Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Mandala
Is a spiritual and ritual symbol in Indian religions, representing
the universe.
In common use, "mandala" has become a gen...
Garbhagriha
Is the sanctum sanctorum, the innermost sanctum of a Hindu
temple where resides the murti (idol or icon) of th...
Graeco-Buddhist “aesthetic”
Greco-Buddhist art is the artistic manifestation of
Greco-Buddhism, a cultural syncretism between the
Classical Greek cult...
Gandhara Buddha
Wine-drinking and music (Detail from Chakhil-i-
Ghoundi stupa, Hadda, 1st-2nd century AD)
Vastu Shastra
Vastu Shastra
Is a traditional Hindu system of architecture, which literally translates
to "science of architecture.“
Thes...
Hafeez Contractor
Le Corbusier’s Master Plan for the City
of Chandigarh
Palace of Assembly
High Court
Le Corbusier had a social agenda behind his theories. He believed that there is a
scientific, universal basis for everythi...
Le Corbusier theories are criticized on many grounds. He contradicts himself
when he claims to be a proponent of democracy...
HISTORY: INDIAN AESTHETICS
HISTORY: INDIAN AESTHETICS
HISTORY: INDIAN AESTHETICS
HISTORY: INDIAN AESTHETICS
HISTORY: INDIAN AESTHETICS
HISTORY: INDIAN AESTHETICS
HISTORY: INDIAN AESTHETICS
HISTORY: INDIAN AESTHETICS
HISTORY: INDIAN AESTHETICS
HISTORY: INDIAN AESTHETICS
HISTORY: INDIAN AESTHETICS
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

HISTORY: INDIAN AESTHETICS

2,234 views

Published on

History of Architecture 3
Report by: Ira Yap
DLS-College of St. Benilde
School of Architecture
3rd Term S.Y. 2015-16
May 2016

Published in: Design
  • Be the first to comment

HISTORY: INDIAN AESTHETICS

  1. 1. Mandala
  2. 2. Is a spiritual and ritual symbol in Indian religions, representing the universe. In common use, "mandala" has become a generic term for any diagram, chart or geometric pattern that represents the cosmos metaphysically or symbolically; a microcosm of the universe.
  3. 3. Garbhagriha Is the sanctum sanctorum, the innermost sanctum of a Hindu temple where resides the murti (idol or icon) of the primary deity of the temple. Literally the word means "womb chamber", from the Sanskrit words garbha for womb and griha for house. Only 'priests' (pujari) are allowed to enter this chamber.
  4. 4. Graeco-Buddhist “aesthetic”
  5. 5. Greco-Buddhist art is the artistic manifestation of Greco-Buddhism, a cultural syncretism between the Classical Greek culture and Buddhism, which developed over a period of close to 1000 years in Central Asia, between the conquests of Alexander the Great in the 4th century BC, and the Islamic conquests of the 7th century AD.
  6. 6. Gandhara Buddha
  7. 7. Wine-drinking and music (Detail from Chakhil-i- Ghoundi stupa, Hadda, 1st-2nd century AD)
  8. 8. Vastu Shastra
  9. 9. Vastu Shastra Is a traditional Hindu system of architecture, which literally translates to "science of architecture.“ These are texts found on the Indian subcontinent that describe principles of design, layout, measurements, ground preparation, space arrangement and spatial geometry. Vastu Shastras incorporate traditional Hindu and in some cases Buddhist beliefs. The designs are intended to integrate architecture with nature, the relative functions of various parts of the structure, and ancient beliefs utilizing geometric patterns (yantra), symmetry and directional alignments.
  10. 10. Hafeez Contractor
  11. 11. Le Corbusier’s Master Plan for the City of Chandigarh
  12. 12. Palace of Assembly
  13. 13. High Court
  14. 14. Le Corbusier had a social agenda behind his theories. He believed that there is a scientific, universal basis for everything including the needs and preferences of human beings. Thus, the same design scheme would be applicable all around. He “proclaimed democracy and equality through the built environment” and believed that “good or enlightened buildings would elicit similar attitudes or behaviors in individuals interacting with those buildings” (Birmingham, 1999, 296). The notion that the physical environment impacts human behavior remains highly contested. The relatively new discipline, related to urban planning and design, is known as ‘Design Influencing Social Practice (DiSP)’.
  15. 15. Le Corbusier theories are criticized on many grounds. He contradicts himself when he claims to be a proponent of democracy, yet paternalistically imposes an order upon people with his vision of an advanced built environment. Scholars such as Jane Jacobs claim that Le Corbusier’s vision of cities is disassociated from popular input. Jacobs says “The materiality of the building is a relational effect. It is a building event rather than simply a building” (Jacobs, 2006, 11). This means that social interactions and contexts have much to do with the nature of a building and merely providing a technical concept and “purity” of design, such as Le Corbusier’s emphasis on geometry, cannot solely predict the impacts a building will have on its inhabitants.

×