Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

of

Introduction - Thomas Harriot Summer Series 2021 Slide 1 Introduction - Thomas Harriot Summer Series 2021 Slide 2 Introduction - Thomas Harriot Summer Series 2021 Slide 3 Introduction - Thomas Harriot Summer Series 2021 Slide 4 Introduction - Thomas Harriot Summer Series 2021 Slide 5 Introduction - Thomas Harriot Summer Series 2021 Slide 6 Introduction - Thomas Harriot Summer Series 2021 Slide 7 Introduction - Thomas Harriot Summer Series 2021 Slide 8 Introduction - Thomas Harriot Summer Series 2021 Slide 9 Introduction - Thomas Harriot Summer Series 2021 Slide 10 Introduction - Thomas Harriot Summer Series 2021 Slide 11 Introduction - Thomas Harriot Summer Series 2021 Slide 12 Introduction - Thomas Harriot Summer Series 2021 Slide 13 Introduction - Thomas Harriot Summer Series 2021 Slide 14 Introduction - Thomas Harriot Summer Series 2021 Slide 15 Introduction - Thomas Harriot Summer Series 2021 Slide 16 Introduction - Thomas Harriot Summer Series 2021 Slide 17 Introduction - Thomas Harriot Summer Series 2021 Slide 18 Introduction - Thomas Harriot Summer Series 2021 Slide 19 Introduction - Thomas Harriot Summer Series 2021 Slide 20 Introduction - Thomas Harriot Summer Series 2021 Slide 21 Introduction - Thomas Harriot Summer Series 2021 Slide 22 Introduction - Thomas Harriot Summer Series 2021 Slide 23 Introduction - Thomas Harriot Summer Series 2021 Slide 24 Introduction - Thomas Harriot Summer Series 2021 Slide 25 Introduction - Thomas Harriot Summer Series 2021 Slide 26 Introduction - Thomas Harriot Summer Series 2021 Slide 27 Introduction - Thomas Harriot Summer Series 2021 Slide 28 Introduction - Thomas Harriot Summer Series 2021 Slide 29 Introduction - Thomas Harriot Summer Series 2021 Slide 30 Introduction - Thomas Harriot Summer Series 2021 Slide 31 Introduction - Thomas Harriot Summer Series 2021 Slide 32
Upcoming SlideShare
What to Upload to SlideShare
Next

0 Likes

Share

Introduction - Thomas Harriot Summer Series 2021

A brief introduction to Thomas Harriot (1560-1621) and the 2021 Thomas Harriot Summer Series, run by Dr. Robert Goulding (Reilly Center for Science, Technology, and Values, Notre Dame) and Dr. Arnaud Zimmern (Navari Family Center for Digital Scholarship, Notre Dame).

Related Books

Free with a 30 day trial from Scribd

See all

Related Audiobooks

Free with a 30 day trial from Scribd

See all
  • Be the first to like this

Introduction - Thomas Harriot Summer Series 2021

  1. 1. Thomas Harriot Summer Series Introduction Friday, June 18, 2021
  2. 2. Thomas Harriot (1560-1621) Brief biography 2 1560: Born in Oxfordshire 1577: Matriculates at Oxford (St Mary’s Hall: Oriel College) from 1580: Humphrey Gilbert (to ‘83), Walter Raleigh 1584: First Virginia voyage 1585-6: Harriot in Virginia (Roanoke) 1588/90: A brief and true report of the New Found Land of Virginia from c. 1593: Henry Percy, 9th Earl of Northumberland. → Sion House 1597: First optical experiments July 22, 1601: discovers “law of refraction” 1603: Raleigh imprisoned in Tower 1605: Northumberland imprisoned in Tower 1606-9: Harriot writes to Kepler about refraction July 1609: Makes first ever telescopic map of the moon July 1621: Dies after long illness
  3. 3. Harriot’s Manuscripts
  4. 4. Harriot’s Manuscripts ● Rediscovered 1784, in Petworth House (seat of the Egremonts, successors to the Percys, Earls of Northumberland). ● Papers of “modern interest” separated by Franz von Zach. ● Harriot said to anticipate and surpass both Galileo and Kepler. ● Debacle of attempted publication in Oxford at Clarendon Press. See Jackie Stedall, “Thomas Harriot (1560-1621): History and Historiography” 4
  5. 5. 1794-8: Verdict of Abraham Robertson, Savilian Professor of Geometry “Every thing depending upon the composition and resolution of forces is so much better understood, and more clearly treated, since the discoveries of Sir Isaac Newton, that it would suffer much upon comparison with modern publications. The subject is more fully and elegantly handled in Keill’s Introduction to Natural Philosophy. [The papers on] the spots of the sun. I do not think that Harriott ever intended them for publication; nor do I think that the publication of them now would either satisfy rational curiosity, or contribute, in the smallest degree, to the advancement of astronomy. Upon the whole it is my opinion that the publication of the papers mentioned in this report could only tend to prove that Harriott was very assiduous in his mathematical studies, and in his observations of the heavenly bodies; it could not contribute to the advancement of science.” 5
  6. 6. Current State of Manuscripts ● Zach’s “significant” papers returned to Petworth House (where they still are). ● Remainder (the vast bulk) donated to British Museum (BL); divided into 8 volumes along subject lines: MSS Additional 6782-9. ● Other material found in BL in Harley fondo; and in Bodleian Library, Rigaud fondo. ● Papers in Sion College (now in Lambeth Palace). ● Until recently, only place to see all papers (almost) together: University of Delaware Special Collections, Shirley collection. 6
  7. 7. Modern publications ● Committee formed in 1975 to publish a 7-volume edition of Harriot’s papers. ● Editions of small treatises found among the papers (on collision of bodies) ● Matthias Schemmel: The English Galileo: Thomas Harriot’s work on motion as an example of preclassical mechanics ● Janet Beery and Jackie Stedall: Thomas Harriot’s doctrine of triangular numbers: the “Magisteria magna” (interpolation methods) 7
  8. 8. Front page of Harriot project (hosted at MPIWG) 8
  9. 9. Matthias Schemmel’s “maps” 9
  10. 10. The top-level “maps” 10
  11. 11. Exploring some of the mathematical papers 11
  12. 12. A network of manuscript pages 12
  13. 13. Manuscript and text view 13
  14. 14. Full manuscript view ... 14
  15. 15. … in extraordinary resolution 15
  16. 16. Harriot the Explorer
  17. 17. Harriot teaches navigation to Raleigh’s sailors (1595 and 1584) MS Add. 6788, fol. 491 17 “How to know your course to sayle to any place assigned; & in sayling to make true recconing to find where you are at any time; & how farre from any place desired.”
  18. 18. Everyday life in Virginia Watercolor by John White (1585/6) 18
  19. 19. Watercolors by John White (1585/6) 19 Everyday life in Virginia
  20. 20. 20 The Harriot/White Map of Virginia White’s Watercolor de Bry’s Engraving
  21. 21. “Most things they saw with us, as Mathematical instruments, sea compasses, the virtue of the loadstone in drawing iron, a perspective glass whereby was shown many strange sights, burning glasses, wildfire works, guns, books, writing and reading, spring clocks that seem to go of themselves, and many other things that we had, were so strange to them, and so far exceeded their capacities to comprehend the reason and means how they should be made and done, that they thought they were rather the works of gods than of men, or at the leastwise they had been given and taught us of the gods. Which made many of them to have such opinion of us, as that if they knew not the truth of god and religion already, it was rather to be had from us, whom God so specially loved than from a people that were so simple, as they found themselves to be in comparison of us. Whereupon greater credit was given to that we spoke of concerning such matters.” (A brief and true report, 1588) 21 Harriot: Science and Imperialism in the New World
  22. 22. Harriot’s algebraic phonetic alphabet for the Algonquin language 22 MS Add. 6782, fol. 337r
  23. 23. Westminster School 23 1585 version in papers of Richard Busby An universall Alphabet conteyninge six & thirty letters, whereby may be expressed the lively image of mans voyce in what language soever; first devised upon occasion to seeke for fit letters to expresse the Virginian speche. 1585. Beginning of Lord’s Prayer “Matthew Royden” (a poet, and one of Harriot’s friends from Oxford, and through the early 1580s)
  24. 24. MS Add. 6789, fol. 390 24 Harriot’s “cipher” “An yris videtur in punkto yunionis - No.” (“Is a rainbow seen at the point of union? No.”)
  25. 25. Harriot the Mathematical Explorer
  26. 26. A desire to find a way to the interior of things … 26 MS Add. 6789, fol 336
  27. 27. 27 … and to transform messy reality into algebra and calculation Giulio Parigi, Palazzo degli Uffizi, c. 1600 MS Add. 6789, fol. 116
  28. 28. Seeing the world through a mathematical lens 28 MS Add. 6788, fols 411r-v
  29. 29. Harriot on the Burning Mirror 29 MS Add. 6789, fol 390
  30. 30. MS Add. 6789, fol 116 30 Harriot’s innovation: a “functional” approach
  31. 31. MS Add. 6789, fol. 116v 31 Mathematics and the imagination “If the sun’s diameter were 2° 46′ 40″, it would burn up everything on earth. I should give some thought to this question: how big would the apparent diameter be in the sphere of Venus and Mercury?”
  32. 32. 1. How many people fit on the globe? 2. Mr Bulkeley’s Glass: Refraction, mathematics, and the imagination 3. Mapping the Moon 4. Billiard Balls: Collision and Stacking – mathematical model making 5. Conic sections – tools for exploring mathematics and nature 6. Binary numbers, combinations – and divination Themes of the next six meetings

A brief introduction to Thomas Harriot (1560-1621) and the 2021 Thomas Harriot Summer Series, run by Dr. Robert Goulding (Reilly Center for Science, Technology, and Values, Notre Dame) and Dr. Arnaud Zimmern (Navari Family Center for Digital Scholarship, Notre Dame).

Views

Total views

64

On Slideshare

0

From embeds

0

Number of embeds

24

Actions

Downloads

0

Shares

0

Comments

0

Likes

0

×