Drama 2010-2011<br />Chinese Theater<br />
Beginnings of Chinese Theater <br />Since 100 BCE there has been some records of theatrical performance during the Shang D...
Shadow Plays<br />
Shadow Play<br />Shadow puppetry became famous during the Dynasty of Empress Ling<br />There are two distinct forms of pup...
Shadow Play continued…<br />Cantonese shadow puppets were the largest of the two<br />Pekingese puppets were smaller and m...
Chinese Opera<br />
Chinese Opera<br />During the Song Dynasty, there were many popular plays involving acrobatics and music.<br />In the Yuan...
Beijing (Peking) Opera<br />
Beijing Opera continued…<br />Beijing Opera combines music, vocal performances, mime, dance, and acrobats.<br />Developed ...
Beijing Opera Continued…<br />There are over 1,400 works based on Chinese history, folklore, and now contemporary life.<br...
Beijing Opera continued…<br />Any performances without Communist themes were “subversive” and banned.<br />Jiang Qing, Mao...
Beijing Opera continued…<br />The Republic of China in Taiwan took Beijing Opera as “political symbolism” in which the Kuo...
Training in Beijing Opera<br />Requires a long and arduous apprenticeship from an early age (usually a 7 year apprenticesh...
The Roles in Beijing Opera<br />Sheng<br />
The Roles in Beijing Opera<br />Dan<br />
The Roles in Beijing Opera<br />Jing<br />
The Roles in Beijing Opera<br />Chou<br />
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Chinese theater

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Chinese theater

  1. 1. Drama 2010-2011<br />Chinese Theater<br />
  2. 2.
  3. 3. Beginnings of Chinese Theater <br />Since 100 BCE there has been some records of theatrical performance during the Shang Dynasty.<br />These performances would include music, clowning, and acrobatic displays.<br />Theater flourished in the Tang Dynasty, also known as “The Age of 1,000 Entertainments”.<br />The first evidence of Chinese opera was created by Ming Huang who began the Pear Garden school whose theater was based primarily around music.<br />
  4. 4. Shadow Plays<br />
  5. 5. Shadow Play<br />Shadow puppetry became famous during the Dynasty of Empress Ling<br />There are two distinct forms of puppetry:<br />Cantonese<br />Pekingese<br />The differences were the positioning and making of the puppets<br />Both styles performed plays depicting great adventures and fantasy<br />
  6. 6. Shadow Play continued…<br />Cantonese shadow puppets were the largest of the two<br />Pekingese puppets were smaller and more delicate.<br />Puppets are painted with vibrant colors and cast a colorful shadow.<br />After shows, the puppet’s head would be taken off so that it would not come alive.<br />Shadow puppetry came to its height until it was sued for political purposes.<br />
  7. 7. Chinese Opera<br />
  8. 8. Chinese Opera<br />During the Song Dynasty, there were many popular plays involving acrobatics and music.<br />In the Yuan Dynasty this developed into a more sophisticated structure with a four or five act structure.<br />Yuan drama spread across the country into various forms with Beijing Opera being the most famous form.<br />
  9. 9. Beijing (Peking) Opera<br />
  10. 10. Beijing Opera continued…<br />Beijing Opera combines music, vocal performances, mime, dance, and acrobats.<br />Developed in the 18th Century and established in the 19th Century.<br />Very popular in the Qing Dynasty court.<br />Considered a cultural treasure of China.<br />The performers are the focus and actors are judged by their graceful movements.<br />Actors must adhere to specialized movements and conventions.<br />
  11. 11. Beijing Opera Continued…<br />There are over 1,400 works based on Chinese history, folklore, and now contemporary life.<br />Beijing Opera was an exclusively male pursuit.<br />During the 1870’s women began to appear unofficially.<br />In 1911 females were officially allowed to perform, but for many years the all make company would be preferred.<br />During the Communist take over, the Chinese Communist Party sought to bring art into line with Communist ideology.<br />
  12. 12. Beijing Opera continued…<br />Any performances without Communist themes were “subversive” and banned.<br />Jiang Qing, Mao’s wife, chose eight model plays that could still be performed which included 5 Beijing Operas.<br />These plays would be altered with their endings changed.<br />As the Cultural Revolution (1966-1976) raged on, Beijing Opera would be banned and theaters shut down and destroyed.<br />
  13. 13. Beijing Opera continued…<br />The Republic of China in Taiwan took Beijing Opera as “political symbolism” in which the Kuomintang wanted Beijing Opera to take over other indigenous arts.<br />The R.O.C. wanted to be the sole representative of Chinese culture.<br />This occurred at the expense of Taiwanese opera, but currently, the interest in Taiwanese opera continues to grow.<br />
  14. 14. Training in Beijing Opera<br />Requires a long and arduous apprenticeship from an early age (usually a 7 year apprenticeship)<br />The students would acquire debt to his master and repay him through performances.<br />Students would rise at 5:00 in the morning for exercise<br />IN the daytime for acting and combat<br />At night they performed in outdoor theaters.<br />If mistakes were made each member of the company would be beaten.<br />
  15. 15. The Roles in Beijing Opera<br />Sheng<br />
  16. 16. The Roles in Beijing Opera<br />Dan<br />
  17. 17. The Roles in Beijing Opera<br />Jing<br />
  18. 18. The Roles in Beijing Opera<br />Chou<br />

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