2013
ASIA PACIFIC
True creativity.

Proud to be 2013 China Consultancy of the Year.
True creativity is fired by imagination. The vision to s...
the

HOLMES
REPORT

CONSUL
TANCY
REPORT CARD

ASIA PACIFIC
Paul A. Holmes
CEO
Arun Sudhaman
Partner and Managing Editor
Gr...
Consultancy Report Card 2013 Asia Pacific

CONTENTS

While there have been
signs of a slowdown in
some of the world’s majo...
WE-Ad-Holmes2.pdf

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M

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CM

MY

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16/8/13

4:03 PM
Consultancy Report Card 2013 Asia Pacific

TEN
WAYS
TO

DESIGN
THE

AGENCY
OF THE

FUTURE
by Paul Holmes

THE FINANCIAL, P...
Consultancy Report Card 2013 Asia Pacific
My own optimistic view was challenged by
Marshall Sponder, an expert in web anal...
Editorial Feature
6. Being truly channel
neutral
The ideal of channel neutrality has been
on the communications industry a...
CONSULTANCIES
OF THE YEAR

Consultancy Report Card 2013 Asia Pacific

ASIA-PACIFIC
CONSULTANCY OF THE
YEAR:
MSLGROUP
A thi...
Consultancies of the Year

created a vibrant agency culture that with
relatively low senior turnover and a laudable
commit...
Consultancy Report Card 2013 Asia Pacific

Shiseido, Nike, and Kiehl’s, served by about
140 account staff, and last year s...
Consultancies of the Year

communications specialist—grow by around
20 percent in 2012. The firm continues
to derive a lar...
FREQUENTLY
ASKED QUESTIONS

Consultancy Report Card 2013 Asia Pacific

HOW WERE FIRMS SELECTED
FOR INCLUSION IN THE
CONSUL...
Alphabetical Index
A

M

R

APCO Worldwide ....................................... 22
Adfactors PR ..........................
Consultancy Report Card 2013 Asia Pacific
GEOGRAPHICAL INDEX
AUSTRALIA
Bite .................................................
Geographical Index
PHILIPPINES
Creative Crest ............................................. 53
Eon ..........................
Consultancy Report Card 2013 Asia Pacific
SPECIALTY INDEX
BOUTIQUE
In.Fom ...................................................
Specialty Index

MULTISPECIALIST

NON PROFIT

TECHNOLOGY

APCO Worldwide .......................................18
Adfacto...
Consultancy Report Card 2013 Asia Pacific

APCO WORLDWIDE

CHINA H HONG KONG H INDIA H INDONESIA H MALAYSIA H SINGAPORE H ...
National multi-office multi-specialty firms

INTELLECTUAL
LEADERSHIP
The firm’s Champion Brands survey has
helped to defin...
Consultancy Report Card 2013 Asia Pacific

BURSON-MARSTELLER
HONG KONG H AUSTRALIA H CHINA H INDIA H INDONESIA H KOREA H S...
Consultancy Report Card 2013 Asia Pacific

was promoted to lead the firm’s Shanghai
office.

CULTURE
During his first eigh...
TAKE ON THE
WORLD

Read how we built a
global challenger brand

lewispr.com/takeworld
Digital communications
from 25 offic...
Consultancy Report Card 2013 Asia Pacific

EDELMAN

HONG KONG H AUSTRALIA H CHINA H INDIA H INDONESIA H JAPAN H KOREA H
MA...
National multi-office multi-specialty firms

of the China operations; Gavin Coombes,
from digital agency Profero, as presi...
Consultancy Report Card 2013 Asia Pacific

FLEISHMAN-HILLARD

HONG KONG H AUSTRALIA H CHINA H INDIA H JAPAN H KOREA H MALA...
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2013 Asia-Pacific PR Agency Report Card

  1. 1. 2013 ASIA PACIFIC
  2. 2. True creativity. Proud to be 2013 China Consultancy of the Year. True creativity is fired by imagination. The vision to see what could be, unhindered by marketing discipline or communications channel. fleishmanhillard.com
  3. 3. the HOLMES REPORT CONSUL TANCY REPORT CARD ASIA PACIFIC Paul A. Holmes CEO Arun Sudhaman Partner and Managing Editor Greg Drury Partner and President - U.S. Operations Aarti Shah Senior Editor Annabel Davis Chief Internet Officer Amanda Busby UK Administrative Manager Patrick Drury Account Executive Celeste Picco Chief Administrative Officer James Beer/Logo Logo Design Anthony S. Picco Layout & Print Production The Holmes Report, Asia Pacific Consultancy Report Card 2013 (ISBN 978-0-9831883-9-1) is published once a year by The Holmes Group, Address: 271 West 47 Street, Suite 23-A, New York, NY 10036, USA Tel: (212) 333-2300; Fax: (212) 333-2624 Second class postage is pending at New York, NY, and additional offices. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Holmes Report, 271 West 47th Street, Suite 23-A, New York, NY 10036. Individual copies of The Holmes Report Asia Pacific Consultancy Report Card 2013 are priced at $69.95. www.holmesreport.com 1
  4. 4. Consultancy Report Card 2013 Asia Pacific CONTENTS While there have been signs of a slowdown in some of the world’s major developing economies over the past 12 months, growth of the public relations business in the Asia-Pacific region continues to outpace the rest of the world. But the real excitement is not continued double-digit increases in fee income, but the fact that the quality of work in major Asian markets is now matching – and in the best cases, surpassing – what we see in the major Englishspeaking markets and parts of western Europe. Not so very long ago, the vast majority of the work we saw in Asia was dominated by either special events or straightforward media relations and product publicity. But today, the range of work handled by PR agencies in Asia is considerably broader: corporate social responsibility, high-end corporate reputation work, financial communications around mergers and acquisitions, employee engagement. And of course, PR firms in Asia are competing with a wide range of agencies – advertising and digital – in the content creation business, while also taking the lead in social media, helping their clients engage with customers and other stakeholders and do what public relations has always done best— build relationships. The good news is that even if overall economic growth in the region does slow, there is still plenty of room for growth in the PR business—driven by broader mandates and higher value services. The firms profiled in this edition of The Holmes Report’s PR Consultancy Report Card understand that. They are among the leaders in expanding the industry’s role, enhancing its stature, and growing its size and profitability.”The need for good public relations has never been greater—corporate reputations are more challenged than ever in the social media age, and PR is playing an increasingly central role in brand-building as marketers recognize the need to truly engage with their consumers—and the firms in this volume are all well-positioned to benefit, whatever the broader economic context. Paul A. Holmes Paul Holmes, Editor EDITORIAL.............................................................................................................................................................. 02 TEN WAYS TO DESIGN THE AGENCY OF THE FUTURE..................................................... 04 CONSULTANCIES OF THE YEAR.......................................................................................................... 08 FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS (FAQ)...................................................................................... 12 ALPHABETICAL INDEX................................................................................................................................. 13 GEOGRAPHICAL INDEX.............................................................................................................................. 14 SPECIALTY INDEX............................................................................................................................................ 16 MULTINATIONAL, MULTI-SPECIALTY FIRMS................................................................................... 18 SPECIALISTS, BOUTIQUES, SMALL & MID-SIZE FIRMS....................................................... 44 2 www.holmesreport.com
  5. 5. WE-Ad-Holmes2.pdf C M Y CM MY CY CMY K 1 16/8/13 4:03 PM
  6. 6. Consultancy Report Card 2013 Asia Pacific TEN WAYS TO DESIGN THE AGENCY OF THE FUTURE by Paul Holmes THE FINANCIAL, POLITICAL, TECHNOLOGICAL AND media worlds have changed dramatically since the start of the 21st century. The global economic crisis, stagnation in the developed economies and growth in emerging markets, the rise of digital and social communications channels and the fragmentation of mainstream news outlets—these changes have all prompted new threats, and opened up new opportunities, for the public relations business. But to take advantage of these changes, public relations firms need new business models, new—and more diverse—talent, and new ways of thinking. To put it mildly, a public relations agency designed to meet the major challenges of the 20th century is unlikely to succeed in the 21st. Yet many of the world’s largest agencies, and a surprising number of midsize firms, continue to operate as if little has changed. Their infrastructure is a legacy from a different age, they have the same practice areas (often conflating actual practices such as corporate communications and product marketing, with industry sectors such as healthcare and technology), the same geographic structures, the same silos that served them (not always well) a decade or more ago. And many of them have failed to integrate new ideas, new technologies and new media, into the way they do business—often treating changes that ought to disrupt existing models as if they can simply be bolted on to the old model. Every time they do that, they miss an opportunity to create something genuinely disruptive, and they double down on their investment in traditional, vestigial, thinking—increasing their vulnerability to new firms with new ways of thinking. Many of the firms in this volume are already acting on some, perhaps many, of the ideas presented here. Some have radically restructured their business using their own ideas of what the future will demand. It’s doubtful whether anyone has all the answers when it comes to creating a new model for the public relations firm, but there are several ideas that all agencies should be exploring or considering. 1. Big data at the center Three years ago, I found myself in Davos—at a conference called Communication on Top—debating the future role of public relations in a shifting world. 4 www.holmesreport.com
  7. 7. Consultancy Report Card 2013 Asia Pacific My own optimistic view was challenged by Marshall Sponder, an expert in web analytics. His major complaint: that PR people did not understand how to use big data; his big prediction: that within a couple of years, every PR agency that wanted to be taken seriously would have a chief data officer, playing a significant role in the leadership of the organization. To say that progress on this score has been mixed would be extremely generous to the industry as a whole. There has been plenty of evidence that putting data and analytics at the center of communications can be incredibly powerful—the Obama re-election campaign is the most obvious example—but there has been incremental progress at best when it comes to using data to drive marketing and corporate communications more broadly, and only a handful of firms have anyone in a role roughly equivalent to Sponder’s chief data officer role. 2. Insight to drive meaningful creativity One reason data is important is that it lays the foundation for the kind of insight—into stakeholder attitudes, values, beliefs and actions—that ensure relevance. For too long, many public relations people—like the baseball scouts in Michael Lewis’s Moneyball who believed that they could identify a good baseball player based on little more than attitude, posture, and physique—have operated on the assumption that their years of experience alone meant that they knew a good PR campaign when they saw it. But all too often, the ideas they generated were creative just for the sake of it. They resonated with reporters, but not with the wider audiences they were intended to reach. They provided entertainment value but didn’t do anything to influence behavior. They were “great” PR ideas with no business benefit. Great data alone will not ensure great PR programming. But better data will lead to better insights. And better insights will lead to more creative public relations ideas—ideas that solve real business problems. 3. Understanding the human brain Edward L Bernays would insist loudly to anyone who would listen that public relations was “applied social science.” That was true in the industry’s early days, when Bernays and 6 www.holmesreport.com others were pioneering a new discipline, and it remains true today. What has changed is that we have new ways of understanding how the human mind words, how people decide what to believe, how they process information, how they make choices. the second. There is probably still a very good living to be earned that way—effective communication remains important; but firms that can help their clients earn the right kind of reputation—by helping to shape policy rather than explain it—will deliver and derive far greater value in the future. A PR PERSON WHO LOOKS AT A CLIENT FROM A TRUE JOURNALISTIC PERSPECTIVE SHOULD BE ABLE TO UNEARTH BOTH POSITIVE NEWS (AUTHENTIC STORIES THAT REINFORCE THE MESSAGES A COMPANY WANTS TO COMMUNICATE ABOUT ITSELF) AND NOT-SO-POSITIVE NEWS (HELPING CLIENTS IDENTIFY AREAS OF REPUTATION RISK). Most PR people could benefit from going back and reading Bernays’ classic The Engineering of Consent. But they should also be reading more recent volumes such as The Tipping Point by Malcolm Gladwell, Nudge by Richard Thaler and Cass Sunstein, Made to Stick by Chip Heath, or Contagious by Jonah Burger. Or listening to neuroscientists like David Eagleman, who presented at our first Global Public Relations Summit in 2012 and provided numerous insights—some of them quite shocking—into the ways emotional responses can overrule the rational mind, and the unconscious supersede the conscious. Understanding the latest thinking in this area is essential for anyone hoping to change attitudes and behaviors. 4. Managing reputation is about more than just communicating reputation There are two necessary preconditions if a company is to have a good reputation (by which we mean a reputation that strengthens the relationship between a company and its key stakeholders, reducing risk and providing greater opportunity). First, it must earn that reputation; then it must communicate what it has done to earn it. The first of those things is by far the most important; traditionally, public relations firms have spent far more time and energy on This requires an understanding of corporate culture, and corporate values, and how to communicate them so that executives communicate them through their words and—infinitely more important—their deeds; employees believe in them and live them; and external stakeholders understand them and believe that they are authentic. 5. Becoming real brand journalists The public relations industry has always recruited former journalists. But historically, it has demanded that they stop acting like journalists. Their perceived value was their ability to craft stories that their former colleagues would find interesting or appealing. But that approach ignored their true value. Real brand journalism is not just about telling good stories, it’s about identifying and researching and developing those stories. By hiring people who think and act like journalists, and encouraging clients to allow these “brand journalists” full access, PR firms can provide tremendous value. A PR person who looks at a client from a true journalistic perspective should be able to unearth both positive news (authentic stories that reinforce the messages a company wants to communicate about itself) and not-sopositive news (helping clients identify areas of reputation risk).
  8. 8. Editorial Feature 6. Being truly channel neutral The ideal of channel neutrality has been on the communications industry agenda for decades. It has (at least theoretically) been at the heart of several approaches to integration—“orchestration,” “the whole egg,” and more. But it has proven incredibly difficult to realize, perhaps because the wrong people have been driving the process. True channel neutrality is difficult for advertising agencies, because the financial rewards of persuading a client to invest in one channel—paid advertising—provide an almost irresistible attraction. Given the choice between telling the client he or she needs a billion dollar ad campaign or a $100,000 PR initiative, most ad firms have found ways to convince themselves—and their clients—that the ad campaign is the best solution. (The new generation of digital firms has a slightly different challenge: by focusing on and recruiting for a single channel of communication, they lack the expertise to be channel agnostic.) But PR is not a channel, or a medium, or a vehicle; it’s a process. There is no reason why PR people should not be just as comfortable suggesting a flashmob as they are recommending a press conference; a mobile app rather than a media release; or even an ad campaign rather than a publicity program. No reason, that is, except that they lack the talent in-house. If a PR firm is staffed entirely with media relations experts, it is going to find channel neutrality just as challenging as any ad agency or digital specialist. 7. Eliminating internal barriers As public relations firms evolved, they traditionally broke their businesses down in a number of different ways: by the intended audience (practice areas such as consumer and corporate, public affairs and investor relations); by industry section (healthcare, technology, financial services); and—in the case of the largest firms—by geography. This made agencies more manageable— and created opportunities for senior staff—but it also erected barriers between the various business units, often creating obstacles to assembling the best people from multiple practices, sectors and geographies. Those barriers have become more problematic as communications challenges have become more complex. And ironically, there are more of those barriers at the largest agencies, which are often called upon the handle the most complex, global issues. Agencies need to ask themselves whether these vestigial structures still make sense. Is the “corporate” audience really so distinct from the “consumer” audience? If so, is a CSR campaign corporate (because a major objective in enhanced reputation) or consumer (because done right, CSR can help drive sales)? Wouldn’t your public affairs efforts be better served if they included an employee communications component, motivating ordinary employees to get involved? And does having a “digital” practice make any more sense than having a “print” practice or a “radio” practice? Or does it perhaps another barrier, one that actually makes it more difficult to come up with channel-neutral solutions? that the agency loses a great client counselor and gains a mediocre (at best) manager. Many firms have been experimenting with alternate career paths that keep their best PR people close to their clients, turning them into “client relationship managers” running complex global accounts, but there is still a perception that the top jobs in most agencies—the ones that earn the most money and the most respect—involve managing a practice or an office. That will need to change, as experts in data analysis, those with a flair for insights and creativity, those comfortable in the C-suite, and those whose expertise involves internal investigative journalism or content creation, demand public relations careers that are as fulfilling and as rewarding as those who are excited by the prospect of managing a P&L— or their own firm. 8. Recruiting differently 10. Make it matter There are people working in public relations firms today who are more than capable of doing many, perhaps all, of the things described so far in this article. There are (contrary to popular perception) PR people who understand and even love hard data; who have studied neuroscience and applied its findings to their work; who counsel their clients’ CEO on his actions as well as his words; who are just as comfortable recommending an ad campaign as a PR program, if it’s the right solution to a client’s problem. But there are not enough of them, and there won’t be enough of them until PR firms change the way they recruit and target a broader, more diverse range of people, taking a risk on hiring candidates not only from journalism and politics and finance, but from marketing and research and academia and a range of other disciplines that may seem completely unrelated to PR as we currently know it. The final challenge, another one the industry has been wrestling with for decades, involves making sure that all of this activity—improved use of data, better insights, application of the latest science, radical restructuring, recruitment and career mapping—pays off in business terms. Fortunately, there is recent research that provides a map for PR measurement. Fred Reicheld’s “net promoter score” approach has focused primarily on demonstrating that when consumers are more likely to advocate for a brand—by recommending it to their friends and peers—there is a real payoff in terms of future performance. (Similarly, when consumers are actively critical of a brand, there is a measurable negative impact on performance.) There is no reason why this methodology cannot be applied to other stakeholder groups, and public relations people should start every new campaign by asking, will this increase the number of advocates and reduce the number of detractors for the company, organization, product or service. And they should measure every campaign by figuring out who the ratio of advocates to detractors changed—and making sure management understands how that ratio is relevant to sales, profits and share price. 9. Creating new career paths Once those people have been recruited, agencies will need to offer them career paths that don’t necessarily look like the traditional trajectory of a successful PR executive. For one thing, that traditional trajectory has never served agencies as well as they might think. It has all too often resulted in promoting a great PR person until he or she is gradually shifted away from client work and into the management of a “P&L”—often with the result www.holmesreport.com 7
  9. 9. CONSULTANCIES OF THE YEAR Consultancy Report Card 2013 Asia Pacific ASIA-PACIFIC CONSULTANCY OF THE YEAR: MSLGROUP A third consecutive year of 30 percent or better organic growth in Asia means that MSLGroup has established itself as a force to be reckoned with in the region. While much of the focus has been on a series of acquisitions (seven in three years; experiential agency Luminous and production and design specialist King Harvests were added to the fold in 2012), much of the underlying growth has come from the increasingly close working relationship between what were once disparate and dispersed operations. There were new multimarket assignments from the likes of P&G, Coca-Cola, IKEA, Sony, Singapore Tourism Board, Haier, TAITRA, WalMart and United Technologies. MSL also picked up new business in local markets, including Facebook (India), McDonald’s (Taiwan), Disney (Taiwan), Microsoft (Japan), Dow Corning (Japan), Beam Global Spirits (Singapore), and Jack & Jones (China). Other major clients include Hyundai, Samsung, Huawei, the Business Software Alliance, World Gold Council, Astra Zeneca, and Dell. MSL now has 1,675 people in Asia, across 38 offices in nine markets, under the leadership of Glenn Osaki—who has led the firm since its early days in Asia—supported by a team that includes China veterans Johan Bjorksten and Par Uhlin (whose firm, Eastwei, was one of the better acquisitions of recent years); Indian leadership team Sunil Gautam and Jaideep Shergill, and VP of insights and innovation Gaurav Mishra.—PH creative insight process that has helped it create standout work for its clients. A good example was the ‘Grazed for Greatness’ campaign for new men’s fashion brand MJ Bale, a smart idea that boosted awareness and ultimately spurred a significant sales increase. The TBWA-owned firm won 14 pitches during the year - now boasting a client base that includes Nissan, Infinity, Energizer, PlayStation, IAG and Reckitt Benckiser - and is eyeing further expansion into Asia after launching in Singapore.—AS FINALISTS: Impact Communications Australia, Liquid Ideas, Ogilvy Public Relations Worldwide, PPR CHINA CONSULTANCY OF THE YEAR: FLEISHMANHILLARD THERE’S no doubt that China is now the major engine for growth for FleishmanHillard in the Asia-Pacific region, with revenues from the mainland up by 45 percent, and the Hong Kong office growing by close to 20 percent. Regional president Li Hong took the helm of the firm’s China operations a decade ago, at which time the firm has just $1 million of business in the market. Focusing on helping overseas multinationals understand the Chinese market—with a more recent expertise helping Chinese businesses expand internationally, the firm has three offices (Beijing, Shanghai and Guangzhou) and two brands (Blue Current opened there in 2011 and is now a $1 million in its own right, serving clients including Chinese giants Gome, Huawei, and Li-Ning and global giants P&G, Philips, Mercedes Benz, Tiffany and Swatch. FINALISTS: BlueFocus, Edelman, Ogilvy Public Relations, Weber Shandwick FINALISTS: BlueFocus, MSLGroup, Ogilvy Public Relations, Weber Shandwick AUSTRALASIA CONSULTANCY OF THE YEAR: INDIA CONSULTANCY OF THE YEAR: ELEVEN PR ELEVEN has established itself as one of the brightest of Australia’s new constellation of consumer PR agencies, coming off a highly successful year that saw it grow revenues and win plenty of recognition. Founded in New Zealand in 2006, Eleven opened an Australian operation in 2011, benefiting from an impressive 8 www.holmesreport.com PERFECT RELATIONS IN India’s highly-competitive PR market, it takes a certain level of performance to remain relevant for more than 20 years. That Perfect Relations has done so speaks volumes about a pioneering sensibility that continues to drive growth at one of India’s biggest PR players. Still proudly independent, Perfect leaders Dilip Cherian and Bobby Kewalramani have
  10. 10. Consultancies of the Year created a vibrant agency culture that with relatively low senior turnover and a laudable commitment to training and development. The past 12 months, meanwhile, saw Perfect win some of India’s biggest PR pitches, for Infosys, Google, Airtel and Nokia. And the agency’s campaign work remains a enduring strength, highlighted by standout work for Coca-Cola and Acer. Now numbering more than 500 employees, Perfect’s success is evidence that good homegrown Indian PR firms need not sell to MNCs to realise their ambitions.—AS FINALISTS: Adfactors, Avian Media, Integral, MSLGroup JAPAN CONSULTANCY OF THE YEAR: BILCOM FOUNDED in 2003, digital marketing specialist Bilcom is a Japanese firm with a distinctly modern approach, offering a cohesive blend of marketing and PR services that range from planning to execution. The firm’s communications unit was launched in 2006 by company director Koji Nizaka, catching the eye when it won a Gold Lion at the inaugural Cannes PR Lions in 2009. Despite tough economic conditions, the firm’s innovative mindset has ensured resilient earnings, boosted by new business from Tommy Hilfiger and Lacoste, along with a smart YouTube campaign that has helped to personalise Konica Minolta’s corporate image.—AS Leading the Change FINALISTS: Dentsu Public Relations, FleishmanHillard, PRAP, Weber Shandwick KOREA CONSULTANCY OF THE YEAR: MEDICOM ONE of the most digitally-savvy PR firms in one of the most digitally-savvy PR markets in the region, Korea’s Medicom’s capabilities in the digital and social space were the key factor in sealing a 2012 deal to represent global public relations giant Burson-Marsteller in the Korean market. It now provides integrated digital and traditional services to more than half of its clients, including big names such as LG Electronics, MSLGROUP Awarded Asia Pacific Consultancy of the Year facebook.com/MSLGROUPAsia twitter.com/MSLGROUPAsia www.holmesreport.com 9
  11. 11. Consultancy Report Card 2013 Asia Pacific Shiseido, Nike, and Kiehl’s, served by about 140 account staff, and last year saw the introduction of big data and social intelligence services for clients such as Accenture and BMW. That helped the firm to healthy doubledigit growth in 2012, with new business from IBM, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs & Trade, LG, Nongshim, the Australian Trade Commission, and the US Embassy.—PH FINALISTS: Communication Korea, Edelman, KPR, Prain SOUTH-EAST ASIA CONSULTANCY OF THE YEAR: OGILVY PUBLIC RELATIONS WORLDWIDE OGILVY’S massive, market-leading operations in China and Australia get the lion’s share of the attention, but it has long had a significant presence in South-East Asia, and in 2012 its operations there led the way in terms of growth, with the Indonesian and Malaysian operations up by about 25 percent each and its Philippines office up by better than 36 percent. The Singapore office, meanwhile, was named PR Agency of the Year by Marketing Magazine for the third consecutive year, while the Vietnamese office (Ogilvy was a pioneer when the market began to open itself up for business a few years ago) also made a solid contribution. New business came from the Indonesian Port Corporation, Zurich Insurance, World Kitchen, Panasonic, Singapore Tourism Board, APB Guinness and more. FINALISTS: Edelman, Fortune PR, Galaxy Communications, Vero PR NEW CONSULTANCY OF THE YEAR: ARTEMIS ARTEMIS Associates, founded in March 2011 by FTI veteran Diana Footitt, has quickly carved a niche for itself as an entrepreneurial boutique firm capable of delivering worldclass, international, independent strategic communications advice and flawless execution to an impressive list of clients: Berry Brothers & Rudd, CVC/Matahari Department Stores, Esprit, Estee Lauder, Fong’s Industries, Graff Diamonds, Hong Kong Airlines, IRC 10 www.holmesreport.com Limited, Louis XIII Holdings, Poly Property Group, the Mongolian government, and Samsonite. The firm made an immediate impact on the M&A front with its work on the Prada and Graff Diamonds transactions, with other highlights including work with the Government of Mongolia on the media relations surrounding its inaugural US$1.5b medium term note offering and advice to CVC on media relations for an offering involving Matahari, the Indonesian retailer.—PH FINALISTS: PRecious, SharpeLankester, Zeno CONSUMER CONSULTANCY OF THE YEAR: WAGGENER EDSTROM IT was no great surprise that Waggener Edstrom picked up three trophies at the 2012 SABRE Awards dinner in Hong Kong: it was a good haul for a midsize firm, but WaggEd has been doing good work in Asia since its acquisition of local technology specialist Shout in 2005. What was, perhaps, surprising is that the three winning campaigns were for an antismoking health education program on behalf of the Health Promotion Board of Singapore; a product media relations effort for the Ramen Emporium, with Japanese noodle restaurant IPPUDO in Hong Kong; and a promotional campaign for online travel company Zuji. In other words, there wasn’t a single technology assignment—long WaggEd’s bread-and-butter, among its winning work. That’s a testament to the success the Asia-Pacific operation has had in diversifying beyond the tech sector so that there is now a case to be made that after a year of better than 60 percent growth, the consumer practice is now its Astrongest in the region.—PH considerably in 2012, introducing a change communication practice, expanding its investor relations offer with the addition of former stockbroker Harold Shapiro, and opening a new office in Brisbane after picking up business from local clients such as Chandler Macleod, St.George Bank, Vita Group and BDO. High-profile work included change communication assignments:  first, the transformation of the OPSM brand, which won multiple awards; and second, the successful integration of leading accounting firms BDO and PKF during a period of intense competition and consolidation of professional service firms in Australia. Both showcased Sefiani’s ability to operate in the C-suite, counseling clients at the highest level and deliver real business results.—PH FINALISTS: FleishmanHillard, Pelham Bell Pottinger, Senate SHJ, Weber Shandwick DIGITAL CONSULTANCY OF THE YEAR: WEBER SHANDWICK A few years ago, you would have been hardpressed to even include Weber Shandwick in this category, but the firm has transformed its digital operation to good effect. That is in large part down to the development of an impressive digital studio led by Jon Wade, which has shown a commendable commitment to cutting-edge content creation on behalf of both clients and the firm itself. This has translated into significant digital growth for a range of existing clients, along with helping it net new clients such as the California Walnut Commission in China. Weber Shandwick may have been a little late to the digital party in Asia, but they are making up for lost time in a hurry.—AS FINALISTS: AKA Asia, Mango, Ogilvy Public Relations, Trimaran FINALISTS: Bilcom, Edelman, MSLGroup, Ogilvy Public Relations Worldwide CORPORATE AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS CONSULTANCY OF THE YEARS: FINANCIAL CONSULTANCY OF THE YEAR: SEFIANI LONG established as one of Australia’s leading corporate communications boutique, Sefiani broadened the scope of its operations ADFACTORS FOUNDER and chief executive Madan Bahal’s investments during difficult economic conditions are paying off, helping Adfactors— still India’s largest corporate and financial
  12. 12. Consultancies of the Year communications specialist—grow by around 20 percent in 2012. The firm continues to derive a large part of its revenues from the financial realm, thanks to extensive experience in mergers and acquisitions, IPOs and restructurings. Major clients include some of India’s largest companies and overseas multinationals, most notably in the financial services sector: State Bank of India, ICICI Group, Larsen & Toubro, Jet Airways, Maruti Suzuki, Barclays Banking Group, Unit Trust of India, Aviva Life Insurance, Nissan Motor Company, Adani Group, JSW Group and GMR Group. Additions in 2012 included Vodafone, Citibank, Bank of America Merrill Lynch, Essar Group, Mahindra Group, and more.—AS/PH FINALISTS: Artemis, Brunswick, Ogilvy Public Relations, Strategic Public Relations Group TECHNOLOGY CONSULTANCY OF THE YEAR: BITE COMMUNICATIONS THE firm formerly known as Upstream may have dramatically reshaped its offering since being acquired by Bite, yet much of its success must be down to the reassuring management stability provided by David Ketchum and Paul Mottram. The duo are now supported by a solid Asia-Pacific management team, all of whom have played a role in ushering an innovative rollout of new services at the agency. The 2012 acquisition of search firm Red Bricks Media followed two earlier digital buys, turning Bite into a firm that is as comfortable handling digital marketing as it is running media relations activity. Bite grew its Asia-Pacific revenue by almost 15 percent in 2012 to US$8m, providing ample evidence that its strategy is bearing fruit, and all accomplished without a noticeable pipeline of global business for the US or Europe. For technology clients, Bite’s integrated marketing capabilities give it a clear edge, and the firm’s expansion into the broader B2B and consumer market suggests that neither Ketchum nor Mottram are about to slow down anytime soon.—AS FINALISTS: Hoffman Agency, Lewis PR, Rice Communications, Six Degrees   HALF PAGE HORIZONTAL w/bleed: 8.5 x 5.5 inches
  13. 13. FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS Consultancy Report Card 2013 Asia Pacific HOW WERE FIRMS SELECTED FOR INCLUSION IN THE CONSUL TANCY REPORT CARD? THERE are several criteria for inclusion.One is size. We made every effort to include the largest pan-regional agencies as well as the leaders in individual markets. Awards were another indicator of quality, and we included many firms that had won awards in their local markets or in international competition, such as the International Public Relations Association’s Golden World Awards. Finally, we gave special consideration to members of the various international networks of independent public relations consultancies, on the grounds that these firms are particularly focused on the kinds of international clients to whom this Report Card is distributed. Of course, we were dependent on the participation of the firms themselves. We contacted more than 150 firms to invite them to submit the detailed information we needed in order to create a thorough and accurate profile. Many of them failed to respond and several declined to participate. DO YOU EVER WRITE NEGATIVE REVIEWS OF THE FIRMS YOU INCLUDE? NOT usually. Firms are included because we believe they are good enough to recommend to our client-side readers. If we don’t think a firm is good enough to be included, we exclude it, rather than wasting our valuable space and our readers’ valuable time with a negative review. HOW DID YOU SELECT YOUR CONSULTANCIES OF THE YEAR? WE met with more than 80 of the firms included in this Report Card personally, sitting through credentials presentations and discussions about philosophy, culture, values, and strategy. In addition to those meetings we spoke with more than 100 clients and industry experts. In almost every case, we asked the individuals which firms they most respected. We also took into consideration growth and industry recognition such as awards, which provide us with a unique insight into the way participating consultancies think. Both historic positioning in a market— consistent leadership over time—and more recent accomplishments and performance were taken into consideration. HOW CAN MY FIRM PARTICIPATE IN NEXT YEAR’S CONSULTANCY REPORT CARD? SIMPLY contact our editor, Paul Holmes at pholmes@holmesreport.com. Be prepared to answer questions about your firm ranging from the general (what makes your firm different from its competitors) to the specific (recent new business successes, awards and recognition earned) and to include client references or testimonials. We will start pulling together information for the 2014 Report Card beginning in October of this year. IS THERE ANY COST FOR INCLUSION? ABSOLUTELY not. Because the Report Card reaches an extensive client-side readership—both in the U.S. and globally—several participating firms have chosen to advertise, but firms are included on merit, not because they have bought ads, and we would never exclude a firm that didn’t advertise. 12 www.holmesreport.com
  14. 14. Alphabetical Index A M R APCO Worldwide ....................................... 22 Adfactors PR .............................................. 44 AKA Asia .................................................... 44 Artmeis Associates ..................................... 46 Asahi Agency ............................................. 46 Ate Integrated Communications ................. 47 Avian Media ................................................ 47 MSLGroup .................................................. 36 Mango ........................................................ 64 Maverick ..................................................... 65 Medicom .................................................... 65 Mileage Communications ........................... 66 Rice Communications ................................. 72 Rowland .................................................... 73 Ruder Finn .................................................. 40 Ryan Financial Communications ................. 73 B n2n communications .................................. 66 Bilcom ........................................................ 48 Bite ............................................................. 48 BlueFocus Integrated Marketing Consulting . 9 4 Brunswick .................................................. 50 Burson-Marsteller ....................................... 20 124 Communications ................................. 67 Ogilvy PR Worldwide .................................. 38 C N O P DEC Communications ................................ 54 Dentsu Public Relations .............................. 54 PPR ............................................................ 67 PR One ...................................................... 67 PR Pundit ................................................... 68 PRAP ......................................................... 68 PRHub ....................................................... 69 Palin Communications ................................ 69 Pelham Bell Pottinger ................................. 70 Perfect Relations ........................................ 70 Porda Havas ............................................... 71 Porter Novelli .............................................. 38 The PRactice .............................................. 71 Prain .......................................................... 72 PRecious Communications ......................... 72 E Q EMG ........................................................... 55 Edelman ..................................................... 24 Eleven PR ................................................... 56 Eon ............................................................ 56 Qyvision ...................................................... 72 Cannings Corporate Communications ........ 50 Cognito Communications Counsellors ....... 51 Cohn & Wolfe ............................................. 51 Communications Korea .............................. 51 Comniscient Group ..................................... 52 Cosmo ....................................................... 52 Creative Crest ............................................. 53 D S Sefiani ........................................................ 74 SenateSHJ Group ...................................... 74 SharpeLankester ........................................ 75 Six Degrees ................................................ 75 Strategic Public Relations Group ................ 76 T Text 100 ..................................................... 76 Trimaran PR Asia......................................... 77 V Vector Group .............................................. 77 Vero Public Relations .................................. 78 W Waggener Edstrom ..................................... 78 Weber Shandwick ...................................... 42 Wonderful Sky Financial Group ................... 79 Wrights PR ................................................. 79 Z Zeno Group ................................................ 79 Zing ............................................................ 80 F FTI Consulting ............................................ 57 Fleishman-Hillard ........................................ 26 Fortune PR ................................................. 57 Frank PR .................................................... 58 G Galaxy Communications ............................. 58 GolinHarris .................................................. 28 Grayling ...................................................... 59 Grebstad Hicks Communications ............... 59 H Hamilton Advisors ....................................... 59 Havas PR Agatep ....................................... 60 Hill + Knowlton Strategies............................ 30 The Hoffman Agency .................................. 60 Huntington Communications ...................... 61 I INR ............................................................. 61 Impact Communications Australia .............. 61 In.Fom ........................................................ 62 Integral PR .................................................. 62 K KPR & Associates ....................................... 63 Ketchum ..................................................... 34 Kreab Gavin Anderson ................................ 63 Kyodo Public Relations ............................... 64 L Liquid Ideas ................................................ 64 www.holmesreport.com 13
  15. 15. Consultancy Report Card 2013 Asia Pacific GEOGRAPHICAL INDEX AUSTRALIA Bite ............................................................. 48 Burson-Marsteller ....................................... 20 Cannings Corporate Communications ........ 50 DEC Communications ................................ 54 Edelman ..................................................... 24 Eleven PR ................................................... 55 FTI Consulting ............................................ 57 Fleishman-Hillard ........................................ 26 Frank PR .................................................... 58 Hill & Knowlton Strategies............................ 30 Impact Communications Australia .............. 61 Kreab Gavin Anderson ................................ 63 Liquid Ideas ................................................ 64 Mango ........................................................ 64 n2n communications .................................. 66 Ogilvy PR Worldwide .................................. 36 PPR ............................................................ 67 Palin Communications ................................ 69 Porter Novelli .............................................. 38 Rowland .................................................... 73 Sefiani ........................................................ 74 SenateSHJ Group ...................................... 74 Text 100 ..................................................... 76 Waggener Edstrom ..................................... 78 Weber Shandwick ...................................... 42 Wrights PR ................................................. 79 Zing ............................................................ 80 CAMBODIA Vero Public Relations .................................. 78 CHINA APCO Worldwide ....................................... 18 Bite ............................................................. 48 BlueFocus Integrated Marketing Consulting . 9 4 Brunswick .................................................. 49 Burson-Marsteller ....................................... 20 Cohn & Wolfe ............................................. 51 Dentsu Public Relations .............................. 54 EMG ........................................................... 55 Edelman ..................................................... 24 FTI Consulting ............................................ 57 Fleishman-Hillard ........................................ 26 GolinHarris .................................................. 28 Grayling ...................................................... 59 Grebstad Hicks Communications ............... 59 Hill & Knowlton Strategies............................ 30 The Hoffman Agency .................................. 60 Ketchum ..................................................... 32 Kreab Gavin Anderson ................................ 63 MSLGroup .................................................. 34 Mileage Communications ........................... 66 Ogilvy PR Worldwide .................................. 36 PRAP ......................................................... 68 Porda Havas ............................................... 71 Porter Novelli .............................................. 38 Ruder Finn .................................................. 40 Strategic Public Relations Group ................ 76 Text 100 ..................................................... 76 Trimaran PR Asia......................................... 77 Waggener Edstrom ..................................... 78 Weber Shandwick ...................................... 42 HONG KONG APCO Worldwide ....................................... 18 Artmeis Associates ..................................... 46 Bite ............................................................. 48 14 www.holmesreport.com Brunswick .................................................. 49 Burson-Marsteller ....................................... 20 Cohn & Wolfe ............................................. 51 Edelman ..................................................... 24 FTI Consulting ............................................ 57 Fleishman-Hillard ........................................ 26 GolinHarris .................................................. 28 Grayling ...................................................... 59 Grebstad Hicks Communications ............... 59 Hamilton Advisors ....................................... 59 Hill & Knowlton Strategies............................ 30 The Hoffman Agency .................................. 60 Ketchum ..................................................... 32 Kreab Gavin Anderson ................................ 63 MSLGroup .................................................. 34 Porda Havas ............................................... 71 Ogilvy PR Worldwide .................................. 36 Ruder Finn .................................................. 40 Ryan Financial Communications ................. 73 SharpeLankester ........................................ 75 Strategic Public Relations Group ................ 76 Text 100 ..................................................... 76 Trimaran PR Asia......................................... 77 Waggener Edstrom ..................................... 78 Weber Shandwick ...................................... 42 Wonderful Sky Financial Group ................... 79 INDIA APCO Worldwide ....................................... 18 Adfactors PR .............................................. 44 Avian Media ................................................ 47 Bite ............................................................. 48 Burson-Marsteller ....................................... 20 Comniscient Group ..................................... 52 Creative Crest ............................................. 53 Edelman ..................................................... 24 Fleishman-Hillard ........................................ 26 Integral PR .................................................. 62 MSLGroup .................................................. 34 Mileage Communications ........................... 66 Ogilvy PR Worldwide .................................. 36 PR Pundit ................................................... 68 PRHub ....................................................... 69 Perfect Relations ........................................ 70 Porter Novelli .............................................. 38 The PRactice .............................................. 71 Six Degrees ................................................ 75 Text 100 ..................................................... 76 Waggener Edstrom ..................................... 78 Weber Shandwick ...................................... 42 Zeno Group ................................................ 79 INDONESIA APCO Worldwide ....................................... 18 Burson-Marsteller ....................................... 20 Cognito Communications Counsellors ....... 50 Cohn & Wolfe ............................................. 51 Edelman ..................................................... 24 Fortune PR ................................................. 57 Maverick ..................................................... 65 Mileage Communications ........................... 66 Ogilvy PR Worldwide .................................. 36 Porter Novelli .............................................. 38 Qyvision ...................................................... 72 Weber Shandwick ...................................... 42 Zeno Group ................................................ 79 JAPAN Asahi Agency ............................................. 46 Bilcom ........................................................ 48 Cosmo ....................................................... 52 Dentsu Public Relations .............................. 54 Edelman ..................................................... 24 Fleishman-Hillard ........................................ 26 GolinHarris .................................................. 28 Hill & Knowlton Strategies............................ 30 The Hoffman Agency .................................. 60 Kreab Gavin Anderson ................................ 63 Kyodo Public Relations ............................... 64 MSLGroup .................................................. 34 Ogilvy PR Worldwide .................................. 36 PRAP ......................................................... 68 Porter Novelli .............................................. 38 Text 100 ..................................................... 76 Vector Group .............................................. 77 Weber Shandwick ...................................... 42 Zeno Group ................................................ 79 KOREA Burson-Marsteller ....................................... 20 Communications Korea .............................. 51 Edelman ..................................................... 24 Fleishman-Hillard ........................................ 26 Hill & Knowlton Strategies............................ 30 The Hoffman Agency .................................. 60 INR ............................................................. 61 KPR & Associates ....................................... 63 MSLGroup .................................................. 34 Medicom .................................................... 65 Ogilvy PR Worldwide .................................. 36 PR One ...................................................... 67 Porter Novelli .............................................. 38 Prain .......................................................... 72 Waggener Edstrom ..................................... 78 MACAU Trimaran PR Asia......................................... 77 MALAYSIA APCO Worldwide ....................................... 18 Cohn & Wolfe ............................................. 51 Edelman ..................................................... 24 Fleishman-Hillard ........................................ 26 Hill & Knowlton Strategies............................ 30 In.Fom ........................................................ 62 MSLGroup .................................................. 34 Mileage Communications ........................... 66 Ogilvy PR Worldwide .................................. 36 Strategic Public Relations Group ................ 76 Text 100 ..................................................... 76 Weber Shandwick ...................................... 42 MYANMAR SharpeLankester ........................................ 75 Vero Public Relations .................................. 78 NEW ZEALAND Eleven PR ................................................... 56 Mango ........................................................ 64 Ogilvy PR Worldwide .................................. 36 PPR ............................................................ 67 Porter Novelli .............................................. 38 SenateSHJ Group ...................................... 74
  16. 16. Geographical Index PHILIPPINES Creative Crest ............................................. 53 Eon ............................................................ 56 Fleishman-Hillard ........................................ 26 Havas PR Agatep ....................................... 60 Ogilvy PR Worldwide .................................. 36 Weber Shandwick ...................................... 42 SINGAPORE APCO Worldwide ....................................... 18 Adfactors PR .............................................. 44 AKA Asia .................................................... 44 Ate Integrated Communications ................. 47 Bite ............................................................. 48 Burson-Marsteller ....................................... 20 Cohn & Wolfe ............................................. 51 EMG ........................................................... 55 Edelman ..................................................... 24 Eleven PR ................................................... 56 FTI Consulting ............................................ 57 Fleishman-Hillard ........................................ 26 Fortune PR ................................................. 57 GolinHarris .................................................. 28 Grayling ...................................................... 59 Grebstad Hicks Communications ............... 59 Hill & Knowlton Strategies............................ 30 The Hoffman Agency .................................. 60 Huntington Communications ...................... 61 In.Fom ........................................................ 62 Kreab Gavin Anderson ................................ 63 MSLGroup .................................................. 34 Mileage Communications ........................... 66 Ogilvy PR Worldwide .................................. 36 Pelham Bell Pottinger ................................. 70 Porter Novelli .............................................. 38 PRecious Communications ......................... 72 Rice Communications ................................. 72 Ruder Finn .................................................. 40 Ryan Financial Communications ................. 73 SharpeLankester ........................................ 75 Strategic Public Relations Group ................ 76 Text 100 ..................................................... 76 Waggener Edstrom ..................................... 78 Weber Shandwick ...................................... 42 Zeno Group ................................................ 79 SRI LANKA Ogilvy PR Worldwide .................................. 36 TAIPEI Bite ............................................................. 48 TAIWAN Edelman ..................................................... 24 GolinHarris .................................................. 28 Ketchum ..................................................... 32 Ogilvy PR Worldwide .................................. 36 Porter Novelli .............................................. 38 Strategic Public Relations Group ................ 76 Weber Shandwick ...................................... 42 THAILAND APCO Worldwide ....................................... 18 Hill & Knowlton Strategies............................ 30 Grayling ...................................................... 59 Grebstad Hicks Communications ............... 59 Mileage Communications ........................... 66 124 Communications ................................. 67 Ogilvy PR Worldwide .................................. 36 Vero Public Relations .................................. 78 Weber Shandwick ...................................... 42 VIETNAM APCO Worldwide ....................................... 18 Galaxy Communications ............................. 58 Mileage Communications ........................... 66 Ogilvy PR Worldwide .................................. 36 Vero Public Relations .................................. 78 Zeno Group ................................................ 79
  17. 17. Consultancy Report Card 2013 Asia Pacific SPECIALTY INDEX BOUTIQUE In.Fom ........................................................ 62 SharpeLankester ........................................ 75 BUSINESS-TO-BUSINESS. APCO Worldwide .......................................18 EMG ........................................................... 55 CONSUMER MARKETING. AKA Asia .................................................... 44 Cohn & Wolfe ............................................. 51 DEC Communications ................................ 54 Eleven PR ................................................... 56 Edelman .....................................................24 Frank PR .................................................... 58 Galaxy Communications ............................. 58 GolinHarris ..................................................28 Grebstad Hicks Communications ............... 59 Impact Communications Australia .............. 61 Liquid Ideas ................................................ 64 MSLGroup...................................................34 Ogilvy Public Relations Worldwide...............36 PR Pundit ................................................... 68 The PRactice .............................................. 71 Porter Novelli ..............................................38 Weber Shandwick ......................................42 Qyvision ...................................................... 72 Trimaran PR Asia......................................... 77 Zeno Group ................................................ 79 Zing ............................................................ 80 CORPORATE COMMUNICATIONS APCO Worldwide .......................................18 AKA Asia .................................................... 44 Artmeis Associates ..................................... 46 Burson-Marsteller .......................................20 Cannings Corporate Communications ........ 50 Communications Korea .............................. 51 DEC Communications ................................ 54 Eon ............................................................ 56 FTI Consulting ............................................ 57 Fleishman-Hillard ........................................26 GolinHarris ..................................................28 Hamilton Advisors ....................................... 59 Havas PR Agatep ....................................... 60 Hill + Knowlton Strategies............................30 Impact Communications Australia .............. 61 Kreab Gavin Anderson ................................ 63 MSLGroup ..................................................34 Mileage Communications ........................... 66 Ogilvy Public Relations Worldwide ..............36 Pelham Bell Pottinger ................................. 70 Porter Novelli ..............................................38 PRecious Communications ......................... 72 Qyvision ...................................................... 72 Rowland .................................................... 73 16 www.holmesreport.com Sefiani ........................................................ 74 SenateSHJ Group ...................................... 74 SharpeLankester ........................................ 75 Six Degrees ................................................ 75 Trimaran PR Asia......................................... 77 Vero Public Relations .................................. 78 Zing ............................................................ 80 CRISIS MANAGEMENT APCO Worldwide .......................................18 Burson-Marsteller .......................................20 Communications Korea .............................. 51 Galaxy Communications ............................. 58 Hill + Knowlton Strategies............................30 Ketchum......................................................32 SenateSHJ Group ...................................... 74 CSR Qyvision ...................................................... 72 DIGITAL Bilcom ........................................................ 48 DEC Communications ................................ 54 Eon ............................................................ 56 Mango ........................................................ 64 Medicom .................................................... 65 EMPLOYEE COMMUNICATIONS AKA Asia .................................................... 44 Fleishman-Hillard ........................................26 GolinHarris ..................................................28 ENTERTAINMENT The PRactice .............................................. 71 EXPERIENTIAL Eleven PR ................................................... 56 Mango ........................................................ 64 FINANCIAL SERVICES Artmeis Associates ..................................... 46 Brunswick .................................................. 50 Cannings Corporate Communications ........ 50 FTI Consulting ............................................ 57 Hamilton Advisors ....................................... 59 Kreab Gavin Anderson ................................ 63 Pelham Bell Pottinger ................................. 70 Porda Havas ............................................... 71 Ryan Financial Communications ................. 73 Sefiani ........................................................ 74 Strategic Public Relations Group ................ 76 Wonderful Sky Financial Group ................... 79 FULL SERVICE Adfactors PR .............................................. 44 Avian Media ................................................ 47 Bite ............................................................. 48 BlueFocus Integrated Marketing Consulting . 9 4 Comniscient Group ..................................... 52 Cosmo ....................................................... 52 Dentsu Public Relations .............................. 54 Fortune PR ................................................. 57 Galaxy Communications ............................. 58 Grayling ...................................................... 59 Huntington Communications ...................... 61 INR ............................................................. 61 Integral PR .................................................. 62 KPR & Associates ....................................... 63 Mileage Communications ........................... 66 124 Communications ................................. 67 PPR ............................................................ 67 PR One ...................................................... 67 PRAP ......................................................... 68 Perfect Relations ........................................ 70 Prain .......................................................... 72 Rice Communications ................................. 72 Strategic Public Relations Group ................ 76 Waggener Edstrom ..................................... 78 Wrights PR ................................................. 79 HEALTHCARE Cosmo ....................................................... 52 Palin Communications ................................ 69 INTEGRATED MARKETING Ate Integrated Communications ................. 47 Fortune PR ................................................. 57 Mango ........................................................ 64 Medicom .................................................... 65 INVESTOR RELATIONS Fleishman-Hillard ........................................26 LIFESTYLE Bilcom ........................................................ 48 LUXURY Trimaran PR Asia......................................... 77 MARKETING Asahi Agency ............................................. 46 Communications Korea .............................. 51 Mango ........................................................ 64 Medicom .................................................... 65 Vector Group .............................................. 77 FOOD MEDIA RELATIONS Ate Integrated Communications ................. 47 APCO Worldwide .......................................18 EMG ........................................................... 55
  18. 18. Specialty Index MULTISPECIALIST NON PROFIT TECHNOLOGY APCO Worldwide .......................................18 Adfactors PR .............................................. 44 Burson-Marsteller .......................................20 Cognito Communications Counsellors ....... 51 Creative Crest ............................................. 53 Edelman .....................................................24 Fleishman-Hillard ........................................26 GolinHarris ..................................................28 Havas PR Agatep ....................................... 60 Hill + Knowlton Strategies............................30 Ketchum......................................................32 Kyodo Public Relations ............................... 64 MSLGroup ..................................................34 n2n communications .................................. 66 Ogilvy Public Relations Worldwide ..............36 Porter Novelli ..............................................38 Ruder Finn ..................................................40 Weber Shandwick ......................................42 Zeno Group ................................................ 79 Palin Communications ................................ 69 Burson-Marsteller .......................................20 Edelman .....................................................24 Fleishman-Hillard ........................................26 The Hoffman Agency .................................. 60 MSLGroup ..................................................34 n2n communications .................................. 66 Ogilvy Public Relations Worldwide ..............36 PRHub ....................................................... 69 The PRactice .............................................. 71 Porter Novelli ..............................................38 Six Degrees ................................................ 75 Text 100 ..................................................... 76 Waggener Edstrom ..................................... 78 Weber Shandwick ......................................42 PUBLIC AFFAIRS AND ISSUES MANAGEMENT APCO Worldwide .......................................18 Burson-Marsteller .......................................20 Eon ............................................................ 56 Fleishman-Hillard ........................................26 Galaxy Communications ............................. 58 GolinHarris ..................................................28 Ketchum......................................................32 Kreab Gavin Anderson ................................ 63 Maverick ..................................................... 65 Porter Novelli ..............................................38 Sefiani ........................................................ 74 SharpeLankester ........................................ 75 Weber Shandwick ......................................42 SOCIAL MEDIA TRAVEL AND TOURISM..... GolinHarris ..................................................28 Grebstad Hicks Communications ............... 59 Impact Communications Australia .............. 61 NEW MEDIA Maverick ..................................................... 65 SPORTS MARKETING Hill + Knowlton Strategies............................30 DESIGN ART SPORTS PROPERTY People And Worlds Connecting Together TRIMARAN PR ASIA HONG KONG Ι BEIJING Ι SHANGHAI Ι www.trimaran.com.hk MACAU HOTEL WINE FINANCIAL MICE
  19. 19. Consultancy Report Card 2013 Asia Pacific APCO WORLDWIDE CHINA H HONG KONG H INDIA H INDONESIA H MALAYSIA H SINGAPORE H THAILAND H VIETNAM its acquisition by APCO a year ago) under Raj Kamble. INTERNATIONAL REACH Brad Staples MOMENTUM About $11.3 million of APCO’s $120 million worldwide fee income derives from its Asia-Pacific operations, with the strongest growth last year coming in South-East Asia. Key clients in the region include Corning, Diageo, Dow Corning, Huawei, Johnson & Johnson, MasterCard, pharmaceutical trade body PhRMA, and Walt Disney, while new business successes in 2012 included international assignments from Indian wind power company Suzlon, and Chinese printing company Toppan, which retained APCO to help it expand its business into the US. REGIONAL REACH About 100 of APCO’s 150 or so people in Asia are based in the firm’s four Greater China offices: Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou and Hong Kong. There are another 30 in South-East Asia, most of them in Singapore but a scattering in Bangkok, Hanoi, Ho Chi Minh City, Jakarta, and a much-reduced Kuala Lumpur office. The Indian operations—the firm is now in New Delhi and Mumbai—are growing at a very healthy rate, strengthened in 2012 with the opening of a new Strawberry Frog office in India (the creative firm’s first office outside the US and first expansion since 18 www.holmesreport.com that turn into “movements”) to India, its first international market. TALENT Last year in North America was about change rather than growth. APCO formed new alliances (with former secretary of state Condoleezza Rice’s emerging marketing consulting business RiceHadley Group), launched new practices (focused on health and wellness and high-stakes events and transactions such as litigation and mergers and acquisitions), opened new offices (primarily in the Middle East) and bought new capabilities (through the acquisition of creative hot-shop Strawberry Frog). APCO is still somewhat smaller across the EMEA region than most of its multinational peers, deriving only about a quarter of its global revenues from its European operations. Its largest EMEA office in London, with a team of more than 50, and has evolved beyond public affairs to include a broad range of corporate reputation work while maintaining the firm’s C-suite focus. The Brussels office, meanwhile, remains focused on EU policy work. But the most impressive growth has come in the Middle East, where APCO acquired local consultancy Ji-Win two years ago. Brad Staples, who built APCO’s European operations over more than a decade, was named president, international, and chair of global development last year and now has responsibility for the Asia-Pacific region, where his leadership team includes Singapore-based Garry Walsh, managing director of South-East Asia; former Wall Street Journal reporter and “One Billion Customers” author James McGregor, chairman of Greater China; and managing director of the Indian operations Sukanti Ghosh. New additions included Ashley Knapp, formerly of Grayling, as director in the Singapore office; Frances Sun, from Hill+Knowlton, as managing director in Shanghai; and Raj Kamble, who is leading the Strawberry Frog operation in India. EXPERTISE APCO has been building out capabilities beyond its core public affairs expertise (still central to the firm’s offer in Beijing) for several years, and all six global practices— healthcare, financial communications, food and consumer products, energy and clean technology, insight, and the Studio Online digital division—are represented in the Asia-Pacific operations, although the focus is still very much on high-end corporate reputation, crisis and issues management, and corporate responsibility work. The firm also expanded its Strawberry Frog operation (a US ad agency, specializing in campaigns CULTURE Last year saw the introduction of The APCO Experience, a new employee proposition designed to provide all employees with individually tailored learning and career development opportunities through challenging and varied work and enhanced recognition, engagement and training. One significant statistic: an impressive 5 percent of APCO’s people were seconded to other offices in 2012, including transfers to Ulaanbaatar, Beijing, Shanghia, New Delhi and Mumbai. The firm also continues to expand its community service initiatives, as a member of the UN Global Compact and a partner of the Clinton Global Initiative, and pro bono agency for Yunus Social Business, founded by Nobel Prize winner Mohammad Yunnus.
  20. 20. National multi-office multi-specialty firms INTELLECTUAL LEADERSHIP The firm’s Champion Brands survey has helped to define a role for APCO—and others—in the corporate reputation arena, uncovering rising expectations and increased scrutiny when it comes to corporate conduct, as well as widespread agreement that companies have the ability to help form a economic development campaign, a SABRE award winner in years past, expanded in 2012, attracting more than $500 million in inbound investment contracts during the most recent summit. And the firm’s support for Rio Tinto’s giant Oyu Tolgoi copper mine in Mongolia—including issues management and community outreach, as well as significant digital work—also continued in 2012. THERE ARE ENOUGH CLIENTS WHO RECOGNIZE THE VALUE OF INVESTING IN THE KIND OF SERVICES THAT APCO OFFERS—FROM TRADITIONAL PUBLIC AFFAIRS AND CRISIS AND ISSUES WORK TO NEWER CONCEPTS SUCH AS PUBLIC DIPLOMACY AND CHAMPION BRAND-BUILDING—FOR THE FIRM TO CONTINUE ITS GROWTH IN THE REGION. better society, and that the best companies are advocates for their customers and other stakeholders. The survey sample included citizens in China, Hong Kong, India, Japan and Australia. The firm has also developed a new approach to crisis and risk management, with a predictive model designed to anticipate potential issues and protect reputation, and a new evaluation tool, which measures “return on reputation” in terms of consumer behaviour, financial value and more. PROGRAMS Some of APCO’s most interesting global assignments have their origins in Asia. The firm’s’s work on the Vibrant Gujarat THE FUTURE Sheer size has never been a priority for APCO, which continues to differentiate itself from other multinationals by its focus on the high-end strategic consulting segment of the business. There is probably still less demand for that kind of work in Asia, where some markets continue to view PR as a commodity. But there are enough clients who recognize the value of investing in the kind of services that APCO offers—from traditional public affairs and crisis and issues work to newer concepts such as public diplomacy and champion brand-building—for the firm to continue its growth in the region. BRAND APCO continues to do what it has always done—producing strong thought leadership papers and commentary on business and political issues, partnering on high-profile regional events, but has also raised its social media profile considerably, from new HealthScope blog to extended length video on YouTube to longer-form articles on digital documents site Scribd. Another major visibility-raising initiative in 2012 saw the firm providing media support and other services to Yunus Social Business, a global change agent founded by micro finance pioneer and Congressional Gold Medal winner Mohammad Yunus. www.holmesreport.com 19
  21. 21. Consultancy Report Card 2013 Asia Pacific BURSON-MARSTELLER HONG KONG H AUSTRALIA H CHINA H INDIA H INDONESIA H KOREA H SINGAPORE Pat Ford MOMENTUM After a strong 2011, progress in the AsiaPacific region stalled somewhat in 2012, As Burson-Marsteller underwent another leadership change. There was plenty of new business nevertheless, a mix of local companies and western multinationals: Ashoka University, Cranberry Marketing Committee, Haier, Hilton Worldwide, HSBC, IndoFood, L’Oreal India, Skype, VIPshop.com, Visa, Yuexei Property, and Chinese technology companies Tencent and WeShop. The firm also enjoyed significant growth with key accounts such as Coca-Cola, Ford, Johnson & Johnson, Microsoft and Qualcomm, and saw a number of Asia-based clients—Huawei, Sony, Haier and Tencent among them—going global. REGIONAL REACH After watching many of its rivals catch up and overtake its fabled Asia-Pacific footprint in recent years, Burson-Marsteller—which celebrates its 40th anniversary in Asia this year—has begun to cautiously expand its presence once again. In 2010 it launched in Malaysia, and in 2011 it added a new office in Shenzhen. Significantly, it also inked a joint venture with Vietnam firm Chu Thi, giving it 20 www.holmesreport.com effective first-mover access to the booming market among international networks. The firm’s largest Asia-Pacific operations remain in the two fast-growing BRIC economies: India and China. In the former, the acquisition of Genesis, which now operates as Genesis Burson-Marsteller, established B-M overnight as a market leader in both size and sophistication; the firm offers comprehensive reach (seven offices) and impressive corporate expertise. In the latter, the firm has offices in Beijing, Chengdu, Guangzhou, Shenzhen and Shanghai, with the Greater China presence rounded out by a strong Hong Kong operation that serves as the hub for much of Burson’s regional public affairs business but has broadened its base in recent years. The firm also has improving operations in Japan, Singapore, and Australia, and supplemented its Korean operation through a partnership with local digital specialist Medicom. GLOBAL REACH Burson-Marsteller reestablished itself as one of the premier public relations firms in North America under the leadership of regional CEO Pat Ford, who in 2011 moved on to new responsibilities, leaving stewardship of the US operations to Dave DenHerder. He inherits an operation with formidable strength in the key markets of New York (a much more balanced portfolio of business than two or three years ago) and Washington, DC; a US footprint that includes established offices in Boston, California (three offices), Miami, Pittsburgh and Texas (another three offices); and two new offices in Memphis and Minneapolis. Compared to most of its multinational peers, Burson-Marsteller is either—depending on your perspective—under-represented in the UK (the London office accounts for just 10 percent of EMEA revenues, compared to almost half at some US-based firms) or unusually wellbalanced. BM is a market leader in several key markets: in Brussels, where it has fees of around €11 million and real depth of expertise in energy and healthcare; in France, where the addition of i&e gives it a team of 140 and strong C-suite relationships; in Finland, where Pohjoisranta was the market leader; and in Africa and the Middle East, where the Arcay and Asda’a acquisitions are now well integrated into the overall operation. EXPERTISE Burson-Marsteller is anxious to “re-energize best practices” and “unleash next practices.” In Asia, that means building on the firm’s historic strengths in corporate and public affairs, crisis management, top-tier media relations, and the technology sector, while expanding its brand marketing practice, and adding content creation, digital and social media, and data analytics capabilities. The firm has also expanded its US-China specialty group, which helps the growing number of Chinese companies expanding into global markets. All of which is not say that BM will be backing away from its traditional strengths in corporate, crisis and issues, and public affairs. TALENT The appointment in mid-2012 of Donald Baer as worldwide chair and chief executive triggered a series of senior management moves, with the departure of Bob Pickard from his Asia-Pacific leadership role and the transition of highly-regarded BM veteran Pat Ford as interim CEO for the region (in addition to his role as chief client officer). There is a strong executive team in place, with Christine Jones (Australia), Margaret Key (Korea), Prema Sagar (India) and Matthew Stafford (who took over Greater China following the departure of Chris Deri). New talent includes Robert Kapp, who previously headed his own firm and played a prominent role on the US-China Business Council, as a strategic advisor on the US-China specialty group and Jane Zhang who joined from Pfizer as director of government relations, while Angelina Ong
  22. 22. Consultancy Report Card 2013 Asia Pacific was promoted to lead the firm’s Shanghai office. CULTURE During his first eight months in the CEO role, Baer has visited many of the firm’s offices around the world, and the consensus appears to be that he is more accessible than his predecessor. Ford too brings a wealth of experience, having been credited with a cultural recovery in the North American operations. The firm has also committed to a new global training initiative with the to research and analytics has only deepened, with the development of several new tools including a social media listening service called BursonPulse and a text mining operation called BursonPivot. The firm’s partnership with Penn Schoen Berland also continues to produce an impressive volume of original research: its Global Social Media Checkup examines how leading companies are using social media; its Twiplomacy study looks at the use of Twitter by world leaders. The firm has also been producing white papers on topics from communicating via Weibo to tracking regulatory issues in India. BURSON-MARSTELLER IS ANXIOUS TO “RE-ENERGIZE BEST PRACTICES” AND “UNLEASH NEXT PRACTICES. IN ASIA, THAT ” MEANS BUILDING ON THE FIRM’S HISTORIC STRENGTHS IN CORPORATE AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS, CRISIS MANAGEMENT, TOP-TIER MEDIA RELATIONS, AND THE TECHNOLOGY SECTOR, WHILE EXPANDING ITS BRAND MARKETING PRACTICE, AND ADDING CONTENT CREATION, DIGITAL AND SOCIAL MEDIA, & DATA ANALYTICS CAPABILITIES. appointment of Gillian Edick as worldwide chair of training and development, introducing new programs focused on strategic counsel. INTELLECTUAL LEADERSHIP Despite the departure of Mark Penn, whose research background was clearly a factor in the firm’s adoption of its “evidence-based” positioning, Burson-Marsteller’s commitment 22 www.holmesreport.com PROGRAMS WPP’s work for Ford around the globe has been consistently strong, racking up awards in every region, and BM’s launch of the new Ecosport at the Delhi Auto Show was a standout, picking up a SABRE Awards—one of five last year (along with work for adidas, Big Daddy Entertainment, Doublemint, Sennheiser and Virgin Money). Other highlights included generating media coverage for First Solar in Australia; making the case for the International Copper Association as a voice for sustainable development in China; connecting Pepsi with a new generation in India through sponsorship of T20 football; and providing public affairs and advocacy support to Monsanto in Indonesia. BRAND As Burson-Marsteller celebrated its 60th anniversary in 2012, it stepped up its community service initiative—donating $1.6 million in in-kind service worldwide—and celebrating in individual markets with events for clients and friends. Expect more of the same in 2013 as the firm celebrates its 40th anniversary in Asia, and Genesis celebrates its 20th year in the Indian market. The appointment of Judith Ostronic—formerly with Genesis—as regional director for new business and marketing should help raise the firm’s profile, as should Ford’s heightened visibility. THE FUTURE Since Bill Rylance stepped down from his 10-year tenure as chief executive of Burson’s Asia-Pacific operations five years ago, the firm has had three regional CEOs. So the most important priority is for the latest of them, Pat Ford, to bring a little stability to the role. Not that BM has been foundering, exactly. But it doesn’t seem to have the momentum of some of its peers. One challenge will be continuing to expand beyond the bedrock corporate and public affairs business to stronger consumer and particularly digital capabilities—as the firm did with its new Korean partnership.
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  24. 24. Consultancy Report Card 2013 Asia Pacific EDELMAN HONG KONG H AUSTRALIA H CHINA H INDIA H INDONESIA H JAPAN H KOREA H MALAYSIA H SINGAPORE H TAIWAN David Brain There was double-digit growth in Australia, where Michelle Hutton runs a 90-person operation but growth was more modest in Indonesia, where Stephen Lock took the helm of the market leading 120-person Edelman office. The firm has bounced back in Korea, where it has a team of close to 70, up by 30 percent last year under SB Jang, remains strong in Singapore (a team of 80) and enjoyed good growth in Malaysia. Things have been a little tougher in Japan, where the firm has a team of more than 30 and real strength in corporate and financial, and there are smaller operations in Vietnam (30 people) Taiwan (20 people) MOMENTUM INTERNATIONAL REACH Another year of very healthy (22 percent, despite the fact that some Edelman business was transferred to sister company Zeno as part of its expansion into Asia) growth saw Edelman consolidate its position among the market leaders in the region, ending 2012 with fee income in excess of $77 million (up from less than $50 million two years ago) and more than 1,100 employees across the region. New business wins included Bloomberg, Kimbely-Clark and Manulife Financial on a regional level, plus local assignments from Dettol, Diageo, Ikea, KFC, Mars, Zynga, the European Union, and UN Women. Edelman’s topline growth in North America was 9.8 percent last year, slower than in recent years but still well ahead of the average for its peer group, and the firm ended the year with fee income in the US of $383 million (factor in Canada, and the North American number is comfortably above $400 million). The New York headquarters and the Chicago office where the firm was born continue to be market leaders, but there was more impressive growth in 2011 from secondary markets: the Texas operation led the way (in part due to the acquisition of Houston-based Vollmer); but San Francisco, Silicon Valley, and Washington, DC, all made strong contributions. The unrelenting upward trajectory of Edelman’s EMEA operation continued despite a difficult economy: the firm’s operations in the region grew by 15 percent during its last financial year (ending June 2012) and were on track for a healthy double-digit increase in the calendar year. The firm now has 1,150 people in 19 wholly-owned offices covering 19 markets, is a top three player in the UK, and has been growing impressively in the Middle East. REGIONAL REACH The biggest success story of the past couple of years is India, where Robert Holdheim has presided over growth of around 200 percent over the past couple of years, driven largely by the addition of the giant Tata account: Edelman now has fees of more than $10 million and a team of 275 in the market. China has continued its impressive performance and remains the largest part of Edelman’s now-consolidated Asia operations, with 220 people generating fees of around $19 million on the mainland, supplemented by a team of 70 in Hong Kong. 24 www.holmesreport.com EXPERTISE Edelman’s traditional strength—particularly in the US—has been in consumer and healthcare, but the largest practice in the Asia-Pacific region is corporate and financial, which accounts for 40 percent of the firm’s revenues across the region, and about half in markets such as Australia, Hong Kong and Indonesia, and includes expertise in corporate reputation, crisis and issues management, and corporate responsibility. The consumer practice is about a quarter of overall fees and is particularly strong in China. The tech practice is close to 20 percent, and includes some of the firm’s marquee clients such as RIM and HP. Healthcare accounts for less than 10 percent of revenues in the region. The digital practice, which contributes about 7 percent of revenues, is the fastest-growing part of the operation, and looks even more impressive when one accounts for the digital and social media work that is integrated into the consumer practice. TALENT David Brain is bringing the same sure touch to Asia that he demonstrated in EMEA, getting the best out of existing talent and supplementing it where necessary with new blood. Key appointments included Steven Cao, promoted to president of the firm’s Pegasus unit to oversee all China operations; Cornelia Kunze, who followed Brain from EMEA (where she led the consumer practice from Hamburg) as vice chairman, based in Mumbia; Ashutosh Munshi, a 10-year Edelman veteran, as co-lead for the consumer practice, also based in Mumbia; Chadd McLisky, former founder and CEO of the Edelman Indopacific group in Indonesia, as chair of the corporate practice, based in Jakarta; and Amanda Goh, returning from Edelman New York, as managing director of the Singapore office. The firm also brought in new talent: Tom Mattia, a veteran of senior in-house and agency positions, as chairman
  25. 25. National multi-office multi-specialty firms of the China operations; Gavin Coombes, from digital agency Profero, as president of digital; Cindy Tian, formerly with BursonMarsteller, as head of public affairs in China; and Gavin Anderson veteran Deborah Hayden as regional director of capital markets communication. CULTURE A significant investment in professional development since Brain took the helm has seen Edelman offer a mix of global initiatives (training in its public engagement model, its digital “belt” system, and its leadership Compass program); regional efforts (the media “cloverleaf” that offers grounding in paid, earned, owned and shared media); and local courses under the Edel U umbrella. INTELLECTUAL LEADERSHIP In addition to the continuation of Edelman’s trademark Trust Barometer (which now includes nine Asia-Pacific markets), the firm has been producing plenty of global and local thought leadership. Its 8095 study, for example, focuses on millennials (born between 1980 and 1995) and their connections with brands; a separate Asian initiatives involved spending four weeks with members of the 70s generation in China, meeting their families and friends and listening to their opinions on a wide range of issues. Identifying another hot button issue, the firm also introduced its Privacy Risk Index, surveying risk managers and security professionals in 29 markets. PROGRAMS Some of Edelman’s best work saw it adding a local twist to its global efforts: so for Unilever’s Axe brand, for example, the firm selected young ambassadors for a social media campaign in Japan, designed to overcome the body spray’s “foreign” image. A REVIEW OF EDELMAN’S OPERATIONS IN THE MAJOR MARKETS ACROSS ASIA-PACIFIC REVEALS NO OBVIOUS GEOGRAPHIC WEAKNESS: IT HAS PERHAPS THE BEST BALANCED PORTFOLIO IN THE REGION. Other highlights range from a corporate brand positioning effort for Volvo in China, reinforcing the company’s environmental performance, to an effort showcasing thought leadership for the Business Software Alliance in India to community engagement for Tetra Pak in Korea. In the events arena, Edelman coordinated HP’s first ever global influencer summit, an event in Shanghai for 600 media and other opinion leaders, while a high-profile local campaign saw Edelman bring together 500 journalists for the grand opening of the Sands Cotai Central, generating 1,500 pieces of coverage for the new resort. THE FUTURE A review of Edelman’s operations in the major markets across Asia-Pacific reveals no obvious geographic weakness: it has perhaps the best balanced portfolio in the region. If there’s a criticism to be made, it’s that Edelman doesn’t seem to have as many of high-profile, mission-critical assignments in Asia—particularly in the corporate, crisis, and public affairs realm—as it now has in the US or Europe. If it can continue to build on its strong existing operations and move up the value chain, its recent success in the region should be sustainable for the foreseeable future. BRAND Edelman is clearly differentiated by its status as the only independent among the top 10; it has a clear point of view, articulated fearlessly by Richard Edelman and David Brain and others; and it promotes itself via a wide range of research, all designed to underscore its key strengths. The long-running and oftquoted Trust Barometer is the most prominent marketing platform, creating the foundation for media interviews, conferences and seminars. All of that makes a contribution to impressive share of voice and to one of the strongest brands in the business. www.holmesreport.com 25
  26. 26. Consultancy Report Card 2013 Asia Pacific FLEISHMAN-HILLARD HONG KONG H AUSTRALIA H CHINA H INDIA H JAPAN H KOREA H MALAYSIA H PHILIPPINES H SINGAPORE Lynne Anne Davis MOMENTUM The long-term growth story is impressive: Fleishman-Hillard’s Asia-Pacific operations have doubled in size over the past five years (without any acquisitions), elevating the firm from a challenger to a top-tier player in the region. Last year saw another 18 percent expansion, with offices in mainland China, Indonesia and the Philippines leading the way—all up by better than 40 percent. The firm added almost 200 new retainer clients—Japan Airlines, HP, China Wanda Group, Nestle, and Diageo were among the most notable— and another 60 doubled their spending with the firm, while 50 expanded their relationship with FH to include additional offices. The top 10 clients—a list that includes Philips, P&G, Visa, Li-Ning, Daimler, and GE and has an average tenure of more than six years—grew by 26 percent. REGIONAL REACH Fleishman-Hillard now has 19 offices in the region, matching the footprint of any of its longer-established competitors. There’s no doubt that China is now the major engine for growth, with revenues from the mainland up by 45 percent, and even the Hong Kong office growing by close to 20 percent. China 26 www.holmesreport.com is a powerhouse for many firms, but few of Fleishman’s competitors can make the same claim for Japan, which continues to make an impressive contribution to both regional revenues—up 10 percent in 2012—and intellectual leadership (it’s home to the Vox public affairs operation and the Blue Current digital and social media specialist offer). The firm’s Korea office is impressive, home to many major corporate and public sector accounts, and the relatively young Indian operation continues to attract both top talent and new business. There was additional growth last year in Indonesia and the Philippines (both up by 40 percent or more); Australia and Malaysia (double digit growth); and Singapore. INTERNATIONAL REACH Fleishman-Hillard’s North American business continues to be the home of 75 percent of its seven-figure clients, the birthplace of much of its most innovative thinking, and the engine of much of its growth ($100 million in new business last year). With 1,800 people spread across 48 offices in the region, FH has by far the broadest geographic footprint, with powerhouse operations in Washington, DC, (400 people spread across four brands); New York (200 people); the Midwest (500 in the St Louis headquarters and Chicago, Kansas City, Minneapolis, Detroit and Cleveland offices); as well as California, Texas, and Florida. Fleishman-Hillard has 16 offices in the EMEA region—not as many as the largest of its peers, but enough to give it comprehensive coverage of the major markets. The firm has considerable depth in key markets such as the UK, Brussels, and Germany; strength in Dublin, Paris, Rome and Moscow; and growing operations in Poland, the Czech Republic, and the Middle East. EXPERTISE Fleishman-Hillard has long been known for its strong corporate practice, and that part of the business—including a burgeoning public affairs capability—showed the strongest growth in 2012, up by 40 percent as the firm continued to target corporate consulting assignments and to work with clients such as GE, Visa, the Export-Import Bank of Korea, and the Prime Minister’s Office of Japan. The past couple of years have seen significant diversification, with the expansion of several brands well established in the US marketplace to Asia. The core FH business is now supplemented by FH Global Capital Markets Services, focused on investor relations, grabbing a place among the top five transaction advisors in the region by value of deals worked according to mergermarket; public affairs specialist Vox Global, based in Japan; and digital and social media specialist BlueCurrent, which added an office in China to its well-established Tokyo HQ. TALENT With 12 years at the helm of Fleishman’s Asia-Pacific operations, Lynne-Anne Davis is now the longest-tenured region CEO of any of the majors, and she has a leadership team with similar experience: Shin Tanaka in Japan celebrated 15 years with FH last year; China president Li Hong, Korean managing director Yvonne Park, Manila general manager Cosette Romero and Bejing GM Lydie Liu all have 10 years under their respective belts. While the firm continue to promote extensively from within, new additions included Miranda Cai as general manager in Shanghai; Brian West as head of the Asia reputation management and global crisis practices; Indranil Ghosh as GM in Mumbai; Rahul Mehta as GM in New Delhi; Don Anderson as senior VP, digital integration; and Sally Woo as the firm’s first regional head of talent development. There were promotions too, for Chomaine Chai (now GM in Kuala Lumpur); Miranda Cai (GM in Shanghai); and James Smith-Plenderleith (head of the regional healthcare practice).

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