V Encuentros de Centros de Documentación de Arte Contemporáneo ARTIUM - Martin Flynn

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Ponencia de Martin Flynn, responsable de los Servicios de Información V&A, Londres, para los V Encuentros de Centros de Documentación de ARTIUM.

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V Encuentros de Centros de Documentación de Arte Contemporáneo ARTIUM - Martin Flynn

  1. 1. Closing the Gap – Maximising the Potential of Technological Innovation for the Discovery and Delivery of Art Information V Conference – ARTIUM, 4 November 2010 Martin Flynn
  2. 2. V&A - Home of National Art Library 2
  3. 3. Themes  Technological innovation – some general observations  Art institutional websites  Aggregated websites  Library catalogues  Commercial publishing 3
  4. 4. 4 Phases of Implementing New Technology  Adoption  Adaptation  Absorption  Time lag for full understanding
  5. 5. 5 New Technology in Action – Some Examples  Early printed books  Mobile Phones  TV/Video  Digital Radio  Interactive Digital TV
  6. 6. 6 Early Printed Books  Hybrid model of print and painting  Mimicking manuscript techniques
  7. 7. 7 Mobile/Cell Phones  Executive status  Landline on the move  Adoption by teenagers unanticipated  Texting a minor feature  Camera, video, music, internet, apps unanticipated
  8. 8. 8 First Mobile Phone ‘
  9. 9. 9 Television Recording  Logical combination of equipment but not generally marketed  Separation allows for greater sales through updates
  10. 10. 10 DAB Radio  Considered to be the future of radio  Large investment by BBC  Failed to achieve quality of FM  Required new player  Didn’t fully anticipate online listening
  11. 11. 11 HD Radio  Now seen as way forward for radio broadcasting  Reflects general developments in media access
  12. 12. 12 Interactive Digital TV  Firmly believed that this was the way forward about ten years ago  Resistance from users  Remote control lacked the flexibility of keyboard  Slowness of operation
  13. 13. Institutional Websites – Comparison Between British Museum and V&A  BM has 2 million catalogue entries for online for their print collection  30% of these have one or more image attached i.e. over half a million images  Achieved through integrating into workflow of all staff  Difficult to find on website as requires user to know organisational structure and professional terminology  Images not searchable through the image function of search engines  Some poor quality images i.e. text within them is unreadable  Engages with users by welcoming their input 13
  14. 14. Sample page from BM 14
  15. 15. The Victoria and Albert Museum (V&A)  1 million catalogue entries for a range of museum objects online  13% of these have images attached i.e. about 130k images  Dedicated and project staff undertake this work so most staff are not directly engaged with the full process  Images are searchable through the image function of search engines  Presentation is very attractive  Metadata is extremely variable  No engagement with users – a one way process 15
  16. 16. Sample Page from V&A 16
  17. 17. Challenges  Duplication of effort and content  No integrated searching of books, museum objects and archives  Poor subject searching  Lack of linking to book catalogues  Invisibility within organisational website 17
  18. 18. Aggregated Websites  VADS (Visual Arts Data Service)  Kultur Project – institutional repository  Culture Online  Every Object Tells a Story  24 Hour Museum  Intute
  19. 19. Aggregated Websites  Suncat  Copac  artlibraries.net  WorldCat  OCLC 19
  20. 20. VADS
  21. 21. KULTUR
  22. 22. Culture Online
  23. 23. Every Object Tells a Story
  24. 24. 24 Hour Museum
  25. 25. intute
  26. 26. V&A Website as a Comparison
  27. 27. SUNCAT
  28. 28. RLUK - COPAC
  29. 29. OCLC - WorldCat
  30. 30. OCLC  72k library members out of 1.2m libraries worldwide  Net scale ambitions  170m records (a third of these added in the last 18 months)  15.5b books in libraries  5k transactions per second in libraries across the world  See the choice as between collective innovation and silo cottage industry
  31. 31. National Art Library Catalogue 31
  32. 32. National Art Library Catalogue 32
  33. 33. 33 Catalogue Problems  Contents invisible to search engines  Process of cataloguing is complex and difficult to master  Users struggle to understand catalogues  Duplication of effort in catalogue creation  Doubt about whether the current model of localised catalogues is sustainable
  34. 34. 34 Catalogue Problems  Automated versions of card catalogues  Lack the enhanced features users have come to expect  Printed materials to the exclusion of digital formats  Confusing search methods  Poorly organised results  Search dead-ends  Catalogues are effectively over- engineered
  35. 35. 35 The Catalogue of the Future  Re-use data available at the point of selection or automatically generate this information  Manual data creation should be reserved for ordering, receiving, claiming and cataloguing for those situations in which it is the only viable approach  Local customization eliminated in favour of accepting as much cataloguing copy as possible
  36. 36. 36 The Catalogue of the Future  Assist the searcher by providing hints and suggestions in a commercially disinterested way  Abandon local catalogues in favour of unified catalogues based on sectoral, national, trans-national or subject parameters  Catalogues should understand the common use of terms and weigh results towards these
  37. 37. 37 The Catalogue of the Future  It should be possible to refine a search through faceted navigation, filtering your results in multiple ways  Link to LibraryThing to take advantage of their 16 million user generated tags  The fast turnaround and delivery of library materials to the users should be the standard of quality service, not the fullness of catalogue data  Abandon comprehensive LCSH subject analysis in favour of subject keywords
  38. 38. 38 The Catalogue of the Future  Customised cataloguing effort should be concentrated on rare and unique special material  ‘More like this’  New book lists  Reviews  Best-match retrieval  No search dead-ends  ‘See also’ and ‘see instead’
  39. 39. 39 The Catalogue of the Future  Relevancy ranking  Subject guides  Items tagged according to their level e.g. suitable for beginners, domain experts etc  Summaries/excerpts highly visible in the catalogue
  40. 40. 40 The Catalogue of the Future  Links to further information such as Wikipedia, specialist web pages and library resources  Links to full text, abstracts etc  Information on how and where to obtain a copy or facsimile  Journal contents catalogued
  41. 41. 41 The Catalogue of the Future  The discovery of books, journals, journal articles and digital resources should be federated  Links to citations and reviews  Tables of contents, cover images and blurbs  Faceted navigation enabling the filtering of results in multiple ways
  42. 42. Example of Hard Copy/Digitally Published Product  Physical format drawbacks – very small print, poor paper quality, old- fashioned notion of who is important in today’s world  Costs approximately 230 euros annually for book  Online version also available for a further 230 euros but you must buy the book as well!  Publishers veering between panic and denial
  43. 43. ARLIS UK & Ireland – Art Libraries Society
  44. 44. Arlis UK & Ireland  Operating for 40 years  A model for other similar societies in Scandanavia, Australia, US etc  International status  Employ an administrator  Fee based  Income declining  Operational basis under threat
  45. 45. MLAG – Museum Librarians and Archivists Group
  46. 46. MLAG  Operating for 8 years  No fees  All activity voluntary  Cheap but mainly free courses  Blog rather than website  Share membership with ARLIS but different cultures affect organisational behaviour  Expanding role and influence

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