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Building DH Capacity Workshop 2016

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Ashley Sanders, “Building Capacity for DH Work in the Library and Beyond,” Digital Initiatives Symposium (University of San Diego, April 27, 2016).

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Building DH Capacity Workshop 2016

  1. 1. Ashley Sanders, Ph.D. Digital Scholarship Coordinator Claremont Colleges Library
  2. 2.  1. Introductions
  3. 3.  Agenda How do we build capacity for something that is often so new to the very people we’re trying to assist and support that they, themselves, cannot define what they need?
  4. 4. 1. Introductions 2. Firestarter 3. Affinity Map 4. 4 C’s 5. Impact- Effort 6. Case Study 7. Q&A
  5. 5.  3 minutes: Complete the following statement: My ideal DH community… 2. Firestarter Is… Makes… Does… Includes… Values… Is not… 1 minute: Choose the 4 most important to you & add them to the poster paper
  6. 6.  1. Cluster or group sticky notes in columns 2. Determine theme for each cluster or column & write it over that grouping 3. Reflection 3. Affinity Map
  7. 7.  Affinity Map Summary: Characteristics of Ideal DH Communities Institutional Support  Funding  Staffing  Space  Resources  Support from the top  Involves stakeholders @ all levels on campus  Understanding of time & money required to produce quality DH projects Values  Diversity  Inclusion: Accessible to all  Open, welcoming to all interested, regardless of discipline  Friendly  Community  Includes all voices, especially those historically silenced  Collaboration
  8. 8.  Affinity Map Summary: Characteristics of Ideal DH Communities Values/Ideals  Open access  Honors & instructs members on IP rights  Acknowledges privilege & power  Values methodologies & epistemologies of humanities  Makes a difference in the humanities Attitude  Always evolving  Open to failure  Willing to experiment  Playful  Creative  Unafraid  Challenges linear thinking
  9. 9.  Affinity Map Summary: Characteristics of Ideal DH Communities What it does  Tells stories  It’s more than digitization  Makes products discoverable  Makes connections between past & present  Engages students & brings them into the humanities  Empowers students, librarians & faculty to become content creators  Provides perspective & insight  Makes art Systems  Tech infrastructure to support digital projects  Access to digitized source material  Software  Hardware  Long-term preservation  Responsive design  Located in a physical space – the library
  10. 10.  Team Affinity Maps
  11. 11. Team Affinity Maps
  12. 12. Team Affinity Maps
  13. 13.  10 minute break
  14. 14.  Components: Parts of a DH program Characteristics: Features of a DH program Characters: People associated with a DH program Challenges: Obstacles associated with building a DH program 4. The Four C’s
  15. 15.  4. The Four C’s  Each team will be responsible for 1 C.  3 minutes to plan information gathering strategy  What do you want to know?  What questions will you ask?  5 minutes to gather information. 1 idea/note.  3 minutes for information analysis.  Analyze & organize your data. Post contents on matrix  Share findings
  16. 16.  4 C’s Components  Staffing, support, expertise  Technology & tech infrastructure  Expansive, Artistic, Narrative  Research tools  Projects  Repositories  Workflows  Metadata  Physical space  Organizational Anchor  Participants: students, faculty, librarians, staff Characteristics  Strong institutional support  Schools, departments, IT  Diversification in funding  Collaborative  Accessible/Findable  Project idea through completion  Working with students  Value-added to institution  Showcase projects/products  Cross pollination among disciplines but begins with humanities Components: Characteristics: Characters: Challenges:
  17. 17. Components: Characteristics: Characters: Challenges:4 C’s
  18. 18.  4 C’s Characters  DH Center Manager  Systems analyst  Instructors  A/V Specialists  Data Viz experts  Quantitative/Qualitative data analysts  Advancement officer  Risk & info sec specialist  Digital preservation expert  Graphic Designers  GIS expert  Visual Resources Librarian  Copyright officer  Student workers  Community members Challenges  Institutional buy-in  Determining service needs  Encouraging interdisciplinarity & collaboration  Funding  Getting word out  Terminology  Fuzzy project ideas  Process/workflows to complete projects Components: Characteristics: Characters: Challenges:
  19. 19. Components: Characteristics: Characters: Challenges:
  20. 20.  5. Impact & Effort Matrix What do we need to do to build DH capacity, given the ideas generated in the previous activities? 10 minutes: Generate ideas (1 per sticky note) as a group
  21. 21.  High Impact/Low Effort High Impact/High Effort Low Impact/Low Effort Low Impact/High Effort 5. Impact & Effort Matrix Impact Effort
  22. 22. High Impact/Low Effort:  Identify powerful faculty champion(s)  Write DH into institutional strategic plan  Identify potential projects  Transfer existing content to repository  Kickstarter program for faculty  Meet-ups & mailing list  List of resources  Marketing  Inventory talent, interest, tech capacity  Define core values High Impact/High Effort:  Project management  Central coordinator to connect people as team  Dedicated financial support  Talented people willing to experiment & fail  Create center  Offering DH courses  Training subject librarians in DH  Determine priorities in face of resource constraints  Establish life cycle of rpoject Low Impact/Low Effort:  Inventory which humanities projects already exist but are not necessarily digital Low Impact/High Effort:  Form a project committee/advisory group  Award competition Impact Effort
  23. 23. High Impact/Low Effort High Impact/High Effort Low Impact/Low Effort Low Impact/High Effort
  24. 24. High Impact/Low Effort High Impact/High Effort Low Impact/Low Effort Low Impact/High Effort
  25. 25. High Impact/Low Effort High Impact/High Effort Low Impact/Low Effort Low Impact/High Effort
  26. 26.  Reflection Take 5-10 minutes to jot down ideas about what you’d like to try/apply at your home campus
  27. 27.  10 minute break Be sure to check out the ideas of other groups!
  28. 28.   Supporting Digital Humanities: Report of a CNI Executive Roundtable Held Dec. 7 & 8, 2014 (May 2016); See also What We Heard at the Roundtable: Transcript of a Project Briefing, CNI Fall 2014 Membership Meeting, Dec. 9, 2014.  Coalition for Networked Information. Digital Scholarship Centers: Trends and Good Practice https://www.cni.org/events/cni- workshops/digital-scholarship-centers-cni-workshop (Please read the report and at least 3 institutional profiles)  Bethany Nowviskie, Too Small to Fail (October 13, 2012 blog post) http://nowviskie.org/2012/too-small-to-fail/  Alix Keener, The Arrival Fallacy: Collaborative Research Relationships in the Digital Humanities, http://digitalhumanities.org:8081/dhq/vol/9/2/000213/0002 13.html Resources
  29. 29.   Edward L. Ayers, “Does Digital Scholarship Have a Future?” Monday, August 5, 2013, EDUCAUSE Review, http://er.educause.edu/articles/2013/8/does-digital-scholarship- have-a-future  Nancy L. Maron and Sarah Pickle, Sustaining the Digital Humanities: Host Institution Support beyond the Start-Up Phase (Ithaka S+R, June 18, 2014). http://www.sr.ithaka.org/wp- content/mig/SR_Supporting_Digital_Humanities_20140618f.pdf  Nancy Maron, “The Digital Humanities Are Alive and Well and Blooming: Now What?”EDUCAUSE Review, http://er.educause.edu/articles/2015/8/the-digital-humanities- are-alive-and-well-and-blooming-now-what  Miriam Posner, “Here and There: Creating DH Community,” http://miriamposner.com/blog/here-and-there- creating-dh-community/ Resources

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