steel structural basics

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steel structural basics

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steel structural basics

  1. 1. PowerPoint® Presentation Chapter 4 Structural Steel Construction Structural Steel Construction • Structural Steel Construction Methods • Structural Steel Members • Fastening Systems • Panel Members
  2. 2. Chapter 4 — Structural Steel Construction Structural steel members are erected, braced, and secured together to create a structural framework.
  3. 3. Chapter 4 — Structural Steel Construction In beam and column construction, beams and girders support floor and roof loads and distribute the loads to the vertical columns.
  4. 4. Chapter 4 — Structural Steel Construction In long span construction, long distances are spanned with built-up structural steel girders and trusses.
  5. 5. Chapter 4 — Structural Steel Construction In wall bearing construction, horizontal steel beams and joists are supported by other construction materials such as masonry.
  6. 6. Chapter 4 — Structural Steel Construction Pre-engineered metal buildings consist of prefabricated structural steel members including beams, columns, girts, and trusses.
  7. 7. Chapter 4 — Structural Steel Construction Erection plans provide information regarding structural steel construction.
  8. 8. Chapter 4 — Structural Steel Construction A dimensioned grid of letters and numbers provides reference points on erection plans.
  9. 9. Chapter 4 — Structural Steel Construction Various types and grades of steel are used in structural steel construction.
  10. 10. Chapter 4 — Structural Steel Construction A variety of steel shapes are commonly used in structural steel construction. Standard abbreviations and designations are included on erection plans to indicate structural steel members.
  11. 11. Chapter 4 — Structural Steel Construction Shop drawings provide detailed information required for the fabrication of structural steel members.
  12. 12. Chapter 4 — Structural Steel Construction Columns are commonly constructed using M-, S-, or wide-flange shapes.
  13. 13. Chapter 4 — Structural Steel Construction Column locations are shown on erection plans with letter and number designations. Specific information about web depth and weight (in lb/ft) is provided for each column.
  14. 14. Chapter 4 — Structural Steel Construction Wide-flange beams are identified on erection plans with the letters “W” or “WF”.
  15. 15. Chapter 4 — Structural Steel Construction Structural steel beams are fabricated based on shop drawings.
  16. 16. Chapter 4 — Structural Steel Construction Open web steel joists span between beams and girders. The standard designation for open web steel joists includes the nominal depth (in inches), span classification (K, LH, or DLH), and chord diameter.
  17. 17. Chapter 4 — Structural Steel Construction Erection plans indicate structural steel joist spacing and installation information. Open web steel joists are secured to beams or other supporting members using bolts or by welding.
  18. 18. Chapter 4 — Structural Steel Construction A wide variety of structural steel shapes are joined together to form a truss. Common steel truss designs include the bowstring, flat, Howe, Pratt, scissors, and Warren.
  19. 19. Chapter 4 — Structural Steel Construction Bridging and braces maintain alignment between structural steel columns, beams, and joists and increase resistance to loads.
  20. 20. Chapter 4 — Structural Steel Construction Tie rods are used to brace across long distances.
  21. 21. Chapter 4 — Structural Steel Construction Proper bolt and nut installation is essential for proper structural fastener performance. Erection plan details are the primary reference for bolted connections.
  22. 22. Chapter 4 — Structural Steel Construction Ribbed bolts may be used where steel members are drawn tightly together before fastening. High-strength hex head bolts are identified with markings on the bolt head.
  23. 23. Chapter 4 — Structural Steel Construction Details provide information regarding welded connections.
  24. 24. Chapter 4 — Structural Steel Construction The standard format used for weld symbols provides information regarding location, length, and type of welded joint.
  25. 25. Chapter 4 — Structural Steel Construction Steel members may be cut to length using an oxyacetylene cutting torch.
  26. 26. Chapter 4 — Structural Steel Construction Metal floor decking, manufactured in a variety of designs and dimensions, is attached to the top of open web steel joists to create a floor platform.
  27. 27. Chapter 4 — Structural Steel Construction Erection plans provide information regarding metal decking installation.
  28. 28. Chapter 4 — Structural Steel Construction Metal decking may be used as bridge deck forms. The decking remains in place after the shores and falsework are removed.
  29. 29. Chapter 4 — Structural Steel Construction The exteriors of many light-gauge metal buildings are covered with prefinished metal panels.
  30. 30. Chapter 4 — Structural Steel Construction Metal roof decking is available in a variety of designs and dimensions.
  31. 31. Chapter 4 — Structural Steel Construction Roof decks may be formed of metal decking only or covered with waterproofing materials and insulation.

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