peace Builder: Transforming Local Capacities for Peace

  1. 1. 10/29/13 Crossing the Bridge From Mediator to Peacebuilder: Transforming Local Capacities for Peace Building a more peace ‘able’ world Association for Conflict Resolution October 2013 MBB Mission Mission:  To  build  local  skills  for  peace  and   promote  media4on  worldwide 2 GOALS •  To  u'lize  cross  cultural  sensi'vity  and  elici've   approaches  to  shape  projects.   •  To  build  cohesion,  rela'onship  and  trust   through  the  use  of  construc've  conversa'ons.   •  To  integrate  the  use  of  trauma  informed   principles,  apprecia've  inquiry  and  media'on   techniques  in  transforming  local  capaci'es  for   3 peace.   1
  2. 2. 10/29/13 •  Sustainability   •  Invita'on   •  Local  partners   •  Contextual  research   4 What does MBB offer? MBB offers two types of projects: •  Capacity-building projects which build local conflict resolution or peacebuilding skills, and •  Advocacy projects which promote mediation worldwide and advance the use of appropriate conflict resolution processes in public policy arenas. WHAT MAKES MBB UNIQUE Systemic and holistic by invitation Volunteer professionals Multi year commitments Multi track interventions 6 2
  3. 3. 10/29/13 •  We work in underserved areas •  MBB does not act as a first-responder organization in any area, and does not work in areas where there is active war or other major violent conflict. 7 MBB currently has seven active projects:   •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  . Climate  Change  (UNFCCC  Observer  Project)   Colombia     Ecuador     Israel     Kenya   Liberia   Nepal   Sierra  Leone   8 CLIMATE CHANGE-ADVOCATING FOR MEDIATION 3
  4. 4. 10/29/13 The ISRAEL Project EXPLORING PARTNERSHIPS WITH COMMUNITY MEDIATION CENTERS 2009-­‐PRESENT     PARTICIPATION  IN   THE  LARGEST   CONFERENCE  ON   COMMUNITY   MEDIATION:   24  CENTERS  AND   OVER  400     PARTICIPANTS       DISCUSSING   COLLABORATIVE   PLANS  WITH   GISHURIM,  MOSAICA,   THE  JERUSALEM   INTERCULTURAL   CENTER  AND  THE   MINISTRY  OF  SOCIAL   WELFARE   4
  5. 5. 10/29/13 Capacity  Development   Projects     Projects  progress  through  3   phases:     •   Project  explora-on;     •   Project  assessment;  and     •   Project  implementa-on.     13 Mutual learning in: •  Community   sensi'zing   •  Peacebuilding   techniques   •  Cultural  prac'ces   •  Transla'ng  methods   into  prac'cal,   contextual   applica'ons   •  Dialogue   •  Trauma  support  and   resiliency  building   •  Grant-­‐wri'ng   •  Fiscal  management,  and   other  aspects  of   organiza'onal   development   CASE STUDIES LIBERIA  INITIATIVE   and  the     KENYA  INITIATIVE   5
  6. 6. 10/29/13 MBB Capacity Development Projects LIBERIAN  INITIATIVE 2007-­‐  PRESENT   In July 2007, MBB launched its first international project: The Liberian Initiative. The Liberian Initiative is still ongoing, and remains the largest MBB international project to date. Dialogue and facilitation training in Monrovia •  Established  a  media'on  service  for  and  by  refugees   in  a  refugee  camp   •  Enhanced  the  capacity  for  media'on  among  a  wide   range  of  Ghanaian  officials     •  Facilitated  the  safe  re-­‐integra'on  of  75  ex-­‐ combatants  in  community  following  voca'onal   training  and  psychosocial  support   •  Brought  together  women  of  nine  ethnic  groups  to   reweave  the  social  fabric  in  their  fractured  society   18 6
  7. 7. 10/29/13 Trauma Informed Principles •  ‘Psychosocial  Well-­‐being,’  defined  as  a  state  in  which   one  is  free  of  excessive  suffering  and  clinical   pathology  and  able  to  func'on  and  find  meaning  in   life,  preferred  over  a  PTSD  approach   •  The  provision  of  “trauma  informed  care”  is  a  seminal   concept  in  emerging  efforts  to  address  trauma  in  the   lives  of  children,  as  well  as  adults.  Trauma  informed   care  has  many  facets.   19 •  Survivor  of  repeated  trauma  challenges  fundamental   assump'ons  about  the  world.  Survivors  make  sense  of  the   world  based  on  their  trauma'c  experiences.  Their  reac'on  to   trauma  may  not  be  directly  related  in  obvious  ways  to  the   trauma'c  event.   •  Emphasis  is  on  looking  at  the  whole  person  and  apprecia'ng   the  context  in  which  that  person  is  living  their  life.   •  Goal  is  to  return  sense  of  control  and  autonomy  to  survivor.   Builds  skills.  Strength  based.     •  Open  and  genuine  collabora'on.  Par'cipants  have  choices   about  what  they  need  and  when,  and  who  provides  the   service.  Par'cipants  set  priori'es  for  services.   20 •  Trauma  work  may  be  considered  part  of  development  in  the   sense  that  it  enhances  locals’  capaci'es  to  manage  post-­‐ conflict  psychosocial  problems  in  ways  that  are  less  of  a   func'onal  burden.   •  Restora've  prac'ces  that  harmonize  the  tensions  between   forgiveness  with  impunity,  and  individual  and  societal  jus'ce.   •  Empowerment  of  local  narra'ves,  the  role  of  dialogue,   collec've  narra'ves,  iden'fica'on  of  resilience!     21 7
  8. 8. 10/29/13 Palaver:   integra'ng   conflict   resolu'on   prac'ces  in   tradi'onal   dispute   resolu'on   RE-INTEGRATION OF FEMALE EX COMBATANTS IN GBA COMMUNITY  MEETINGS   8
  9. 9. 10/29/13   CASE  STUDY   THE  KENYA  INITIATVE   25 HOW DID THE KENYA INITIATIVE BEGIN? 26 27 9
  10. 10. 10/29/13   Project  IniLaLon   • Contact  from  Kenya     Project  ExploraLon   • Ini'al  trips       28 EliciLve,  Systemic,  Conflict  sensiLve     Conflict  Sensi-ve   •  Assessing  the  conflict  dynamics,  both  local  and  regional   Elici-ve   •  The  assessment  developed  in  conversa'on  with  the   poten'al  partner,  exploring  needs  and  opportuni'es   Systemic   •  Looking  at  the  whole  system  –  people,  poli'cs,  culture,   social  systems,  networks,  economic  and  physical   infrastructure,  human  and  social  capital,  and  how  it  all   interrelates   29 We  need  to  do  a  project  assessment.     Where  do  we  start?   What  do  we  need  to  know?   What  are  the  first  ques'ons  that  come  to  mind?     30 10
  11. 11. 10/29/13 ConducLng  a  Project  Assessment  –  What   we  can  learn  from  the  peacebuilding  field   •  The  Basics:   –  Background  research  prior  to  traveling:   •  •  •  •  •  •  •  Analysis  of  culture/social/poliLcal  context  of  area/country   Analysis  of  conflict  in  area   Info  on  other  organizaLons  working  in  area   Info  from  partners   PotenLal  partners  to  contact   IniLal  schedule  of  meeLngs   Does  your  potenLal  partner  have  the  necessary  experience  or  special   experLse  in  the  region?     31   Assessment Team with Local Partner, Kenya Pastoralist Network Trust 33 11
  12. 12. 10/29/13 34 Learn from the Bush Samburu Manyatta meeting in Rumuruti 12
  13. 13. 10/29/13     What  did  we  learn?   37 •  Pastoralists  are  nomadic  herders,  represen'ng  less  than  20%   of  the  Kenyan  popula'on  and  mostly  living  in  the  most   remote  and  harsh,  arid  and  semi-­‐arid  areas  of  Kenya.   •  Post-­‐colonialism,  ethnic  tradi'ons,  small  arms  and  light   weapons  from  neighbors  such  as  Somalia,  climate  change,   marginaliza'on  by  Nairobi  and  poli'cal  manipula'on  bring   conflict  and  violence.   •  Exis'ng  grassroots  peacebuilding  efforts  limited  in  scope;   “peacebuilding  industry”  thrives  in  Kenya.   •  Promised  peace  dividends  such  as  water  and  schools  never   provided,  but  new  devolu'on  of  government  provides  hope.   38 KPN Approach •  Laikipia  Model  of  large  Peace  Caravans  with  ‘sons   and  daughters’  mobilized  out  of  Nairobi   •  Establish  local  peace  comminees  –  ongoing  local   structures  for  peace   •  Provide  training  and  collabora'on  with  government   and  NGOs   •  Mobilize  caravans  quickly  at  the  behest  of  GOK   39 13
  14. 14. 10/29/13     Developing  a  Project   40 Adaptability  and  Planning  for  Emergence   •  Important  to  maintain  ability  to  adapt  to  changing   circumstances,  funding  variability  and  culture   •  Revisit,  re-­‐envision  project  with  partners   •  Incorporate  peacebuilding  best  prac'ces  into  projects   –  Conflict  assessment   –  Reflec'ng  on  peace  prac'ce  model   –  For  grassroots  capacity  building,  evalua'on  that  is   reflec've,  emergent  and  learning  based   –  But  beware  of  mission  creep!     41 42 14
  15. 15. 10/29/13 43 44 45 15
  16. 16. 10/29/13 Emerging  Project   Ideas     •   Warriors  project   •   "Peace  dividends"     •   Systemic  and   emergent  capacity   development   •   Sharing  wisdom  from   "down  under  the   radar"     46 Case  Study   The  Warriors  Project     The  goal  of  The  Warriors  Project  is  to  promote  locally  sustainable   peace  and  human  security  in  remote  pastoralist  regions  of  Kenya   through  youth-­‐led  neotradi4onal  peacebuilding  and  civic   par4cipa4on   47 Theory  of  Change   •  The  assump'on  of  how  change  is  expected  to  occur   as  a  result  of  the  proposed  interven'on.   •  Open  ar'culated  as  “IF  we  do  ‘X’,  THEN  ‘Y’  will  occur,   BECAUSE  of  ‘Z’.   •  Used  in  support  of  logic  models  for  monitoring  and   evalua'on,  and  as  an  inquiry  tool  to  explore  project   logic  throughout  the  process.   48 16
  17. 17. 10/29/13 ReflecLng  on  Peace  PracLce  Model   •  RPP  matrix  used  either  in  full  or  broken  out  by   component  (e.g.  key  people/more  people,  individual-­‐ personal  change/socio-­‐poli'cal  change)   •  Key  driving  factors   •  Linkages  between  components   •  Criteria  of  effec'veness  (COE)   •  Theories  of  change     •  Systems  approach  to  conflict  analysis   49 Tools  for  AffecLng  “Peace  Writ  Large”   RPP  Matrix     More People Approaches Key People Approaches Individual/Personal Change Socio-political Change 50 Criteria  of  EffecLveness   •  The  effort  results  in  the  crea4on  or  reform  of  poli4cal  ins4tu4ons  to   handle  grievances  in  situa4ons  where  such  grievances  do,  genuinely,   drive  the  conflict.   •  The  effort  contributes  to  a  momentum  for  peace  by  causing   par4cipants  and  communi4es  to  develop  their  own  peace  ini4a4ves  in   rela4on  to  cri4cal  elements  of  context  analysis.   •  The  effort  prompts  people  increasingly  to  resist  violence  and   provoca4ons  to  violence.   •  The  effort  results  in  an  increase  in  people’s  security  and  in  their  sense   of  security.   •  The  effort  results  in  meaningful  improvement  in  inter-­‐group  rela4ons.   51 17
  18. 18. 10/29/13 How to Contact MBB www.MediatorsBeyondBorders.org Administrative Office: Mediators Beyond Borders International 1901 North Fort Myer Drive, Suite 405 Arlington, VA 22209, USA Phone: +1 (703) 528 6552 Fax: +1 (703) 528 5776 info@mediatorsbeyondborders.org 52 53 18

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