Photo Tour of theSmithsonian Astrophysical Observatory(Cambridge, MA)As the Smithsonian Center for Learning & DigitalAcces...
Alison Doane, Curator of Plate Stacks, pulls one of the half-millionglass plates from a storage cabinet housed at the Obse...
Camera to digitize plates. This will make these images fromthe 19th century through the 1970’s available to astronomers(pr...
Glass plate and "Fly Spanker" calibrator shows HarvardComputers notes regarding brightnesses of stars.
Halleys Comet -- taken during 1910appearance!
Glass Plate of Large Magellanic Cloud (small galaxyneighboring our Milky Way), visible from SouthernHemisphere. Taken in 1...
“Harvard Computers” -- women astronomerswho did much of the eye-straining visualanalysis of glass plates. This picture tak...
Moon Daguerreotype -- taken by Great Refractor onFeb 26, 1852. One of first Moon photos ever taken!
‘The Great Refractor’ (est. 1847) was the telescope that tookthe 1st astrophotograph- a daguerrotype of the star Vega in18...
Dan & Ashley from our team sitting where many sciencegreats of the past sat—including Albert Einstein!
Ashley & Dan from our team check out the MicroObservatoryremotely controlled telescopes. (Behind them, you can see‘The Gre...
The “insides” of one of the MicroObservatorytelescopes- meet ‘Ed’!
Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO) videowall -- most recentseveral days data from this NASA satellite on constantdisplay. Ins...
Stunning data images of the sun in close toreal-time!
We’ll be broadcasting live in just a few minutesfrom the site of Director Ed Pickering’s RotatingDesk, (July 1902)
Special thanks to the staff of the SmithsonianAstrophysical Observatory for sharing thisbehind-the-scenes tour!We’ll be ri...
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Photo Tour of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory

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Photo Tour of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory

  1. 1. Photo Tour of theSmithsonian Astrophysical Observatory(Cambridge, MA)As the Smithsonian Center for Learning & DigitalAccess team prepared for this online conference,we got the behind-the-scenes tour of SAO-checkout these photos & tidbits from Tuesday 6/11!
  2. 2. Alison Doane, Curator of Plate Stacks, pulls one of the half-millionglass plates from a storage cabinet housed at the Observatory.
  3. 3. Camera to digitize plates. This will make these images fromthe 19th century through the 1970’s available to astronomers(professional and non) worldwide
  4. 4. Glass plate and "Fly Spanker" calibrator shows HarvardComputers notes regarding brightnesses of stars.
  5. 5. Halleys Comet -- taken during 1910appearance!
  6. 6. Glass Plate of Large Magellanic Cloud (small galaxyneighboring our Milky Way), visible from SouthernHemisphere. Taken in 1948.
  7. 7. “Harvard Computers” -- women astronomerswho did much of the eye-straining visualanalysis of glass plates. This picture takenabout 1913.
  8. 8. Moon Daguerreotype -- taken by Great Refractor onFeb 26, 1852. One of first Moon photos ever taken!
  9. 9. ‘The Great Refractor’ (est. 1847) was the telescope that tookthe 1st astrophotograph- a daguerrotype of the star Vega in1850!
  10. 10. Dan & Ashley from our team sitting where many sciencegreats of the past sat—including Albert Einstein!
  11. 11. Ashley & Dan from our team check out the MicroObservatoryremotely controlled telescopes. (Behind them, you can see‘The Great Refractor’)
  12. 12. The “insides” of one of the MicroObservatorytelescopes- meet ‘Ed’!
  13. 13. Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO) videowall -- most recentseveral days data from this NASA satellite on constantdisplay. Instruments that took these images built at SAO.
  14. 14. Stunning data images of the sun in close toreal-time!
  15. 15. We’ll be broadcasting live in just a few minutesfrom the site of Director Ed Pickering’s RotatingDesk, (July 1902)
  16. 16. Special thanks to the staff of the SmithsonianAstrophysical Observatory for sharing thisbehind-the-scenes tour!We’ll be right back with an interactive onlineconversation with Joe DePasquale and MaryDussault.Stay tuned!

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