SlideShare a Scribd company logo

Arrow Adoption Training for Kinship Families

Arrow Adoption Training for Kinship Families

1 of 46
Download to read offline
Arrow Adoption Training for Kinship Families
Learning Goals and Objectives
 Separation, Attachment, Grief, and Loss
 The Role of CPS and the child’s DFPS CPS Case Worker
 The Role of Arrow and Arrow’s Case Manager
 Special Needs Adoption
 Transracial and Cross-Cultural Adoptions
 Disruption/Dissolution and Ways to Prevent it
 Community Resources, Post Adoption Services, and Tax Credit
A bit about Arrow…
 Each year, Arrow’s programs serve over 4,000
children and families!
 #TogetherKidsWin
 Since 1992, Arrow has been fighting the effects of
child abuse by helping kids heal from the past, and
strengthening families to break the cycle of abuse
and neglect
Kinship Foster Care
 What is Kinship?
 Why is Kinship a preferred placement
for children in care?
“Children are a gift of the
Lord...like arrows in the hand of a
warrior so are the children of
one’s youth.”
PSALM 127:3-4
Separation,
Attachment,
Grief, and
Loss
This Photo by Unknown Author is licensed under CC BY-NC-ND

Recommended

Cpc learning module 8 reference revision and review
Cpc learning module 8 reference revision and reviewCpc learning module 8 reference revision and review
Cpc learning module 8 reference revision and reviewDr. Vikas Khakare
 
Code of civil procedure 1986 supplemental proceeding
Code of civil procedure 1986 supplemental proceedingCode of civil procedure 1986 supplemental proceeding
Code of civil procedure 1986 supplemental proceedingDr. Vikas Khakare
 
Due Process
Due ProcessDue Process
Due Processsaldanae
 
Cpc learning module 5 execution
Cpc learning module 5 executionCpc learning module 5 execution
Cpc learning module 5 executionDr. Vikas Khakare
 

More Related Content

What's hot

Important Maxims in Law of Torts
Important Maxims in Law of TortsImportant Maxims in Law of Torts
Important Maxims in Law of TortsDr. sonali Gaikwad
 
Introduction to tort
Introduction to tortIntroduction to tort
Introduction to tortwaseemkhanpbn
 
Criminal Law - Difference between criminal misappropriation and theft
Criminal Law - Difference between criminal misappropriation and theftCriminal Law - Difference between criminal misappropriation and theft
Criminal Law - Difference between criminal misappropriation and theftsurrenderyourthrone
 
Code of civil procedure 1908 decree, order
Code of civil procedure 1908 decree, orderCode of civil procedure 1908 decree, order
Code of civil procedure 1908 decree, orderDr. Vikas Khakare
 
Streamlining section 125, crpc on maintenance
Streamlining section 125, crpc on maintenanceStreamlining section 125, crpc on maintenance
Streamlining section 125, crpc on maintenancemohakumar
 
Vicarious Liability in Islamic Law of Tort
Vicarious Liability in Islamic Law of TortVicarious Liability in Islamic Law of Tort
Vicarious Liability in Islamic Law of TortSnj SNj
 
Concept of will & Law of Will in India
Concept of will & Law of Will in IndiaConcept of will & Law of Will in India
Concept of will & Law of Will in IndiaIra Gupta
 
Introduction to Moot Court
Introduction to Moot CourtIntroduction to Moot Court
Introduction to Moot CourtJaMshed AhMed
 
Lecture 8 non fatal offences
Lecture 8 non fatal offencesLecture 8 non fatal offences
Lecture 8 non fatal offencesfatima d
 
DECREE- CIVIL PROCEDURE CODE (ALL ABOUT DECREE)
DECREE- CIVIL PROCEDURE CODE (ALL ABOUT DECREE)DECREE- CIVIL PROCEDURE CODE (ALL ABOUT DECREE)
DECREE- CIVIL PROCEDURE CODE (ALL ABOUT DECREE)Priyanka Chauhan
 
Negligence & defamation
Negligence & defamationNegligence & defamation
Negligence & defamationQuincy Kiptoo
 
Principles of Law of Succession
Principles of Law of SuccessionPrinciples of Law of Succession
Principles of Law of SuccessionPreeti Sikder
 
Code of civil procedure 1908 summons
Code of civil procedure 1908 summonsCode of civil procedure 1908 summons
Code of civil procedure 1908 summonsDr. Vikas Khakare
 
Code of civil procedure 1908 incidental proceedings
Code of civil procedure 1908 incidental proceedingsCode of civil procedure 1908 incidental proceedings
Code of civil procedure 1908 incidental proceedingsDr. Vikas Khakare
 

What's hot (20)

Limitation act,1963
Limitation act,1963Limitation act,1963
Limitation act,1963
 
Important Maxims in Law of Torts
Important Maxims in Law of TortsImportant Maxims in Law of Torts
Important Maxims in Law of Torts
 
Introduction to tort
Introduction to tortIntroduction to tort
Introduction to tort
 
General clauses act
General clauses actGeneral clauses act
General clauses act
 
Criminal Law - Difference between criminal misappropriation and theft
Criminal Law - Difference between criminal misappropriation and theftCriminal Law - Difference between criminal misappropriation and theft
Criminal Law - Difference between criminal misappropriation and theft
 
Code of civil procedure 1908 decree, order
Code of civil procedure 1908 decree, orderCode of civil procedure 1908 decree, order
Code of civil procedure 1908 decree, order
 
Commission order 26
Commission order 26Commission order 26
Commission order 26
 
Right of bail
Right of bailRight of bail
Right of bail
 
Jeyarajan v Jeyarajan
Jeyarajan v JeyarajanJeyarajan v Jeyarajan
Jeyarajan v Jeyarajan
 
Streamlining section 125, crpc on maintenance
Streamlining section 125, crpc on maintenanceStreamlining section 125, crpc on maintenance
Streamlining section 125, crpc on maintenance
 
Vicarious Liability in Islamic Law of Tort
Vicarious Liability in Islamic Law of TortVicarious Liability in Islamic Law of Tort
Vicarious Liability in Islamic Law of Tort
 
Concept of will & Law of Will in India
Concept of will & Law of Will in IndiaConcept of will & Law of Will in India
Concept of will & Law of Will in India
 
Introduction to Moot Court
Introduction to Moot CourtIntroduction to Moot Court
Introduction to Moot Court
 
Lecture 8 non fatal offences
Lecture 8 non fatal offencesLecture 8 non fatal offences
Lecture 8 non fatal offences
 
DECREE- CIVIL PROCEDURE CODE (ALL ABOUT DECREE)
DECREE- CIVIL PROCEDURE CODE (ALL ABOUT DECREE)DECREE- CIVIL PROCEDURE CODE (ALL ABOUT DECREE)
DECREE- CIVIL PROCEDURE CODE (ALL ABOUT DECREE)
 
Bail-bond
Bail-bondBail-bond
Bail-bond
 
Negligence & defamation
Negligence & defamationNegligence & defamation
Negligence & defamation
 
Principles of Law of Succession
Principles of Law of SuccessionPrinciples of Law of Succession
Principles of Law of Succession
 
Code of civil procedure 1908 summons
Code of civil procedure 1908 summonsCode of civil procedure 1908 summons
Code of civil procedure 1908 summons
 
Code of civil procedure 1908 incidental proceedings
Code of civil procedure 1908 incidental proceedingsCode of civil procedure 1908 incidental proceedings
Code of civil procedure 1908 incidental proceedings
 

Similar to Arrow Adoption Training for Kinship Families

Kaleidoscope Overview
Kaleidoscope OverviewKaleidoscope Overview
Kaleidoscope OverviewCraig
 
Education and development unit9
Education and development unit9Education and development unit9
Education and development unit9techsupport123
 
Individualized family support program version3
Individualized family support program version3Individualized family support program version3
Individualized family support program version3Abdul Basit
 
Right help - Right Time, Safeguarding guidance from Birmingham Council
Right help - Right Time, Safeguarding guidance from Birmingham CouncilRight help - Right Time, Safeguarding guidance from Birmingham Council
Right help - Right Time, Safeguarding guidance from Birmingham CouncilThe Pathway Group
 
Proteus Foster Family Agency
Proteus  Foster  Family  AgencyProteus  Foster  Family  Agency
Proteus Foster Family AgencyAdriana Vasquez
 
Proteus foster family agency
Proteus foster family agencyProteus foster family agency
Proteus foster family agencyAdriana Vasquez
 
Building the Protective Factors in the Community and Appropriate Response
Building the Protective Factors in the Community and Appropriate ResponseBuilding the Protective Factors in the Community and Appropriate Response
Building the Protective Factors in the Community and Appropriate ResponseChildren’s Trust of South Carolina
 
Angels foster care of santa barbara
Angels foster care of santa barbaraAngels foster care of santa barbara
Angels foster care of santa barbaraDoina Mocanu
 
Strengthening Families in Child Welfare Professional Development
Strengthening Families in Child Welfare Professional DevelopmentStrengthening Families in Child Welfare Professional Development
Strengthening Families in Child Welfare Professional Developmentk.stepleton
 
Rider, 2005 Comparison of CW-BH Values and Principles
Rider, 2005 Comparison of CW-BH Values and PrinciplesRider, 2005 Comparison of CW-BH Values and Principles
Rider, 2005 Comparison of CW-BH Values and PrinciplesFrank Rider
 
Parent and child fostering guide.pdf
Parent and child fostering guide.pdfParent and child fostering guide.pdf
Parent and child fostering guide.pdfF5 Foster Care
 
Develop and support families
Develop and support familiesDevelop and support families
Develop and support familiesGia McKinzie
 
Develop and Support Families
Develop and Support FamiliesDevelop and Support Families
Develop and Support FamiliesGia McKinzie
 
Implementing SF in ECE Programs
Implementing SF in ECE ProgramsImplementing SF in ECE Programs
Implementing SF in ECE Programsk.stepleton
 
Homelessness, Housing And Or Child Welfare
Homelessness, Housing And Or Child WelfareHomelessness, Housing And Or Child Welfare
Homelessness, Housing And Or Child WelfareLori Flores
 
Assessment 1 cluster 5 part b
Assessment 1 cluster 5 part bAssessment 1 cluster 5 part b
Assessment 1 cluster 5 part bJanita Lindner
 

Similar to Arrow Adoption Training for Kinship Families (20)

Kaleidoscope Overview
Kaleidoscope OverviewKaleidoscope Overview
Kaleidoscope Overview
 
Education and development unit9
Education and development unit9Education and development unit9
Education and development unit9
 
Individualized family support program version3
Individualized family support program version3Individualized family support program version3
Individualized family support program version3
 
Right help - Right Time, Safeguarding guidance from Birmingham Council
Right help - Right Time, Safeguarding guidance from Birmingham CouncilRight help - Right Time, Safeguarding guidance from Birmingham Council
Right help - Right Time, Safeguarding guidance from Birmingham Council
 
Proteus Foster Family Agency
Proteus  Foster  Family  AgencyProteus  Foster  Family  Agency
Proteus Foster Family Agency
 
Proteus foster family agency
Proteus foster family agencyProteus foster family agency
Proteus foster family agency
 
Building the Protective Factors in the Community and Appropriate Response
Building the Protective Factors in the Community and Appropriate ResponseBuilding the Protective Factors in the Community and Appropriate Response
Building the Protective Factors in the Community and Appropriate Response
 
Angels foster care of santa barbara
Angels foster care of santa barbaraAngels foster care of santa barbara
Angels foster care of santa barbara
 
Strengthening Families in Child Welfare Professional Development
Strengthening Families in Child Welfare Professional DevelopmentStrengthening Families in Child Welfare Professional Development
Strengthening Families in Child Welfare Professional Development
 
Grant Application
Grant ApplicationGrant Application
Grant Application
 
Resume
ResumeResume
Resume
 
Childcare Near Me
Childcare Near MeChildcare Near Me
Childcare Near Me
 
Rider, 2005 Comparison of CW-BH Values and Principles
Rider, 2005 Comparison of CW-BH Values and PrinciplesRider, 2005 Comparison of CW-BH Values and Principles
Rider, 2005 Comparison of CW-BH Values and Principles
 
Parent and child fostering guide.pdf
Parent and child fostering guide.pdfParent and child fostering guide.pdf
Parent and child fostering guide.pdf
 
Develop and support families
Develop and support familiesDevelop and support families
Develop and support families
 
Develop and Support Families
Develop and Support FamiliesDevelop and Support Families
Develop and Support Families
 
Safeguards for Youth Briefing
Safeguards for Youth BriefingSafeguards for Youth Briefing
Safeguards for Youth Briefing
 
Implementing SF in ECE Programs
Implementing SF in ECE ProgramsImplementing SF in ECE Programs
Implementing SF in ECE Programs
 
Homelessness, Housing And Or Child Welfare
Homelessness, Housing And Or Child WelfareHomelessness, Housing And Or Child Welfare
Homelessness, Housing And Or Child Welfare
 
Assessment 1 cluster 5 part b
Assessment 1 cluster 5 part bAssessment 1 cluster 5 part b
Assessment 1 cluster 5 part b
 

Recently uploaded

ORAU Story 2023 (Annual Report of Accomplishments)
ORAU Story 2023 (Annual Report of Accomplishments)ORAU Story 2023 (Annual Report of Accomplishments)
ORAU Story 2023 (Annual Report of Accomplishments)ORAU
 
Beyond COP28 (Extract from Agenda2024 Publication)
Beyond COP28 (Extract from Agenda2024 Publication)Beyond COP28 (Extract from Agenda2024 Publication)
Beyond COP28 (Extract from Agenda2024 Publication)Energy for One World
 
Presentation of the European Youth Foundation
Presentation of the European Youth FoundationPresentation of the European Youth Foundation
Presentation of the European Youth FoundationEuropeanYouthFoundation
 
Item # 6 - Municipal Court Appointments.
Item # 6 - Municipal Court Appointments.Item # 6 - Municipal Court Appointments.
Item # 6 - Municipal Court Appointments.ahcitycouncil
 
PPT ITem # 10 - 1st Qtr Financial & Inv. Report
PPT ITem # 10 - 1st Qtr Financial & Inv. ReportPPT ITem # 10 - 1st Qtr Financial & Inv. Report
PPT ITem # 10 - 1st Qtr Financial & Inv. Reportahcitycouncil
 
PPT Item # 2 -- Announcements Powerpoint
PPT Item # 2 -- Announcements PowerpointPPT Item # 2 -- Announcements Powerpoint
PPT Item # 2 -- Announcements Powerpointahcitycouncil
 
IIED's environmental sustainability impact report 2022/23
IIED's environmental sustainability impact report 2022/23IIED's environmental sustainability impact report 2022/23
IIED's environmental sustainability impact report 2022/23IIED
 
Tom Tresser "Civics 101" Intrdouction - 2/24
Tom Tresser "Civics 101" Intrdouction - 2/24Tom Tresser "Civics 101" Intrdouction - 2/24
Tom Tresser "Civics 101" Intrdouction - 2/24Tom Tresser
 
Tax cuts today, spending cuts tomorrow? How the Budget might shape the Genera...
Tax cuts today, spending cuts tomorrow? How the Budget might shape the Genera...Tax cuts today, spending cuts tomorrow? How the Budget might shape the Genera...
Tax cuts today, spending cuts tomorrow? How the Budget might shape the Genera...ResolutionFoundation
 
UN Summit of the Future: Draft Outcome Document
UN Summit of the Future: Draft Outcome DocumentUN Summit of the Future: Draft Outcome Document
UN Summit of the Future: Draft Outcome DocumentEnergy for One World
 
PPT Item # 6 - Municipal Court Appointments
PPT Item # 6 - Municipal Court AppointmentsPPT Item # 6 - Municipal Court Appointments
PPT Item # 6 - Municipal Court Appointmentsahcitycouncil
 
IEF Energy Outlooks Comparison Report-2024
IEF Energy Outlooks Comparison Report-2024IEF Energy Outlooks Comparison Report-2024
IEF Energy Outlooks Comparison Report-2024Energy for One World
 
United Nations Global Compact Network Georgia 2023 Value Propistion_ENG.pdf
United Nations Global Compact Network Georgia 2023 Value Propistion_ENG.pdfUnited Nations Global Compact Network Georgia 2023 Value Propistion_ENG.pdf
United Nations Global Compact Network Georgia 2023 Value Propistion_ENG.pdfUNGlobalCompactNetwo1
 
PPT Item # 9 - 2023 Racial Profiling Annual Report
PPT Item # 9 - 2023 Racial Profiling Annual ReportPPT Item # 9 - 2023 Racial Profiling Annual Report
PPT Item # 9 - 2023 Racial Profiling Annual Reportahcitycouncil
 
PMAI PM24 International Conference Program Schedule
PMAI PM24 International Conference Program SchedulePMAI PM24 International Conference Program Schedule
PMAI PM24 International Conference Program Schedulenissamant
 
Vertical Integration Webinar Presentation - NAPGN.pptx
Vertical Integration Webinar Presentation - NAPGN.pptxVertical Integration Webinar Presentation - NAPGN.pptx
Vertical Integration Webinar Presentation - NAPGN.pptxNAP Global Network
 
MPA Lecture on Stakeholder Analysis.pptx
MPA Lecture on Stakeholder Analysis.pptxMPA Lecture on Stakeholder Analysis.pptx
MPA Lecture on Stakeholder Analysis.pptxJo Balucanag - Bitonio
 
PPT Item # 5 - 2024 SMP Agmt Freese & Nichols
PPT Item # 5 - 2024 SMP Agmt Freese & NicholsPPT Item # 5 - 2024 SMP Agmt Freese & Nichols
PPT Item # 5 - 2024 SMP Agmt Freese & Nicholsahcitycouncil
 
Item # 4 - Community Improvement Grant Awards
Item # 4 - Community Improvement Grant AwardsItem # 4 - Community Improvement Grant Awards
Item # 4 - Community Improvement Grant Awardsahcitycouncil
 
Contributi dei parlamentari del PD - Contributi L. 3/2019
Contributi dei parlamentari del PD - Contributi L. 3/2019Contributi dei parlamentari del PD - Contributi L. 3/2019
Contributi dei parlamentari del PD - Contributi L. 3/2019Partito democratico
 

Recently uploaded (20)

ORAU Story 2023 (Annual Report of Accomplishments)
ORAU Story 2023 (Annual Report of Accomplishments)ORAU Story 2023 (Annual Report of Accomplishments)
ORAU Story 2023 (Annual Report of Accomplishments)
 
Beyond COP28 (Extract from Agenda2024 Publication)
Beyond COP28 (Extract from Agenda2024 Publication)Beyond COP28 (Extract from Agenda2024 Publication)
Beyond COP28 (Extract from Agenda2024 Publication)
 
Presentation of the European Youth Foundation
Presentation of the European Youth FoundationPresentation of the European Youth Foundation
Presentation of the European Youth Foundation
 
Item # 6 - Municipal Court Appointments.
Item # 6 - Municipal Court Appointments.Item # 6 - Municipal Court Appointments.
Item # 6 - Municipal Court Appointments.
 
PPT ITem # 10 - 1st Qtr Financial & Inv. Report
PPT ITem # 10 - 1st Qtr Financial & Inv. ReportPPT ITem # 10 - 1st Qtr Financial & Inv. Report
PPT ITem # 10 - 1st Qtr Financial & Inv. Report
 
PPT Item # 2 -- Announcements Powerpoint
PPT Item # 2 -- Announcements PowerpointPPT Item # 2 -- Announcements Powerpoint
PPT Item # 2 -- Announcements Powerpoint
 
IIED's environmental sustainability impact report 2022/23
IIED's environmental sustainability impact report 2022/23IIED's environmental sustainability impact report 2022/23
IIED's environmental sustainability impact report 2022/23
 
Tom Tresser "Civics 101" Intrdouction - 2/24
Tom Tresser "Civics 101" Intrdouction - 2/24Tom Tresser "Civics 101" Intrdouction - 2/24
Tom Tresser "Civics 101" Intrdouction - 2/24
 
Tax cuts today, spending cuts tomorrow? How the Budget might shape the Genera...
Tax cuts today, spending cuts tomorrow? How the Budget might shape the Genera...Tax cuts today, spending cuts tomorrow? How the Budget might shape the Genera...
Tax cuts today, spending cuts tomorrow? How the Budget might shape the Genera...
 
UN Summit of the Future: Draft Outcome Document
UN Summit of the Future: Draft Outcome DocumentUN Summit of the Future: Draft Outcome Document
UN Summit of the Future: Draft Outcome Document
 
PPT Item # 6 - Municipal Court Appointments
PPT Item # 6 - Municipal Court AppointmentsPPT Item # 6 - Municipal Court Appointments
PPT Item # 6 - Municipal Court Appointments
 
IEF Energy Outlooks Comparison Report-2024
IEF Energy Outlooks Comparison Report-2024IEF Energy Outlooks Comparison Report-2024
IEF Energy Outlooks Comparison Report-2024
 
United Nations Global Compact Network Georgia 2023 Value Propistion_ENG.pdf
United Nations Global Compact Network Georgia 2023 Value Propistion_ENG.pdfUnited Nations Global Compact Network Georgia 2023 Value Propistion_ENG.pdf
United Nations Global Compact Network Georgia 2023 Value Propistion_ENG.pdf
 
PPT Item # 9 - 2023 Racial Profiling Annual Report
PPT Item # 9 - 2023 Racial Profiling Annual ReportPPT Item # 9 - 2023 Racial Profiling Annual Report
PPT Item # 9 - 2023 Racial Profiling Annual Report
 
PMAI PM24 International Conference Program Schedule
PMAI PM24 International Conference Program SchedulePMAI PM24 International Conference Program Schedule
PMAI PM24 International Conference Program Schedule
 
Vertical Integration Webinar Presentation - NAPGN.pptx
Vertical Integration Webinar Presentation - NAPGN.pptxVertical Integration Webinar Presentation - NAPGN.pptx
Vertical Integration Webinar Presentation - NAPGN.pptx
 
MPA Lecture on Stakeholder Analysis.pptx
MPA Lecture on Stakeholder Analysis.pptxMPA Lecture on Stakeholder Analysis.pptx
MPA Lecture on Stakeholder Analysis.pptx
 
PPT Item # 5 - 2024 SMP Agmt Freese & Nichols
PPT Item # 5 - 2024 SMP Agmt Freese & NicholsPPT Item # 5 - 2024 SMP Agmt Freese & Nichols
PPT Item # 5 - 2024 SMP Agmt Freese & Nichols
 
Item # 4 - Community Improvement Grant Awards
Item # 4 - Community Improvement Grant AwardsItem # 4 - Community Improvement Grant Awards
Item # 4 - Community Improvement Grant Awards
 
Contributi dei parlamentari del PD - Contributi L. 3/2019
Contributi dei parlamentari del PD - Contributi L. 3/2019Contributi dei parlamentari del PD - Contributi L. 3/2019
Contributi dei parlamentari del PD - Contributi L. 3/2019
 

Arrow Adoption Training for Kinship Families

  • 2. Learning Goals and Objectives  Separation, Attachment, Grief, and Loss  The Role of CPS and the child’s DFPS CPS Case Worker  The Role of Arrow and Arrow’s Case Manager  Special Needs Adoption  Transracial and Cross-Cultural Adoptions  Disruption/Dissolution and Ways to Prevent it  Community Resources, Post Adoption Services, and Tax Credit
  • 3. A bit about Arrow…  Each year, Arrow’s programs serve over 4,000 children and families!  #TogetherKidsWin  Since 1992, Arrow has been fighting the effects of child abuse by helping kids heal from the past, and strengthening families to break the cycle of abuse and neglect
  • 4. Kinship Foster Care  What is Kinship?  Why is Kinship a preferred placement for children in care?
  • 5. “Children are a gift of the Lord...like arrows in the hand of a warrior so are the children of one’s youth.” PSALM 127:3-4
  • 6. Separation, Attachment, Grief, and Loss This Photo by Unknown Author is licensed under CC BY-NC-ND
  • 7. What comes to mind when you hear the words separation, loss, and grief?
  • 9. Definitions  Denial  Anger  Bargaining  Despair  Acceptance
  • 11. Signs of Grief Normal / Common Signs of Grief Younger Children / School Age Complicated Grief Signs
  • 12. A Few Grieving Patterns by Age
  • 13. How A Child’s Developmental Level will Affect their Response to Grief and Loss
  • 14. Grief Through Different Cultures Consider the following questions as you seek support and understanding of a person with a different cultural background:  What emotions and behaviors are normal grief responses within the person’s own cultural?  What special days or dates will be significant?  What types of verbal or written condolences are expressed?
  • 15. The Role of CPS and the DFPS Case Worker
  • 16. The Role of DFPS  The Texas Department of Family and Protective Services (DFPS) works with communities to promote safe and healthy families and protect children and vulnerable adults from abuse, neglect, and exploitation. They do this through investigations, services and referrals, and prevention programs.
  • 17. General CPS Case Worker Duties  Over the course of a child’s placement with a caregiver, the child’s caseworker must:  ensure that the caregiver has up-to-date information about the child;  ensure that the caregiver has the child’s education portfolio;  ask the caregiver to help develop and implement the child’s service plan;  give the caregiver copies of the  placement transfer summary;  Child’s Plan of Service;  education portfolio;  IMPACT form, Medical and Developmental History and Physical Examination;  medical records; and  medical log. When the caseworker gives the child’s caregiver the medical log from IMPACT, the worker must ask the caregiver to:  update the form each time the child receives medical services; and  give the worker an updated copy before each service plan review;
  • 18. General CPS Case Worker Duties  identify in the Child’s Plan of Service any support services that the caregiver must receive to meet the child’s needs, and (within the limits of available resources) ensure that the caregiver receives those services;  help and encourage the caregiver to participate as a team member in planning for, delivering services to, and evaluating the progress of the child;  give 10-day written notification of Chapter 263 court review hearings, as required by law, so that the caregiver can plan to attend and present testimony, if desired;  give appropriate notification of permanency planning meetings so that the caregiver can plan to attend and be heard, if desired;  give appropriate notification of any other reviews held with respect to the child, so that the caregiver can plan to attend and be heard, if desired;  make monthly contact with the caregiver, at least by phone;
  • 19. General CPS Case Worker Duties  visit the child and the caregiver at the caregiver’s home or facility in a majority of the monthly visits with the child;  during monthly contact, discuss the caregiver’s specific concerns about the child’s care, such as the child’s relationship with the caregiver’s family, changes in the composition or functioning of the caregiver’s family, problems with DFPS policies, and so on. Identify any follow-up support services that may be needed;  respond to requests for information;  help the caregiver find ways to manage the child’s behavior;  assess the caregiver’s ability to respond to and meet the child’s needs;  assess the caregiver’s need for services to support the placement; and  provide any follow-up support services that are requested or needed.
  • 20. The Role of Arrow and Arrow’s Case Manager
  • 21. The Role of Arrow in the Life of Children and Caregivers Arrow Child & Family Ministries serves children entering foster care by recruiting, training, licensing and supporting foster families as they provide therapeutic services from a Christian worldview. The goal is to transition these children back into a healthy environment with their biological families. Or, if that is not possible, provide a safe, nurturing home from which they can launch into a successful adulthood.
  • 22. The Role of an Arrow Case Manager  Provides case management services to children and families  Facilitates placement of children in foster and adoptive homes.  Participates in development of assessment, service delivery, discharge, and aftercare planning.  Assists and monitors families in the compliance of licensing/regulatory standards.  Implements Pre-Admission Assessment and Individual Treatment Plans in conjunction with foster parents and clients, as well as other professionals involved in the case within applicable standard and submit for supervisory approval.  Provide consultation for foster parents, adoptive parents, biological parents, respite provider, childcare staff, and other caregivers, as indicated.  Maintain accurate, timely, and complete case notes, billing documentation, treatment plans, progress notes and other documentation according to licensing, accreditation and ministry standards.  Attends trainings and meetings.
  • 23. The Role of an Arrow Case Manager  Participates in case planning conferences, Professional Consulting Team, School meetings, court hearings, staffing, etc., as appropriate.  Maintains regular contact with family and child and monitors psychological, mental, emotional, physical, and environmental well-being through phone contacts, email, and home visits.  Helps families develop a therapeutic milieu conducive to healthy child development. Delivers direct therapeutic intervention to child and family.  Provides crisis intervention as needed to prevent escalation of high-risk behavior, relapse, hospitalization, placement disruption, and other negative outcomes on a 24-hour on-call basis.  Consults with medical doctors and other specialists, and/or treatment team members concerning treatment plans and amends plans as needed.  Inputs and updates child and family information into the Arrow client information system.  Maintain child and/or family records in Arrow’s electronic client information system utilizing assigned Arrow technology resources. These resources may include, but are not limited to: desktop computers, laptop computers, touchscreen devices, and scanners.  Conducts quarterly evaluations, creates corrective action plans and monitors foster homes.
  • 25. Transracial and Cross-Cultural Adoption Transracial or cross-cultural adoption means placing a child who is of one race or ethnic group with adoptive parents of another race or ethnic group.
  • 26. Suggestions for a Successful Transracial Adoption  According to Adopt US Kids there are key things to put into action with a transracial or cross-cultural adoption:  Find mentors and role models for your child Because you are their parent, your child will turn to you for guidance in many areas. But there may be questions related to their race and culture that you cannot answer and problems you simply cannot understand. Involving adults in your child’s life who share their culture will give them valuable role models and allies. Also, surround your child with positive images and stories of people from a variety of racial and ethnic backgrounds, including their own.
  • 27.  Make new connections in your community Adopting a child of a different race or culture is an opportunity to explore new resources and get involved with organizations in your community.  Enroll your child in a diverse school.  Join community groups dedicated to racial or social justice.  Participate in a faith community that reflects your adopted child’s heritage.  Seek out cultural events, but be sure that your involvement does not end with attending an annual celebration. Suggestions for a Successful Transracial Adoption
  • 28.  Keep Children Talking! Find opportunities to bring up topics of race and culture in everyday life. Do not wait for your child to introduce the topic. The news, popular media, music, art, and books all offer platforms for discussing race, culture, assumptions, and diversity. Encouraging honest conversations will help create an environment where your child feels safe to explore their heritage. Suggestions for a Successful Transracial Adoption
  • 29.  Acknowledge Racism Part of adopting a child of another background can be helping them cope with and respond to racism. As a parent of a different race or culture from your child, you may have to educate yourself before you can help your child navigate the complicated racial landscape of our country. You can read more about understanding racism and find five tips to help adoptive parents address racial trauma in the blog post published by Psychology@Pepperdine University. Suggestions for a Successful Transracial Adoption
  • 30.  Embrace new traditions In addition to celebrating your child’s traditions and the traditions of their heritage, celebrate those of other cultures. Your child will learn to value and respect diversity and see that you value the positive contributions that people of all cultures make to society. Suggestions for a Successful Transracial Adoption
  • 31. This Photo by Unknown Author is licensed under CC BY-SA Special Needs Adoption and Benefits
  • 32. Special Needs Adoption Criteria The child must be younger than 18 years old and meet one of the following criteria when the adoptive placement agreement is signed: 1.The child is at least six years old; 2.the child is at least two years old and a member of a racial or ethnic group that exits foster care at a slower pace than other racial or ethnic groups; 3.the child is being adopted with a sibling or to join a sibling; or 4.The child has a verifiable physical, mental, or emotional disabling condition, as established by an appropriately qualified professional through a diagnosis that addresses: (a) what the condition is; and (b) that the condition is disabling.
  • 33. State Adoption Assistance Requirements The following six requirements must be met for a child to be eligible for state adoption assistance: 1. The child must not be eligible for Title IV-E adoption assistance. 2. The child must qualify as "special needs," as described in the previous slide at the time the adoptive placement agreement is signed. 3. Reasonable efforts must have been made to place the child without adoption assistance, except when to do so was contrary to the child's best interest. 4. The child must be placed in an approved adoptive placement with DFPS as the child's managing conservator. For both relative and non-relative placements, the adoptive home must meet all of the requirements for approval under licensing minimum standards, including criminal records checks. 5. The child's resources must be less than $10,000. 6. The adoption assistance agreement must be signed before the adoption is consummated.
  • 34. Program Benefits  Medicaid health care coverage for the adopted child. This benefit assists with the child's medical and dental care, eye care, durable medical equipment and supplies, psychiatric/behavioral health care, and medical transportation.  Reimbursement for certain one-time expenses relating to completing the adoption process (non-recurring adoption expenses). This benefit provides reimbursement up to $1,200 per adoption for reasonable and necessary adoption expenses directly related to completing the adoption process. These expenses may include fees paid directly to child placing agencies as well as court costs, attorney fees, and other fees directly related to the legal completion of the adoption.
  • 35. Program Benefits  Monthly payments to assist with the child's needs. The monthly adoption assistance payments are determined based upon the child's special needs and the adoptive family's circumstances. Assistance is considered for the following types of special needs:  Exceptional initial placement expenses.  Special maintenance.  Childcare.  Supportive educational needs.  Maintaining sibling/other family contact.  Routine maintenance when needed.
  • 36. Program Benefits Payment Ceilings for Adoption Assistance  The payment ceilings are established by the DFPS Board and are based upon two separate amounts. For children whose service level is Basic at the time of adoptive placement the ceiling is $400 per month. For children whose service level is Moderate or higher, the payment ceiling is $545 per month. The payment ceilings cannot be exceeded and are not automatically provided to any child.
  • 37. Adoption Disruption and Dissolution
  • 38. What does Disruption and Dissolution Mean? Adoption Disruption - The term disruption is used to describe an adoption process that ends after the child is placed in an adoptive home and before the adoption is legally finalized, resulting in the child's return to (or entry into) foster care or placement with new adoptive parents. Adoption Dissolution - The term dissolution is generally used to describe an adoption in which the legal relationship between the adoptive parents and adoptive child is severed, either voluntarily or involuntarily, after the adoption is legally finalized.
  • 39. Indicators for Adoption Disruption  High expectations of the adoptive child  Parents want child to meet their emotional needs  Parents scapegoating the child - child is blamed for all problems, fearful of child, unfounded fears about the child, favoritism among children  Parents threaten child’s placement openly  Parents identify their own past abuse with child
  • 40. Ways to Support and Prevent Disruption or Dissolution  adoption assistance that meets the child/youth’s needs  consistent, affordable access to all needed services, including a social worker or post-adoption service worker, parent support groups, training on adoption and special needs, medical care, respite care, etc.  access to affordable, effective in-home family therapy, other mental health services, and temporary out-of-home mental health treatment  support in maintaining any connections to birth family members (including siblings) and past caregivers and others important to the child/youth  crisis intervention services
  • 41. Arrow’s Behavioral Health Services  Arrow’s primary objective is to come alongside caregivers and children to help fill their toolbox with new, highly adaptive coping skills. We refer to these as “cognitive” coping skills. Children often behave the way they do because they don’t know how to respond any other way. Our Behavioral Support Specialists’ efforts are to help children both learn and follow new, specific, cognitive steps that allow them to get their needs met without resorting to the use of familiar maladaptive emotionally driven coping skills.  There is no cost to participants or their families as long as they qualify for services under the Texas Medicaid Program with Superior HealthPlan.  A Referral can be made through Arrow’s Website at arrow.org
  • 42. Community Resources, Post Adoption Services, and Adoption Tax Credit
  • 43. Post Adoption Services  Post Adoption Services help the adoptive family and adoptee after the adoption has been finalized  Post Adoption Services available include:  Case Management or service planning;  Support groups;  Parent training;  Post adoption counseling, including day treatment services;  Respite care; and  Residential treatment services.  Agencies providing Post Adoption services in your region are listed on the DFPS website. https://www.dfps.state.tx.us/Child_Protection/Adoption/adoption_support.asp
  • 44. Adoption Tax Credit  For adoptions finalized in 2023 (tax returns claimed in 2024), the maximum amount a family can receive as credit is $15,950 per adopted child. For adoptions finalized in 2022 (tax returns claimed in 2023), the maximum amount a family can receive as credit is $14,890 per adopted child. Going forward, the amount of the credit will slightly increase each year because it is based upon a “cost of living” calculation. The numbers that define the lower and upper limits of income eligibility also will fluctuate since they are based upon current cost of living.  To take the full benefit of the adoption tax credit, we recommend that you consult with a tax professional who will help you determine the extent of the tax credit available to you.
  • 45. Resources for this Curriculum  CPS Handbook - http://www.dfps.state.tx.us/handbooks/CPS/Menu/MenuCPS6000.asp  DFPS Website - https://www.dfps.texas.gov/Child_Protection/Adoption/adoption_assistance.asp  Adopt US Kids - https://www.adoptuskids.org

Editor's Notes

  1. Welcome to Arrow Child and Family Ministries Pre-Service Training. We are so thankful that you are here with us. During our time together we plan to help you learn more about us and look forward to getting to know you better as well. My name is Leah Wilson and I am the Director of Kinship here at Arrow. We have created this training specifically for our kinship families who are wanting to adopt the kinship children in their home. This means that you are either currently caring for or seeking to care for a child whom you have a prior or existing connection to whether that’s through a family connection, family friend, neighbor, teaching or maybe a child is being placed with you as fictive kin because you have adopted or fostered their sibling. If you are coming to Arrow to foster or adopt a child in general that you have no connection to then this training may not apply to you, please reach out to your assigned recruiter or foster home developer if you are unsure about whether you need to complete this training.
  2. As we begin to dive in here today…the first thing I would like to do is share a few of the goals for this meeting. GO THROUGH BULLET POINTS
  3. Arrow was founded in 1992 by a man who grew up in a loving, Christian foster home. His experience wasn’t the best in the beginning…he was moved from foster home to foster home and life was very challenging…to say the least. It wasn’t until he came into his final foster home that his experience changed. It was a Christian foster home…and from his experience and life there…grew a desire to create more opportunities and experiences like his for children in foster care.  In order to fulfill our founders goals we embrace our mission with a goal of “Helping Kids, Strengthening Families”…Our kids come to us from very hard places and their backgrounds all look different, there is no cookie cutter approach to foster care…and we’re committed to individualized care that best meets the needs of each foster kid.  During his time in that Christian foster home he was prayed over…and one scripture that was specifically prayed over him was Psalm 127:4…“Children are a gift of the Lord, like arrows in the hand of a warrior.” It’s where our name comes from and you’ll find this scripture pretty much everywhere you see anything associated with Arrow. It’s our privilege to step in at the time of crisis and provide safe and loving homes for kids when they desperately need it…and it’s our desire to be the preferred Christian provider in Texas. We currently have 11 offices in Texas and can serve the communities within 150 miles of each. Our offices are located in Amarillo (serving Lubbock), Austin, Beaumont, Brownwood, DFW (Grand Prairie), North Houston (Spring), McAllen, San Antonio, South Houston (Sugarland), Tyler, and Waco. Our Corporate office is located in the Houston area and houses a lot of the folks that play a huge role in the behind the scenes to make our everyday a success. 
  4. SAY: What Is Kinship Care? For generations, extended families have played significant roles in raising youth when parents are having a difficult time. This is called Kinship Care by youth Protective Services (CPS). Relatives and other people who the youth or family have a significant relationship can often provide youth with stability when they can't live with their birth parents. Texas has been leading the way in prioritizing placing children and youth in kinship placements. The most recent data shows Texas placing 44.5% percent of children and youth in kinship placements versus 34% which is the national average.  Why is Kinship a preferred placement for children in care? •Provides love and care in a familiar setting; •Provides parents with a sense of hope that youth will remain connected to their birth families; •Enables youth to live with people they know and trust; •Reinforces a youth's sense of cultural identity and positive self-esteem; •Helps a youth make and sustain extended family connections; •Continues lifelong family traditions and memories; •Supports the youth in building healthy relationships within the family; •Supports the youth's need for safety and well-being; and •Creates a sense of stability in the life of a youth.
  5. Billy Graham once said, “Children will invariably talk, eat, walk, think, respond, and act like their parents. Give them a pattern they can see clearly, and you give them something gold and silver cannot buy.” During our founder’s time in the Christian foster home we just spoke about. His foster parents specifically prayed over him Psalm 127:4 “Children are a gift of the Lord, like arrows in the hand of a warrior.” This is where the name of our organization originated, it's our cornerstone Scripture reference, and one of the primary Scriptures you'll see around Arrow. .  As children grow, their lives are being shaped by their experiences. Whether you are their biological parent or foster parent, the impact you have on their future is immeasurable. Long after your influence on their lives has faded, the hopes, dreams and desires planted in their hearts and nourished will be taken with them. These seeds will grow to have a significant impact on their lives and the lives of those they come into contact with.  Your time spent meeting the needs of these children in care will provide a healing and nurturing environment preparing them to move forward in life. You are like an archer sending arrows into the world.
  6. Separation, attachment, grief and loss are common struggles among kids who come from hard places. The following few slides, we will be discussing what Separation, grief and loss might look like and give you some practical tools for helping the children in your home through the path of Separation, Loss and Grief.
  7. -Our society tends to label losses as to which ones are acceptable to grieve over and which ones are not. For example, society might find it more acceptable to grieve over the loss of a marriage through death than divorce, even though they are both losses. Sometimes society even places expectations on how and for how long someone should grieve over a particular loss. However, it is important to note that not everyone grieves the same way. You cannot expect someone to grieve the way you THINK you would grieve in a similar situation. -Many people think that children in care should not grieve, or at least not for long. After all, they were “rescued” from an abusive situation, what do they have to grieve over, right? Wrong. They have just lost everything they know. Furthermore, even if a child has been abused, in most cases they simply want the abuse to stop- not to be separated from their family. -What is loss? One of the broadest definitions of loss is simply “any change.” Any time there is a change in our lives, whether positive or negative, there is a loss associated with it. Think about the following examples: going to college, getting married, etc. So, if any change includes some loss, we want to consider all the changes, and therefore, losses, that are impacting a child being removed from his or her home and placed in foster care. Ask the class: When a child’s pet dies, what are some of the things you say to the child? -Often times a child is told “don’t cry” and/or “we’ll get you another one.” It hurts us to see the child in pain and we just want the child to feel better. Him crying makes us feel bad. In general, we as a society are not comfortable with tears. Unfortunately, though, that child has just been taught two things about how to grieve: Don’t feel your feelings, and just replace your loss. Now imagine that same child as a teenager with his first broken heart. In an effort to comfort him, his dad says to him, “Don’t be upset, son, there are plenty of fish in the sea.” His lessons about how to grieve have just been reinforced: it’s not okay to feel your feelings and just replace your loss with something new. -Unfortunately, this is not how the Bible would tell us to grieve. According to Scripture, it is okay to feel our feelings. When Lazarus died, the Bible tells us that Jesus wept. Even knowing that He could and would bring Lazarus back to life, Jesus still felt and expressed His grief. If the great God of the Universe can cry, then so can we, and we should certainly encourage grieving children to feel their feelings and not just replace their loss with something else. Go over definitions with class and ask class members to give examples related to separation and loss. Separation: The change that occurs when there is a breakup in a relationship. Parents’ divorce, best friend moves, end of school (loss of teacher), taken into care. Loss: The effect on people when something or someone important is withdrawn. Biological family, house (bedroom, yard, toys, etc.), neighborhood, (kids, rode bike there, pets, etc.) Grief: The process that helps people through the path of separation and loss. Discuss Categories: Expected: Retirement, 40th birthday, kids move from home (planned), loss of hair, etc. Unexpected: Death of loved one, loss of job, removal from your home, change of surroundings, etc.
  8. Our last personal example is one about some of the greatest grief a person could experience yet still trusting God throughout the process. Read: Job was a man in the Old Testament of the Bible who did everything right in the eyes of God. And yet, Job was not exempt from separation, loss, and grief. -In Job 1:1, we read that Job was a man that was “blameless, upright, fearing God and turning away from evil.” What more could be asked for? -It is important to note here, that although children who come to us have done their share of no-no’s, such as sneaking into the cookie jar, there is not a child who comes to us, who deserves the abuse and/or neglect that has been inflicted on them. -In this world, we will always question why those who are innocent must suffer through untold problems and devastation that is not deserved. We will always have problems and heartache to face while we walk this earth. Such is the sinful state of man. There will always be injustice and wrongdoing toward those who don’t deserve it. -Job was a man who went about his daily life living as God would have him live. However, testing times were to come for Job. We don’t understand his testing time, nor did he. But let’s walk this path of loss and grief, trusting God just as Job did.
  9. Now, let’s discuss how some of these characteristics of grieving may look for a child in care going through the grieving process. Denial- downplaying the situation, child continues to believe they will go right home to birth family. Anger- aggressive behaviors, blaming foster parents, etc. Bargaining- child may hope that if he is good enough, or even bad enough they will take him back. Despair- hopelessness, withdrawing behaviors, depression. Acceptance- child becoming more comfortable with current situation. Explain: There are major events in a child in care’s life that cause that child to be very depressed and unhappy because they are away from the familiar things of home. By being aware of what some of these events could be, you can be prepared and take steps to help a child through some of these times.
  10. SAY: It’s important to remember that grief looks different for EVERYONE….this includes the grief cycle too. Just because someone has gone back to a stage they’ve already experienced does not mean that they have regressed or aren’t working through it properly.
  11. Trainer Tell the class: On page 3 of the handout there is a section we will refer to called: Signs of Grief When you see a child exhibiting behaviors, it may be helpful to realize that they could be related to the losses they have experienced. Behaviors that may include hitting, yelling, telling foster parents they hate them, not doing what is told, defiant, throwing things, school issues with work or not obeying the rules are all signs of grief in children. When a foster parent gives notice to have a child moved from their home, we are complicating their loss even more. Please remember that this behavior can be normal, and as foster parents, we are expected to be the people who guide and support them through every stage of grief as if they were our own children. We will touch more on removal later on.
  12. Trainer Tell the class: On page 4-6 of the handout there is a list of grieving patterns by age. These are important to pay attention to in order to see the need behind the behavior. Major Differences of Child and Adult Grief: * Adults have the capacity to recognize that they are grieving. Children up to 10 often have no understanding of the feelings they are experiencing. * Adults feel an immediate intensity of loss and can experience grief for long periods of time. Children have a very short attention span and can experience brief grief reactions throughout the day. * Adults can take 2-5 years to resolve their grief and integrate the loss. Children can review and reevaluate the loss at each new stage of development. * Adults focus primarily on processing the details and trying to make sense out of death. The ask the question why? Children focus primarily on 3 basic questions if they mention them or not, “Did I cause this to happen?”, “Will it happen again?”, and “Who will take care of me now?” Remember, you as parents have more power than you realize. You can’t control what has happened to them or take away their pain, but you can teach them the coping skills they need to work through their grief, and with your support, they can begin to heal. Parenting a child with trauma does not mean we offer them an excuse or validation for difficult behavior; however, it is an understanding that this behavior is a form of expression in the only way they might know how. Expression of their needs, feelings, and their past.
  13. Infancy A child’s major developmental task during infancy is establishing trust. When an infant experiences the profound loss of a parent or primary caregiver, the infant is at risk of losing his or her basic sense of trust in adults, and the world at large. Specific grief and loss related behaviors include crying loudly, withdrawal, apathy, and mournful crying. Foster parents can help reduce an infant’s experience of loss by maintaining the infant’s routines (as best as possible). Infants also find comfort in familiar smells—although sometimes it goes against our instincts not to wash all of the infant’s belongings, it gives the infant a sense of security to keep something that smells of the infant’s home. Preschool: Two Years to Five Years of Age At this age, children have not developed logical thinking abilities, and do not understand cause, effect, or permanence. Children of this age who experience loss may feel sadness, hopelessness, denial, and guilt. The fear of further loss may make the child clingy, anxious, and stubborn. You may see signs such as being Loud, angry, tearful demanding behaviors, defecation outside of the toilet, smearing feces, eating too much or not eating much, sadness, refuse to obey, defiant, test boundaries of caregivers, indifferent to separation, depression. In general, children at this age have no control over their grief reactions which will almost always be expressed overtly. Foster parents can help reduce the stress of loss by answering the child’s questions honestly, providing loving, stable interactions, and patiently attempting to connect with the child. School Age: Six Years to Eleven Years of Age During this period, children are developing their ability to understand cause, effect, and time. They are beginning to form concrete and logical thoughts. Grief will show itself in school or learning problems, and pre-occupation with the loss of caregivers and or related worries. You may see signs such as denial, difficulty in showing true feelings, tantrums, anger, defiant behaviors, test boundaries of caregivers, difficulty at school or doing homework. They may be defensive to protect their feelings or come up with their own reasons as to why they are with you. They must be encouraged over and over again to talk about the loss and express their deep inner feelings in order to allow mourning to result in a positive outcome. Children at this age need permission to grieve by the adults in their lives. Foster parents should be available, sympathetic listeners and help teachers and other significant adults understand that the child’s behavior and performance is related to his or her overwhelming sadness. Adolescence: Twelve Years to Nineteen Years of Age At this stage, children understand permanence and will grieve like an adult, following the five stages of grief (Shock/Denial, Anger/Protest, Bargaining, Depression, Acceptance). Complicating the grief process, is the adolescent’s primary developmental task- forming his or her own identity. Issues of independence, resistance, and separation are already occurring—profound loss adds a tremendous amount of stress to his or her maturation process. When faced with loss, adolescents can turn to destructive behaviors such as substance abuse, eating disorders, or struggle with depression. At this age you may see signs of withdrawal, resistance, regression, acting out, or mood swings. It can be difficult for them to ask for support while asserting independence and they may want to be with friends more than family for support. In some instances, teenagers will gravitate to their online community for support and connectedness. This behavior is a normal reaction! Foster parents can help adolescents deal with their conflicting emotions by helping them maintain their sense of identity, allowing them to make choices (that are not harmful), and by encouraging safe expressions and experiences of freedom and independence. Source: Grief & Loss in Foster Children • Youth Dynamics | Mental Health Care for Montana Kids
  14. Read: There is no correct way to grieve. It may be difficult to know how to be sensitive to a grieving person from a different culture background. As a foster parent you want to make sure you are reminding the child you are there for them. You should consider talking with someone who shares that cultural background or search for information on the internet to learn more about the customs and mourning practices of another person from another cultural. We must remember that each cultural has its own rituals that influence the expression of grief. Carrying out these practices offers a sense of stability and security. As you help the children in your home walk through loss and grief, it’s important to remember that Children in care are often in a state of “limbo.” When initially placed into care, it is often unknown whether the child will or will not return home. Until a birth parent’s rights are relinquished or terminated, it is difficult for a child to complete the grief process. Foster parents who are providing care during this time of limbo need to help children maintain attachments with their caregivers. Continual contact between birth parents and the child (even if it is not face-to-face) is recommended. Through contact and visits, the child’s family can reassure the child he or she is safe and loved. When separation from the birth family is permanent, it is the foster parents’ responsibility—along with the social worker—to help the child feel safe, secure, and prepared for the future. Honest, developmentally appropriate communication is essential. Social workers and foster parents need to work closely together to develop a plan to help the child grieve and adapt during this transitional time between permanent homes.
  15. Thanks Bri, I’ll be guiding through the duration of the adoption training. Our next topic is the role of the CPS and DFPS Case Worker. As a kinship caregiver you have probably worked with several CPS employees – from the CPS investigator who orchestrated the removed and initial placement of the child in your home, to the CPS Conservatorship or CVS worker who worked with you and the family throughout the case, your CPS Kinship Worker who is the advocated for your family, and finally the CPS adoption prep worker who is preparing the file for adoption.
  16. As you being this final part of your journey towards permanency, it’s important to understand what role arrow will play in your life and the responsibilities of Arrow’s Case Manager.
  17. As a kinship caregiver you are likely to have the most knowledge about your kinship placements race, religion, ethnicity, and the make up of their family history. The following slide are some helpful tips to remember if you are adopting a child in transracial or cross-cultural adoption.
  18. When planning to adopt, many people say that the child’s race or ethnicity does not matter. Parents mean this in the best possible way. They mean that they could love a child unconditionally, regardless of whether they look like them or share their cultural heritage and traditions. But race and culture do matter—especially to children who have already lost so much. Losing connections to their culture and racial heritage—or being raised in households where their importance is not acknowledged—can affect children throughout their lives. Learning about and respecting a child’s culture—and finding ways to maintain their connections to it—are critical components to helping an adopted child thrive. Adoptive families and child welfare professionals provide the following advice on transracial adoption.
  19. As a kinship caregiver adopting a child through the State child welfare system, you are eligible for adoption assistance and benefits. The following slides will discuss the criteria to qualify for these benefits, as outlined by DFPS.
  20. As a kinship caregiver, we know you are committed to the long-term care and wellbeing of your kinship placement. The following slides are tips to prevent an adoption disruption or dissolution.
  21. As a kinship caregiver, you have access to community resources, post adoption services and an adoption tax credit following the finalization of your adoption.