Opening up the Archives throughEducation and OutreachAndrew PayneHead of Education & OutreachThe National Archives
The National Archives’ Public TaskOur responsibility is                 for the government record,      its past and futur...
11,000,000 boxes
1 quadrillion bytes – 1 Petabyte of storage
Domesday - 1086
Magna Carta - 1225
Declaration of Independence - 1776
William Hole Map of Virginia - 1612
Boulton-Watt Steam Engine - 1775
Census Records 1841-1911
Henry Cole’s Rat - 1838
UK Government Web Archive13
Education and Outreach by Numbers           15      0.5      76      2.5      9       9   •   Permanent staff in departmen...
Investing in our future audience
Invest in your future audience…  “those who were  taken to museums  libraries, and  archives as  children…are more  likely...
Archives have the power to make students think!
Memory is the residue of thought“Your memory is not theproduct of what you wantto remember or what youtry to remember; it‟...
Where do teachers and students get sourcematerial?    In tests 61 out of 69 student  teachers at Cambridge University    w...
20
Key Principles ofThe National ArchivesEducation & Outreach      Service
Services designed to support the Curriculum • Investigate   personal, family or local   history and how they relate   to a...
Investigate, don’t illustrate!Use sources for enquiry-based investigations
Use key questions to drive the activity…Let the students provide the answers                  How did Henry VIII get up in...
Historians “rummage” through sourcesLet students direct their own investigation  www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/education/wor...
Context is everything…So whole documents are essential     The Making of the United Kingdom                        James M...
Context is everything…Thinking critically should be taught in thecontext of subject matter…an important part ofthinking li...
Technology provides access and engagementBut never forget that historical enquiry is the purpose
Taught Sessions40 different lessons available in 3 formats
Onsite workshops
Videoconferences
Virtual Classroom
www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/education
Activity 2:What’s the story?
Step 1: Study your document•   What questions do you need to ask?•   What answers does it provide?•   What doesn‟t it tell...
Step 2: Find a friend…•   Ask them about their document•   Answer their questions about your document•   What‟s the story ...
Steps 3 – 5: Find some more friends…•   Ask them about their documents•   Answer their questions about your document•   Wh...
Step 6: What’s the story• Place the documents in the correct chronological order• Tell the story
Here’s the story
PCOM 7 / 252
PCOM 7 / 252
AR1/528
AR1/528
AR1/528
Teach the Teacher –delivering greater impact      through CPD(continuing professional development)
Online unit with the Historical Associationwww.history.org.uk46
Videos of workshops in action47
Video tutorials from our education team48
Curriculum focused bundles of documents49
Masters module with Roehampton University50
Transatlantic Teachers Programme –The University of Virginia51
The Virtual Classroom Experiencewww.taecanet.com/nationalarchives
Engaging audiences with     social media
www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/cabinetpapers
www.twitter.com/ukwarcabinet55
Flickr56
Africa Through a Lens57
TNA Labs – Trying out the clever stuff!58
Andrew PayneHead of EducationThe National Archivesandrew.payne@nationalarchives.gsi.gov.uk020 8392 5319www.nationalarchive...
Andrew Payne, head of Education and Outreach, National Archives, London, paper on seminar in Gentofte (DK) on archives and...
Andrew Payne, head of Education and Outreach, National Archives, London, paper on seminar in Gentofte (DK) on archives and...
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Andrew Payne, head of Education and Outreach, National Archives, London, paper on seminar in Gentofte (DK) on archives and learning

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paper at English, Dutch, Swedish, Danish seminar on Archives and Learning and New Media, March 17 on Gentofte Localhistorical Archives.

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  • And that is why, with the exec team and the management board, we have defined our public task, very simply and clearly.We will fight for the public record. We’ll be there. In a tough funding environment for information and records management in government. Where departments have a huge volume of information assets to keep. When the archive sector across the country needs our help to ensure that they can meet their obligations to the record. When the public partly depend on us to get access to the transparent government they deserve.Our role is fundamental. We have the credibility to do this. And we have an important part in the government’s transparency agenda, as the front-line service for the public record
  • Andrew Payne, head of Education and Outreach, National Archives, London, paper on seminar in Gentofte (DK) on archives and learning

    1. 1. Opening up the Archives throughEducation and OutreachAndrew PayneHead of Education & OutreachThe National Archives
    2. 2. The National Archives’ Public TaskOur responsibility is for the government record, its past and future, its use and re-use, authentic, available and accessible to all3
    3. 3. 11,000,000 boxes
    4. 4. 1 quadrillion bytes – 1 Petabyte of storage
    5. 5. Domesday - 1086
    6. 6. Magna Carta - 1225
    7. 7. Declaration of Independence - 1776
    8. 8. William Hole Map of Virginia - 1612
    9. 9. Boulton-Watt Steam Engine - 1775
    10. 10. Census Records 1841-1911
    11. 11. Henry Cole’s Rat - 1838
    12. 12. UK Government Web Archive13
    13. 13. Education and Outreach by Numbers 15 0.5 76 2.5 9 9 • Permanent staff in department 15 • Thousand students directly taught 2.5 • Million visitors to Education website 0.5 • Million £‟s budget department 76 • % engagement rating of staff14
    14. 14. Investing in our future audience
    15. 15. Invest in your future audience… “those who were taken to museums libraries, and archives as children…are more likely to visit as an adult.” „Taking Part‟ DCMS Report 2007
    16. 16. Archives have the power to make students think!
    17. 17. Memory is the residue of thought“Your memory is not theproduct of what you wantto remember or what youtry to remember; it‟s theproduct of what you thinkabout” Daniel T. Willingham Why Don’t Students Like School Jossey-Bass 200918
    18. 18. Where do teachers and students get sourcematerial? In tests 61 out of 69 student teachers at Cambridge University went straight to Wikipedia via Google
    19. 19. 20
    20. 20. Key Principles ofThe National ArchivesEducation & Outreach Service
    21. 21. Services designed to support the Curriculum • Investigate personal, family or local history and how they relate to a broader historical context • Appreciate the role of museums, galleries, archi ves and historic sites • use ICT to research, process and present information about the past History Programme of Study QCA 2007
    22. 22. Investigate, don’t illustrate!Use sources for enquiry-based investigations
    23. 23. Use key questions to drive the activity…Let the students provide the answers How did Henry VIII get up in the morning?
    24. 24. Historians “rummage” through sourcesLet students direct their own investigation www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/education/worldwar2
    25. 25. Context is everything…So whole documents are essential The Making of the United Kingdom James Mason SP 16/488/25
    26. 26. Context is everything…Thinking critically should be taught in thecontext of subject matter…an important part ofthinking like a historian is considering thesource of a document – who wrote it, whenand why. But teaching students to ask thatquestion, independent of subject matterknowledge, won‟t do much good. Daniel T. Willingham Critical Thinking: Why is it so hard to teach? American Educator Summer 2007
    27. 27. Technology provides access and engagementBut never forget that historical enquiry is the purpose
    28. 28. Taught Sessions40 different lessons available in 3 formats
    29. 29. Onsite workshops
    30. 30. Videoconferences
    31. 31. Virtual Classroom
    32. 32. www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/education
    33. 33. Activity 2:What’s the story?
    34. 34. Step 1: Study your document• What questions do you need to ask?• What answers does it provide?• What doesn‟t it tell you?• What‟s the story so far…?• What more do you need to know?
    35. 35. Step 2: Find a friend…• Ask them about their document• Answer their questions about your document• What‟s the story so far…?• What more do you need to know?
    36. 36. Steps 3 – 5: Find some more friends…• Ask them about their documents• Answer their questions about your document• What‟s the story so far…?• What more do you need to know?
    37. 37. Step 6: What’s the story• Place the documents in the correct chronological order• Tell the story
    38. 38. Here’s the story
    39. 39. PCOM 7 / 252
    40. 40. PCOM 7 / 252
    41. 41. AR1/528
    42. 42. AR1/528
    43. 43. AR1/528
    44. 44. Teach the Teacher –delivering greater impact through CPD(continuing professional development)
    45. 45. Online unit with the Historical Associationwww.history.org.uk46
    46. 46. Videos of workshops in action47
    47. 47. Video tutorials from our education team48
    48. 48. Curriculum focused bundles of documents49
    49. 49. Masters module with Roehampton University50
    50. 50. Transatlantic Teachers Programme –The University of Virginia51
    51. 51. The Virtual Classroom Experiencewww.taecanet.com/nationalarchives
    52. 52. Engaging audiences with social media
    53. 53. www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/cabinetpapers
    54. 54. www.twitter.com/ukwarcabinet55
    55. 55. Flickr56
    56. 56. Africa Through a Lens57
    57. 57. TNA Labs – Trying out the clever stuff!58
    58. 58. Andrew PayneHead of EducationThe National Archivesandrew.payne@nationalarchives.gsi.gov.uk020 8392 5319www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/education

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