Introducing IIHS 2012

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An overview of the Indian Institute for Human Settlements (IIHS) India's prospective Research & Innovation University focused on its urbanisation

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Introducing IIHS 2012

  1. 1. South Asia’s Urban Transformation iihsturning Challenge into Opportunitywww.iihs.co.in
  2. 2. The challenge of contemporary Indian cities:integration of the pre-colonial, colonial, ‘modern’ & informal
  3. 3. Our future hinges on the state of Indian cities
  4. 4. The Dynamics of Indian Urbanisation (1951-2031)
  5. 5. 1951 Tibet W. Pakistan Nepal E. Pakistan India Population Size (millions) < 0.1 0.1 – 0.5 0.5 - 1 1-5 >5Source: Census of India, 1971- 2001 UN, 2007 IIHS analysis, 2009-10
  6. 6. 800 2011 Population (in millions) 700 600 500 400 300 200 100 0 1951 1961 1971 1981 1991 2001 2011 2021 2031 Delhi Urban Population Growth (16.9) Ahmadabad (5.7) Kolkata (15.5) Mumbai (20) Hyderabad (6.7) Population Size Pune (millions) (5.0) 800 < 0.1 700 Urban Settlements 0.1 – 0.5 600 0.5 - 1 500 Bangalore 400 1-5 (7.2) 300 Chennai 200 >5 (7.5) 100 0 1951 1961 1971 1981 1991 2001 2011 2021 2031Source: Census of India, 1971- 2001 UN, 2007 IIHS analysis, 2009-10 Large Urban Settlement Growth
  7. 7. 800 2031 Population (in millions) 700 600 500 400 300 200 100 0 1951 1961 1971 1981 1991 2001 2011 2021 2031 Delhi Kanpur Urban Population Growth (24.4) (5.1) Ahmadabad (8.5) Kolkata Surat (22.3) (6.3) Mumbai (28.6) Hyderabad (9.9) Population Size Pune (millions) (7.4) 800 < 0.1 700 Urban Settlements 0.1 – 0.5 600 0.5 - 1 500 Bangalore 400 1-5 (10.6) 300 Chennai 200 >5 (11.1) 100 0 1951 1961 1971 1981 1991 2001 2011 2021 2031Source: Census of India, 1971-2001 UN, 2007 IIHS analysis, 2009-10 Large Urban Settlement Growth
  8. 8. Growth of Indias Urban Economy (1991-2031) 300 250Rs.Trillion / lakh crores 200 150 100 50 Rs. 1450 lakh crores Rs 735 lakh crores - 1991 2001 2011 2021 2031 Time (years) GDP (current prices) Urban GDP
  9. 9. Who manages Urban India?Top Management• MPs & MLAs 5,300• Higher Judiciary 650• IAS & IPS 8,200• CXOs (top 500 corporates) ~ 5,000• NGO leadership ~ 1,750Total 20,900% educated & trained in urban practice < 5%Middle Management• Senior Municipal officials ~ 4,000• Senior Engineers ~ 8,000• Urban Planners ~ 2,000Total ~ 14,000% educated & trained in urban practice < 20%
  10. 10. India’s Urban Future (2011-2031)• India will add at least 300 million new people to its cities in 30 years• This is on top of the current urban population of ~300 million, of whom over 70 million are poor• In 2031, three of the ten largest megacities in the world will be in India: Delhi, Mumbai, Kolkata• Over 70 other cities will have a population of over 1 million• This will be the second largest urbanisation in human history creating huge market opportunities and development challenges• The only option to avoid complete urban breakdown is the simultaneous transformation of India’s cities and its villages• The key to this the education of a new generation of changemakers and entrepreneurs and building the capacities and motivation of current working professionals
  11. 11. Limited Supply of Professionalscapable of managing this transition
  12. 12. Education of Urban Planners in India• India has ~ 4,000 qualified planners• It educates only ~350 new planners each year in a narrow manner• Of this only a fraction enter into public planning practice• Most have skills unequal to the complex systemic challenges they face• With close to 5,000 urban centres, this implies a huge deficit in the number of planners the country needs• Hence, some of the largest Municipalities in the country e.g. Mumbai have no qualified planners on their rolls
  13. 13. Why Planning is not enough?• The fundamental constraint to the orderly growth and transformation of urban India is – no longer capital – nor perhaps technology – the availability of sufficient numbers of well educated professionals committed to the common good who can play the role of changemakers and entrepreneurs.• India’s higher education system has no inter-disciplinary programme of scale to educate enough professionals for the satisfactory planning, development and management of India’s cities, towns and villages.
  14. 14. The Response
  15. 15. iihs India’s first independentNational Research & Innovation University focused on urban transformation www.iihs.co.in
  16. 16. Why the IIHS ?• Assumption: India will and can change in dramatic ways by the 2030s to enable inclusive economic growth, end poverty, improve human development and quality of life, enable greater equity and sustainability• Locus of much of this change: 300 – 400 cities and towns and their surrounding countryside
  17. 17. Goal: catalysing five national outcomes by the 2030s Inclusive Economic Growth Reduced Poverty and Inequality Social Transformation Environmental Sustainability Unified & Robust Polity
  18. 18. 1,00,000 new interdisciplinary professionals by 2031• An ‘MBA equivalent’ to coordinate and complement specialist professions and turn around urban management, development, renewal & planning; coordinate and complement specialist professions: technology, management, design, law – Bachelors of Urban Practice (BUP) – Masters of Urban Practice (MUP) – PhD in Urban Practice
  19. 19. IIHS Goal• The IIHS is a national institution committed to the equitable, sustainable and efficient transformation of Indian settlements• The IIHS aspires to be a globally-ranked, action- oriented, unique education and research institution of international stature
  20. 20. IIHS Core Concept National Scale + Interdisciplinary Excellence + Economic & Social Inclusion =1,00,000 professionals (Urban Practitioners) in 20 years + Innovative Institutional design & revenue model + National Regulation = Transformative National Institution
  21. 21. The Promoter Group • Aromar Revi • Nandan Nilekani • Bansi Mehta • Nasser Munjee • Chandrashekar B. Bhave • Rahul Mehrotra • Cyrus Guzder • Rakesh Mohan • Deepak Parekh • Renana Jhabvala • Deepak Satwalekar • Shirish Patel • Jamshyd Godrej • Vijay Kelkar • Keshub Mahindra • Xerxes Desai • Kishore Mariwala Some of India’s leading entrepreneurs, practitioners, public intellectuals & administrators helped create & manage the IIHSiihs
  22. 22. Five IIHS Programmes IIHS Programmes Research & Working Consulting Academic Distance & Innovation Professionals & Advisory e-learning servicesThe IIHS aspires to be a globally-ranked, action-oriented, unique education and research institution of international stature
  23. 23. IIHS Academic Programme
  24. 24. Interdisciplinary Curriculum A broad interdisciplinary curriculum that bridges Social Design Sciences Law & Technology Governance Interdisciplinary EnvironmentalManagement Curriculum Sciences (multilingual)
  25. 25. Linking research, teaching & practice at IIHS Case studies Research Teaching Practice Education forGenerates Material Working Professionalsfor Teaching
  26. 26. IIHS degrees and expected chronology of Initiation• Masters in Urban Practice (MUP) - 2 years 2012• PhD in Urban Practice - 2+2 years 2013• Bachelors in Urban Practice (BUP) - 4 years 2014/15• Integrated MUP (IMUP) - 4+1 years 2016
  27. 27. Employment Opportunities for Students
  28. 28. Potential Employers of IIHS students• Public Sector Enterprises: municipalities and urban local bodies, state and national governments, regulators, public utilities and public enterprises• Private Sector Enterprises: housing, construction, infrastructure, utility, real estate, finance and advisory services, consultancies;• Civil Society Organisations: working on community issues, mobilising collective action, enabling the common good and social inclusion• Universities and Knowledge Enterprises: institutions building South Asia-centric and globally relevant knowledge on human settlements. Quantum Consulting a leading market research agency reports very encouraging responses from students and employers
  29. 29. Programme for Working Professionals
  30. 30. Programme for Working Professionals• Education, training and development needs of public, private and civil society institutions built around various offerings e.g. – Short-term (1-2 week) specialised thematic courses – High level (1-3 day) Strategic management programmes – A mid-career 8 month PG Diploma in Urban Development• These will be delivered in tandem with consulting and advisory services• Erewhon Consulting a leading innovation firm has reported large and unique unfilled niches for IIHS offerings
  31. 31. IIHS Consultancy & Advisory Programme: bringing together some of the world’s leading practitioners
  32. 32. IIHS Global Knowledge Partnership
  33. 33. MITNorthAmericaAcademic
  34. 34. IDEONorthAmerica Practice
  35. 35. UCLEuropeAcademic
  36. 36. ARUPEurope &GlobalPractice
  37. 37. ACCAfricaAcademic& Practice
  38. 38. A global of 180 leading academics, practitioners and policy makers have co-created the MUP curriculum
  39. 39. Faculty & Practitioners
  40. 40. A globally hired interdisciplinary Faculty• A Faculty of over 100 interdisciplinary professionals with active research and practice experience will be hired over 4-6 years• Remunerated bearing in mind national and international levels of compensation• Core curriculum and advisors team established in 2009, active in global consultations and review• National and global search started, with considerable enthusiasm in India and abroad
  41. 41. iihs Research India Urbanisation Atlas V1.1 400 cities and regions around which India will transform
  42. 42. Greater Mumbai
  43. 43. IIHS main campus: Bengaluru
  44. 44. IIHS campus environs: Kengeri, Bengaluru
  45. 45. IIHS City Campus, Bengaluru
  46. 46. IIHS Research Offices, Bengaluru
  47. 47. Signature campus to cost ~Rs. 250 crore55 acres allotted by the Govt. of Karnataka to IIHS
  48. 48. Implementation Timeline
  49. 49. Implementation Timeline 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015Startup ◊Land mobilisation ◊Campus planning & construction ◊ ◊IIHS University incorporation ◊Working Professional education ◊Consulting & AdvisoryMasters (MUP) programme ◊PhD programme ◊Bachelors (BUP) programmeDistance & e-learning programme
  50. 50. Conclusions
  51. 51. Conclusion: Opportunity• India has a tremendous opportunity through its impending urbanisation to pre-emptively address multiple development challenges: 1. Accelerate inclusive economic growth 2. Wealth creation that serves the common good and eliminates abject poverty 3. Catalyse dramatic social transformation 4. Enable a global sustainability transition The IIHS is building an significant Open institutional initiative to enable this …. why not join us to make it possible?

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