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BUILDING A SHOPPING COMPLEX FOR THE GENERATION X (GEN X)

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MKT 750 MARKETING MANAGEMENT
MBA
Credit to my team member;
Lydia
Muhammad Ashraf Danish
Noor Hafiza
Nor Ermi Diana
Nur Shazreen Nadia
Wan Norafidah

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BUILDING A SHOPPING COMPLEX FOR THE GENERATION X (GEN X)

  1. 1. BUILDING A SHOPPING COMPLEX FOR THE GENERATION X (GEN X) MKT 750 MARKETING MANAGEMENT Presented by  Lydia  Muhammad Ashraf Danish  Noor Hafiza  Nor Ermi Diana  Nur Shazreen Nadia  Wan Norafidah
  2. 2. GEN X
  3. 3. THE CRITICAL SUCCESS FACTORS IN SHOPPING COMPLEXES MANAGEMENT THE OPPORTUNITIES & THREATS IN BUILDING A SHOPPING COMPLEX FOR GENERATION X CONTEXT (ENVIRONMENTAL) THAT WILL EFFECT YOUR NEW SHOPPING COMPLEX THE CHARACTERISTIC OF CUSTOMERS, MARKET SIZE, THEIR NEEDS AND WANTS, THE DIFFERENT SEGMENTS AND FUTURE TRENDS/SHIFTS THE COMPETITIVE LANDSCAPE, THEIR RELATIVE STRENGTH AND WEAKNESSES AND TRENDS IN COMPETITIVE ENVIRONMENT THE SHOPPING COMPLEX DEVELOPMENT IN MALAYSIA THE DIFFERENT TYPES OF SHOPPING CENTRES CONTENT
  4. 4. THE OPPORTUNITIES & THREATS IN BUILDING A SHOPPING COMPLEX FOR GENERATION X CONTEXT (ENVIRONMENTAL) THAT WILL EFFECT YOUR NEW SHOPPING COMPLEX THE CHARACTERISTIC OF CUSTOMERS, MARKET SIZE, THEIR NEEDS AND WANTS, THE DIFFERENT SEGMENTS AND FUTURE TRENDS/SHIFTS THE COMPETITIVE LANDSCAPE, THEIR RELATIVE STRENGTH AND WEAKNESSES AND TRENDS IN COMPETITIVE ENVIRONMENT THE SHOPPING COMPLEX DEVELOPMENT IN MALAYSIA THE DIFFERENT TYPES OF SHOPPING CENTRESTHE CRITICAL SUCCESS FACTORS IN SHOPPING COMPLEXES MANAGEMENT  Wan Norafidah
  5. 5. 1. Location 2. Size 3. Accessibility 4. Design and layout 5. Anchor tenants 6. Trade mix 7. Shopping environment 8. Promotion 9. Visibility THE CRITICAL SUCCESS FACTORS IN SHOPPING COMPLEXES MANAGEMENT
  6. 6.  Good location: Allow ready access Attract large no. of customer Increase the potential sales of retail outlets 1. LOCATION  Ideal of good location:  Located near public transportation  Enjoy all day traffic  Have a big catchment population  Provide transport and parking facilities
  7. 7. 2. SIZE  Refers to its gross floor area  The size should be relevant to the size of the market that it intends to serve.  Size and quality of facilities are also relevant 3. ACCESSIBILITY  Accessibility depends on the layout, condition and congestion of the access road.  E.g. : provide access maps, efficient parking operation.  Able to attract pedestrian to pass through the shopping centre.  Provide covered footbridge linking all shopping centres.  Near the side of road and transportation may benefit from a higher volume of traffic passing through.
  8. 8. 4. DESIGN AND LAYOUT  Satisfy consumer preferences and provide a differentiated image.  The latest trends in design are energy conservation and environmentally friendly operation.  Travelling distance from one shop to another must not too far.  Good design for the pedestrian to visit all parts of the centre on one trip without having to walk through the same are more than once.
  9. 9. 5. TRADE MIX  To create a proper trade mix for a shopping centre, one must study the population of prospective customers to determine what they likely to buy.  Data on population size, age and family or household composition; leve;s of education, income and homeownership (versus renting); and ethnic consideration must taken into consideration. 6. SHOPPING ENVIRONMENT  A shopping centre must be updated by altering designs regularly so as to provide a trendy outlook to attract shopper.  Special features like fountains and landscaping can create luxurious atmosphere.  Comfortable and spacious environment will invite people walking around.  Attractive lighting will bring about the mood of buying.
  10. 10. 7. PROMOTION  Marketing refers to the lasing, advertising and promotion and public relations activities.  Marketing is important for shopping centre as it can maximum the profitability of the centre, generate traffic flow and increase sale. 8. VISIBILITY  Shopping centre should be visible to vehicular and foot traffic because shopping is impulse-based.  Good visibility improves a centre’s accessibility.  Signage of the shopping centre are important for providing visual cues to the shoppers.
  11. 11. THE OPPORTUNITIES & THREATS IN BUILDING A SHOPPING COMPLEX FOR GENERATION X CONTEXT (ENVIRONMENTAL) THAT WILL EFFECT YOUR NEW SHOPPING COMPLEX THE CHARACTERISTIC OF CUSTOMERS, MARKET SIZE, THEIR NEEDS AND WANTS, THE DIFFERENT SEGMENTS AND FUTURE TRENDS/SHIFTS THE COMPETITIVE LANDSCAPE, THEIR RELATIVE STRENGTH AND WEAKNESSES AND TRENDS IN COMPETITIVE ENVIRONMENT THE SHOPPING COMPLEX DEVELOPMENT IN MALAYSIA THE DIFFERENT TYPES OF SHOPPING CENTRES THE CRITICAL SUCCESS FACTORS IN SHOPPING COMPLEXES MANAGEMENT Lydia
  12. 12. THE DIFFERENT TYPES OF SHOPPING CENTRES • A shopping center is a building or set of buildings that contain a variety of retail units, with interconnecting walkways enabling visitors to easily walk from unit to unit. (Ho, 2009) • A shopping centre involves a large scale of investment in terms of financial expenditure, length of time for building the project and the various parties involved. (Ho, 2009) TYPES OF SHOPPING CENTER
  13. 13. • Regional center: provides a full range of shopping services comparable to those found in a small central business district. • Super regional center: with over 800,000 sq ft of gross leasable area, three or more anchors, mass merchant, more variety, fashion apparel, and serves as the dominant shopping venue. • Neighborhood center: a small-scale malls serving the local neighborhood. They typically have a supermarket or a drugstore as an anchor, and are commonly arranged in a strip mall format. • Community center: a larger than neighborhood centers and offer a wider range of goods. Usually feature two anchor stores. May also follow a strip configuration, or may be L- or U-shaped. • Lifestyle center: mixed-used commercial development that combines the traditional retail functions of a shopping mall with leisure amenities oriented towards upscale consumers. • Power center: are large shopping centers that almost exclusively feature several big-box retailers as their anchors. • Theme/festival center: have distinct unifying themes that are followed by their individual shops as well as their architecture. They are usually located in urban areas and cater to tourists. • Outlet center: which manufacturers sell their products directly to the public through their own stores. It operated by retailers selling returned goods and discontinued products, often at heavily reduced prices.
  14. 14. According to Christaller, W. in his study on Central Places in Southern Germany, Englewood Cliffs, 1966, defined shopping center as below: • Regional Mall: includes a number of variations including Regional Shopping Center, Regional Corridor, and Regional Community Center. • Power Centers: also referred to as Power Community Centers and Power Retail Centers. • Lifestyle Centers: includes Lifestyle Regional Malls • Mixed-use Centers: includes MU Recreation, MU Office/Retail Complexes. • Shopping-Center-Mall: generic category includes such labels as Centers, Enclosed Malls, Malls, Shopping Centers, Shopping Malls, and Associated Centers • Specialty Centers: covers a range of special-purpose centers including Market Centers, Marketplaces, Festival, Promenade, Retail and Entertainment, and Town Centers. • Street Retail: includes Downtown Retail and Street Front Retail.
  15. 15. Retail research has evolved over the past sixty years. Christaller's early work on central place theory, with its simplistic combination of range and threshold has been advanced to include complex consumer shopping patterns and retailer behavior in agglomerated retail centers. (Eppli & Benjamin, 1994)
  16. 16. • Retailers must adapt to attract the older shoppers who will dominate the shopping centres of the future. • Retailers who can get the formula right have a great opportunity to take market share from some of today's brands who are still creating products for the Gen X generation.
  17. 17. THE OPPORTUNITIES & THREATS IN BUILDING A SHOPPING COMPLEX FOR GENERATION X CONTEXT (ENVIRONMENTAL) THAT WILL EFFECT YOUR NEW SHOPPING COMPLEX THE CHARACTERISTIC OF CUSTOMERS, MARKET SIZE, THEIR NEEDS AND WANTS, THE DIFFERENT SEGMENTS AND FUTURE TRENDS/SHIFTS THE COMPETITIVE LANDSCAPE, THEIR RELATIVE STRENGTH AND WEAKNESSES AND TRENDS IN COMPETITIVE ENVIRONMENT THE DIFFERENT TYPES OF SHOPPING CENTRESTHE SHOPPING COMPLEX DEVELOPMENT IN MALAYSIA THE CRITICAL SUCCESS FACTORS IN SHOPPING COMPLEXES MANAGEMENT  Noor Hafiza
  18. 18. THE SHOPPING COMPLEX DEVELOPMENT IN MALAYSIA 1963 The evolution of shopping centres development in Kuala Lumpur started with the opening of the fish supermarket, the Weld Supermarket in Weld Road (now Jalan Raja Chulan). After that - Emporium Selangor, Globe Silk Store, Yuyi Emporium and Batu Road Supermarket. All these supermarkets began their early development as neighbourhood centres. 1990 The third generation of shopping centres, from the 1990s to the present; a) has seen the birth of new giants, with the size determine the winner of competition b) mega sized centres with vast retail space, often spanning more than two million square feet and with multiple anchor tenants, multiple mini anchors and a host of shop lots c) huge car parks accommodating more than 3000 vehicles are common, with a network of internal roads and access to main roads and highways. Mega shopping centres - Sunway Pyramid, Mid Valley Megamall, One Utama Shopping Centre, and Tropicana City Mall. a) All the mega sized shopping centres have their individual niche markets and are thriving even facing competition with each other’s. b) For example, Sunway Pyramid integrated with its own planned resort - Sunway Lagoon. Without exception, all shopping centres must have good or exceptional merchandise mix and strong retail attractions in order to succeed in the face of stiff competition.
  19. 19. 2010 Government unveiled an Economic Transformation Program (ETP) which was to launch Malaysia into the high-income country (USD 16,000 per capita) by 2020. In line with this 12 areas have been identified as National Key Economic Area (NKEAs) which mission is to implement high-impact projects that will trigger a multiplier effect on the overall economic growth. The wholesale and retail business along with the regional development of Kuala Lumpur and the Klang Valley are now assigned as the National Growth Conurbation (NGC) to serve as an international trading centre of the country. Needless to say, shopping centres as a vital component of NGC retail sector will be playing a catalyst role in the years leading to 2020.
  20. 20. FUTURE Outside Kuala Lumpur, the Klang Valley zone is a cluster of major urban areas that are reaching saturated development. These areas consist of Petaling Jaya, Shah Alam, Gombak, Kajang, Ampang and Bangi. The pace and pressure of development in these areas have been such that even slums and dilapidated areas are not spared. Reuse of urban buildings and areal redevelopment has been practised. With the inception of the ETP and the NKEAs the development strategy for the Klang valley is to provide quality urban life and environment through the provision of integrated public transport services, travel demand management, world-class infrastructure and the greening of urban centres. In addition, the quality of city services is to be substantially improved and upgraded to support economic development and the distribution of settlements in the area.
  21. 21. THE OPPORTUNITIES & THREATS IN BUILDING A SHOPPING COMPLEX FOR GENERATION X THE CHARACTERISTIC OF CUSTOMERS, MARKET SIZE, THEIR NEEDS AND WANTS, THE DIFFERENT SEGMENTS AND FUTURE TRENDS/SHIFTS THE COMPETITIVE LANDSCAPE, THEIR RELATIVE STRENGTH AND WEAKNESSES AND TRENDS IN COMPETITIVE ENVIRONMENT THE SHOPPING COMPLEX DEVELOPMENT IN MALAYSIA THE DIFFERENT TYPES OF SHOPPING CENTRESCONTEXT (ENVIRONMENTAL) THAT WILL EFFECT YOUR NEW SHOPPING COMPLEX THE CRITICAL SUCCESS FACTORS IN SHOPPING COMPLEXES MANAGEMENT  Muhammad Ashraf Danish
  22. 22. CONTEXT (ENVIRONMENTAL) THAT WILL EFFECT YOUR NEW SHOPPING COMPLEX Osuagwu, (2009), Ekpunobi, (2008), Anugwon (2005), Ogundele (2005), Kotler (2003), Imaga (2003), Stoner et al (2002), and Wilson, et al (1992), external environmental factors that influence business organisations operations can be categorized into economic factors, social factors, political factors, and technological factors
  23. 23. POLITICAL • refer to the degree of government intervention • Malaysian political condition not really stable • money scandal and corruption • foreign investors selling its stocks • Retail Group Malaysia managing director, Tan Hai Hsin the current political situation is affecting the consumer sentiment level or buying mood of Malaysian consumers ECONOMICAL • include the inflation rate, exchange rate, interest rate, employment/ unemployment rate and other economic growth indicators • depreciation of the ringgit is causing higher import costs • GST in April has affected all retail sub sectors SOCIAL • include career attributes, age distribution, population and its growth rate, and safety awareness • example is Woman Parking created for a single lady driver, Setia City Mall’ Parklife TECHNOLOGICAL • technological changes, R&D activity, obsolescence rate, automation and of course, innovation • example like Berjaya Times Square their indoor theme park
  24. 24. THE OPPORTUNITIES & THREATS IN BUILDING A SHOPPING COMPLEX FOR GENERATION X CONTEXT (ENVIRONMENTAL) THAT WILL EFFECT YOUR NEW SHOPPING COMPLEX THE CHARACTERISTIC OF CUSTOMERS, MARKET SIZE, THEIR NEEDS AND WANTS, THE DIFFERENT SEGMENTS AND FUTURE TRENDS/SHIFTS THE SHOPPING COMPLEX DEVELOPMENT IN MALAYSIA THE DIFFERENT TYPES OF SHOPPING CENTRESTHE COMPETITIVE LANDSCAPE, THEIR RELATIVE STRENGTH AND WEAKNESSES AND TRENDS IN COMPETITIVE ENVIRONMENT THE CRITICAL SUCCESS FACTORS IN SHOPPING COMPLEXES MANAGEMENT  Nur Shazreen Nadia
  25. 25. THE COMPETITIVE LANDSCAPE, THEIR RELATIVE STRENGTH AND WEAKNESSES AND TRENDS IN COMPETITIVE ENVIRONMENT COMPETITIVE LANDSCAPE Competitive Landscape analysis identifies your competitors online and offline. It involves a systematic analysis of the current environment and what they are doing in the organic search space. It is a form of analysis that helps a business identify its primary online and offline rivals. For example, a competitive landscape analysis might start with an attempt to identify and understand competitors, followed by an analysis of their strengths and weaknesses and how the target business can improve upon what its competition is doing.
  26. 26. PRIMARY COMPETITOR Gamuda Walk Gamuda Walk is a unique oval-shaped building designed to cater not only young people, but also with families. As a landmark in the city of Myrtle, Gamuda Walk has a variety of retailers ranging from food and drink, service, health and beauty, entertainment, and groceries. It is also suitable as a place to gather with friends and relax with family members while shopping. Giant Kota Kemuning Giant is the largest hypermarket and supermarket retail chain in Malaysia, holding 10% market share. Since being acquired by Dairy Farm International, the brand has been undergoing a -year period of building and improving the retail chain, making Giant the undisputed leader in Malaysia’s retail sector. Giant is a 60-year-old Malaysian brand built on its ability to deliver low process every day to consumers. The Government has named many of Giant’s stores as its “low price” partner.
  27. 27. SECONDARY COMPETITOR Mydin Mall, USJ Subang MYDIN wholesale hypermarket opened its doors on Aug 19 in USJ 1 Subang Jaya. The hypermarket is the first ever for Mydin Mohamed Holdings Berhad and an addition to the 23 emporiums that the company owns throughout the country. The retail space area consists of the Rasa Village food court, food joints, various tenants, a 24-hour MyMart convenience store, an indoor childrens' play corner called Dino Park, the outdoor patio featuring open-air cafes and the RM1.2mil 168-inch LED screen, and, of course, the supermarket. WEAKNESS: Lack of parking space and Poor staff management
  28. 28. Aeon Bukit Raja AEON CO. (M) BHD. (formerly known as Jaya Jusco Stores Bhd.) is a leading retailer in Malaysia with a total revenue of RM3.73 billion in the financial year ended 31st December 2009. The Company was incorporated on 15 September 1984. AEON Bukit Raja is located at Klang, just near to Seksyen 7 Shah Alam. AEON Bukit Raja have a lot to offer, from groceries, clothing, eateries and even cinema. WEAKNESS; Poor management of shopping complex, Limited parking space and Limited clothing line for Gen X
  29. 29. Tesco Extra Shah Alam Tesco Stores (Malaysia) Sdn Bhd owns and operates hypermarkets in Malaysia. It offers fresh produce, groceries, household items, and apparel; and its own food and non-food products. WEAKNESS: Paid parking and Limited Shops
  30. 30. THE OPPORTUNITIES & THREATS IN BUILDING A SHOPPING COMPLEX FOR GENERATION X CONTEXT (ENVIRONMENTAL) THAT WILL EFFECT YOUR NEW SHOPPING COMPLEX THE COMPETITIVE LANDSCAPE, THEIR RELATIVE STRENGTH AND WEAKNESSES AND TRENDS IN COMPETITIVE ENVIRONMENT THE SHOPPING COMPLEX DEVELOPMENT IN MALAYSIA THE DIFFERENT TYPES OF SHOPPING CENTRESTHE CHARACTERISTIC OF CUSTOMERS, MARKET SIZE, THEIR NEEDS AND WANTS, THE DIFFERENT SEGMENTS AND FUTURE TRENDS/SHIFTS THE CRITICAL SUCCESS FACTORS IN SHOPPING COMPLEXES MANAGEMENT  Nor Ermi Diana
  31. 31. THE CHARACTERISTIC OF CUSTOMERS, MARKET SIZE, THEIR NEEDS AND WANTS, THE DIFFERENT SEGMENTS AND FUTURE TRENDS/SHIFTS WHO ARE THEY?  Accept diversity  Pragmatic / practical  Self-reliant / individualistic  Reject rules  Killer life – living on the edge  Mistrust institutions  Multitask  Want security / stability  Goals and objective oriented  Adaptable  Able to manage time  Gets work done  Responsible  Team-player
  32. 32. MENTORING DOS  Casual  Friendly work environment  Involvement  Flexibility and freedom  A place to learn
  33. 33. THEY SEEK PRODUCT INFORMATION THEY RESPOND TO DIGITAL AND TRADITIONAL ADVERTISING THEY’RE BRAND LOYAL THEY VALUE DIVERSITY AND INDEPENDENCE SHOPPING ATTITUDES
  34. 34. 1) Geographic: Segmenting by region, city or other geographic basis. In this case, our geographic segmentation is focused on Gen X who live in Kota Kemuning, Shah Alam. 2) Demographic: Segmenting based on identifiable population characteristics of Gen X such as their age, occupation, marital status and so on. 3) Psychographic: This segmentation approach involves an understanding of the Gen X’es lifestyle, interests, and opinions. 4) Behavioral: Segmenting the market based on the Gen X relationship with the type of retailers and brands or the shopping centers. Example includes the lifestyle either they are working single adults or retirees with families and so on. 5) Benefits sought: This approach segments consumer amongst Gen X on the basis of specific benefits they are seeking from the shopping centers, such as convenience, or leisure, or value, and so on. MARKET SEGMENTATION
  35. 35. CONTEXT (ENVIRONMENTAL) THAT WILL EFFECT YOUR NEW SHOPPING COMPLEX THE CHARACTERISTIC OF CUSTOMERS, MARKET SIZE, THEIR NEEDS AND WANTS, THE DIFFERENT SEGMENTS AND FUTURE TRENDS/SHIFTS THE COMPETITIVE LANDSCAPE, THEIR RELATIVE STRENGTH AND WEAKNESSES AND TRENDS IN COMPETITIVE ENVIRONMENT THE SHOPPING COMPLEX DEVELOPMENT IN MALAYSIA THE DIFFERENT TYPES OF SHOPPING CENTRESTHE OPPORTUNITIES & THREATS IN BUILDING A SHOPPING COMPLEX FOR GENERATION X THE CRITICAL SUCCESS FACTORS IN SHOPPING COMPLEXES MANAGEMENT
  36. 36.  Complete Facilities Diaper change room Shopping mall benches  Mix of tenants to cater the family members needs.
  37. 37.  Wrong tenant selection  Inadequate facilities will be an advantage to the competitors THE OPPORTUNITIES & THREATS IN BUILDING A SHOPPING COMPLEX FOR GENERATION X

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