© Copyright 2013 Arceil Leadership Ltd.    All rights reserved.unauthorized reproduction or presentation is strictly prohi...
Arceil Rainbowconceptual overview
StructureIs Everywhere                © Copyright 2013 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
Business Has Plenty of Structure, Too             But it is oriented to the work of management,                    not to ...
© Copyright 2013 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
Where?         © Copyright 2013 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
What They’re Asking        in the Awareness / Focus Stage                 Has our destination (our vision) changed?       ...
What?Where?                 © Copyright 2013 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
What They’re Asking     in the Understanding / Curiosity Stage                  What do they want me to do differently?   ...
Why?         What?Where?                        © Copyright 2013 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
What They’re Asking       in the Acceptance / Passion Stage                 Is this just another program of the month?    ...
Aristotle’s Rhetoric                        Logos                     • Appeal to power of facts, reason, and logic       ...
Aristotle’s Rhetoric       Pathos    • Appeal to emotional state of listener    • Examples: hope, fear, pride, frustration...
Aristotle’s Rhetoric        Ethos    • Appeal by character of the leader    • Examples: valor, wisdom, experience    • Lea...
How?                 Why?         What?Where?                        © Copyright 2013 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights re...
What They’re Asking      in the Commitment / Courage Stage                 How much opportunity is in this for me?        ...
How?                 Why?         What?Where?                        © Copyright 2013 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights re...
© Copyright 2013 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.This is the way the world ends.Not with a bang but a whimper. ...
Where Strategies and Initiatives Die                    *                *            *        *                 © Copyrig...
Let‟s look first at strategic focus.Why is it important?Why should we take the time andgo to the trouble of exploring it?
The threshold beforeAwareness is the firstgraveyard of strategies.
Gear Box for Engagement                    Awareness     Understanding   Acceptance                      Commitment(5.0) O...
What Focus Looks Like             Engagement of the Eyes•   Common view of purpose, direction, aspirations, priorities•   ...
Olga Viola The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes but in seeing with new eyes.               ...
Carl Ford cannot hear the crowd
In 67, the Triple Crown was nevereven mentioned once. We were soinvolved in the pennant race, I didntknow I‟d won the Trip...
Far more than you may realize,your experience, your world, andeven your self are the creations ofwhat you focus on.The tar...
A man lives by believingsomething; not bydebating and arguingabout many things.                 Thomas Carlyle Scottish ph...
Focus Is Essential to Success   •   Without focus, there is no direction   •   Without direction, there is no progress   •...
Alice in WonderlandAlice:         Cheshire Puss, would you tell               me please which way I ought               to...
What are somecommon barriersto greater focusin the workplace?
Environmental Barriers to Focus  •   Constant, multiple distractions  •   Steady increases in deliverables, decreases in s...
Information Gridlock•   Dramatic recent rise in quantity of data•   Most of our work time is devoted to it•   Excess of 3,...
Information is not knowledge.Knowledge is not wisdom.Wisdom is not truth. Truth isnot beauty. Beauty is not love.         ...
From Gridlock to Goldilocks                 •   Repetition of messages                 •   Flag key announcements         ...
Self-Imposed Barriers to Focus •   Single delivery of information or messages •   Excessive, fickle, or unnecessarily comp...
What are somebold ways to buildmore focusin the workplace?
Strategies for Nurturing Focus•   Never forget why customers are walking in the front door•   Settle on a few, sustainable...
Focus and Perspective   •   Inspiring, ennobling inner sense of direction   •   Of deep, transcending importance to people...
Now let‟s look at strategic curiosity.Why is it important?Why should we take the time and goto the trouble of exploring it?
The cusp betweenAwareness and Understanding  is the second graveyard       of strategies.
Gear Box for Engagement                   Awareness      Understanding   Acceptance                   Commitment(5.0) Over...
The Scotty Who Knew Too Much            James Thurber                 MoralIt is better to ask some of the questions    th...
What Curiosity Looks Like     Engagement of the Mind•   Plain line-of-sight to strategic direction and intent•   Broad-bas...
The mind is not a vessel to be filled but a fire to be kindled.                                                           ...
The problem is not that there are problems. The problem isexpecting otherwise and thinking that having problems is a probl...
Be Relentlessly CuriousI am enough of an artist to drawfreely upon my imagination.Imagination is more importantthan knowle...
I can live with doubt anduncertainty and not knowing.It‟s much more interesting tolive not knowing than to haveanswers tha...
We make our world significantby the courage of our questionsand the depth of our answers.                       Carl Sagan
What are somecommon barriersto deeper curiosityin the workplace?
Some Barriers to Curiosity•   A culture of self-satisfaction, excessive pride•   Priority for speed and urgency over colla...
More Barriers to Curiosity•   Failure to make strategy relevant to individuals and work teams•   Insecurity, perceived thr...
What are somebold ways to buildmore curiosityin the workplace?
Never accept that aquestion has beenanswered as well as itever will be.                Michael Lewis                     M...
I‟m looking for a lot of men with an infinitecapacity for not knowing what can‟t be done.                                 ...
Strategies for Nurturing Curiosity•   Be endlessly curious about things that matter•   Regard everyone as a teacher with s...
Let‟s look next at strategic passion.Why is it important?Why should we take the time and goto the trouble of exploring it?
The most powerful weaponon earth is the human soulon fire.           Marshal Ferdinand Foch            Supreme Allied Comm...
The cusp betweenUnderstanding and Acceptance   is the third graveyard       of strategies.
Gear Box for Engagement                   Awareness      Understanding   Acceptance                   Commitment(5.0) Over...
What Passion Looks Like       Engagement of the Heart•   Real excitement and enthusiasm, eagerness for work•   Zeal for sa...
“What is the central passion of a life?”Or perhaps justto questionas I am doing now,& to teach by questioning . . .Yes—thi...
If you work just for money, you‟ll never make it, but if you love whatyou‟re doing and you always put the customer first, ...
What are somecommon barriersto greater passionin the workplace?
Some Barriers to Passion•   A severely dispassionate, cold, analytical, phlegmatic style•   Imbalanced purpose, too much e...
What are somebold ways to buildmore passionin the workplace?
Strategies for Nurturing Passion•   Show your own passion for the work you do•   Remind people of the importance of your c...
Finally, let‟s look at strategic courage.Why is it important?Why should we take the time and go tothe trouble of exploring...
The cusp betweenAcceptance and Commitment  is the fourth graveyard      of strategies.
Gear Box for Engagement                    Awareness     Understanding   Acceptance                     Commitment(5.0) Ov...
What Courage Looks Like        Engagement of the Will•   Genuine voice, participation in dialogue, speaking up fearlessly•...
Nelson Mandela                 Wisdom is inseparable from courage.                                                    Socr...
Your Impact Is In Your PersonPeople Respect People Who Speak Up and Speak OutKing George VI (Colin Firth): "Listen to me. ...
Inside my voice there is a soul, and in my soul there is a voice                                                          ...
Cowardice asks the question: Is it safe?Expedience asks the question: Is it politic?Vanity asks the question: Is it popula...
The Liberating Power of Courage   The most courageous act is still to            think for yourself. Aloud.               ...
Courage doesn‟t always roar.Sometimes courage is the quietvoice at the end of the day, saying,“I will try again tomorrow.”...
What are somecommon barriersto more couragein the workplace?
Some Barriers to Courage•   „My way or the highway‟•   A desire to go along, to fit in, to be like everyone else•   Prefer...
What are somebold ways to buildmore couragein the workplace?
Strategies for Nurturing Courage•    Demonstrate courage in ways small and large•    Acknowledge fear as a legitimate emot...
If it is noble . . .Do it because you can.Do it because someone should.Do it because you are here, now.Do it because you a...
Master Class   Conceptual Overview   January  2013
Master Class   Conceptual Overview   January  2013
Master Class   Conceptual Overview   January  2013
Master Class   Conceptual Overview   January  2013
Master Class   Conceptual Overview   January  2013
Master Class   Conceptual Overview   January  2013
Master Class   Conceptual Overview   January  2013
Master Class   Conceptual Overview   January  2013
Master Class   Conceptual Overview   January  2013
Master Class   Conceptual Overview   January  2013
Master Class   Conceptual Overview   January  2013
Master Class   Conceptual Overview   January  2013
Master Class   Conceptual Overview   January  2013
Master Class   Conceptual Overview   January  2013
Master Class   Conceptual Overview   January  2013
Master Class   Conceptual Overview   January  2013
Master Class   Conceptual Overview   January  2013
Master Class   Conceptual Overview   January  2013
Master Class   Conceptual Overview   January  2013
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Master Class Conceptual Overview January 2013

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This is the slide deck from Master Class that furnishes a conceptual overview of integrated strategic communication. It highlights the four graveyards of strategy, and it includes strategies for each of the four stages of strategic communication.

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  • Examples:organization chartsblueprintsproject budgetsjob applicationsprocess diagramsrevenue projections work schedulesGantt chartsmeeting agendasbalance sheetscash-flow statementsincome statements
  • Have you ever noticed the difference in tone between a company's marketing communication and its leadership communication on business strategy? Especially in the consumer-products sector, but elsewhere to an extent, it can be dramatic.Advertising is often unabashedly emotional. TV commercials for new cars, for example, commonly appeal to the pride of ownership and, at the holidays, even the joy of giving. They play down or ignore things like horsepower or trade-in value. Advertising for life insurance tugs at the heartstrings of family, and 30-second spots for beer invoke friendship and fun.In contrast, a company's employee communication on business strategy is typically straightforward, sober, and matter-of-fact. There is little emotion. Yes, you see sporadic articles and photographs in newsletters on dedicated employees or extraordinary service. But the fundamental purpose of business is often reduced to quarterly goals, and the bulk of information is on new procedures and controls.Canadian neurologist Donald B. Calne observes: "Reasoning leads to conclusions. Emotion leads to action."Conclusions are important. Facts and logic have an important role. But action is essential. If emotion brings us to the brink of action, then it is an essential component of employee communication. We neglect it to our peril.Always be mindful of the fact that people find a great deal of motivation in positive, affirmative appeals of emotion. Employees need straight information, of course. But they also need to hear the emotional cause for working hard, doing the right thing, persevering through adversity, scratching the creative itch, and taking risks. They need to hear of pride, service, loyalty, and so much more. Anyone who has ever succeeded at anything knows the importance and the truth of this.
  • Most leaders see the essence of leadership as influence, and that is understandable. People who follow in the footsteps of a leader have generally been influenced by the leader to think, speak, or behave in a certain way.Ironically, leaders can be far more effective by first allowing themselves to be influenced, both by others and by themselves.First, just by seeking out and listening to others, the leader conveys the important message that she sincerely appreciates the experience, knowledge, and perspective of the people she would lead. When genuine, and only when genuine, this reciprocity renders people more receptive to her influence than they might otherwise be.Second, by influencing herself, she serves as a walking example of the message. She becomes, to paraphrase Ghandi, the change she seeks. People can watch her model the message, and they can emulate it. They will watch and emulate her, too, in ways she cannot possibly imagine beforehand.Look back over your own life and career. Think back to the individuals you have held in high regard: teachers, parents, coaches, perhaps even peers. Notice how many instances you tried to be like those persons you so respected.Inasmuch as leaders lead by example, they transcend the act of influencing people to the beauty of inspiring people. That is the real power, even the magic, of leadership.
  • My old next-door neighbor was a wide receiver in the National Football League. One evening, while we were both grilling out, he and I got to talking about football. He began describing for me what it was like to play professional football before thousands and thousands of people. Then he said something I will never forget.Carl had so honed his craft, so thoroughly ingrained it, that when I asked how it feels to catch a pass in a game, he had to take himself physically through the motions to be able to respond. It was comical in a way.At one point, standing on the patio, he had his arms outstretched, as if he were catching a pass over his left shoulder. He remarked that, as he is running to reach the pass, he cannot hear the stadium crowd.That just stunned me.I found it incredible. Think about it: Fifty thousand, sixty thousand, maybe seventy thousand fans in the stadium, most of them screaming their throats dry, and he cannot hear them.Carl went on. He said he can hear his own footsteps, and he can hear his own breathing. But he cannot hear the crowd. As the ball falls gracefully into his arms, almost in slow-motion, his only focus is on wrapping his fingers around it, pulling it in and keeping it close, and then reaching the goal line with it. Those are the only things that matter. Everything else, including the crowd, ceases to exist. It just isn't there.Now that's focus.Imagine, just imagine, if the hundreds or the thousands of people in your organization all had such extraordinary intensity of focus around your business goals and strategy. Most certainly they, and you, would be performing at a level you have only dreamed about.There are tools and techniques to build that kind of focus. But the master key that unlocks it is your own focus. For you cannot ask of others what you have not demanded of yourself. If you yourself, as a leader, are not truly focused on strategic imperatives, no one else will be.Begin with this simple question, and answer with a bucket of ice-cold honesty: What is it that you are most concerned about? Let's agree to net out the personal stuff: your kids, house repairs, aging parents, weekend plans. As you come to work each morning, what is it about the business that is most on your mind?If you're like many managers, and probably most, execution of the business plan isn't front and center. Nor is realizing a long-term vision. Living out the company's values isn't close. While your monthly nut and year-end bonus are probably right up there, chances are your day-to-day focus any given morning is on a personnel issue, or a conference call at 9, or a dysfunctional staff department, or a draft marketing plan, or an OSHA inspection, or performance reviews, or squeezing another 1 percent from next year's budget, or any of a thousand other things that compete for your time and attention. That's the reality of life in management.Because your focus is on these front burners, it is only natural to put truly strategic issues on the back burner. We quietly tell ourselves it is only for a day, only for the week. We'll get to the important stuff next week, next month.Meanwhile, anyone and everyone with whom we come into contact immediately senses our real priorities, our real focus. We cannot hide. Every question we ask, every comment we make, betrays our real interest, our real concern. Because our real priorities and real focus are something other than the organization's strategic vision and long-term goals, the vision and the goals slip to second place, and then to third, and then off the grid altogether.We all know that the hardest person to manage, and the hardest person to lead, is one and the same. You say hello every morning in the mirror. Only you can change that person's priorities, and therefore it is you who must.Tomorrow morning, and for just one day at a time, shift your focus. Throw a spotlight on the strategic. Let the little things fall into place on their own. They will, after all.For just one day, focus on the truly important things. Govern your questions and comments so that most of what you say, all day, creates energy around your strategic imperatives. Don't neglect or even diminish the lubricants of human relationships, of course. But let any substantive remark about the business revolve around the organization's vision and strategic intent.Imagine you are Carl, running out and in. Reach out your arms. Look for the ball. Run to it. Listen to your own footsteps, your own breathing. Let the ball fall into your arms, as if no one is watching. It's just you, the ball, and the goal line.Chances are the game will change.
  • Recognize the need to repeat messagesCall attention to key announcementsClarify roles and responsibilities for managers, team leadersEstablish protocol for face-to-face, e-mail, voice mailRe-engineer training toward real-world pressures and needsCreate orderly systems of retrieval for in-house experts, studies, records, jargon and acronyms, detail-intensive data
  • Several summers ago there was a Scottie who went to the country for a visit. He decided that all the farm dogs were cowards because they were afraid of a certain animal that had a white stripe down its back.“You are a pussycat and I can lick you,” the Scottie said to the farm dog who lived in the house where the Scottie was visiting. “I can lick the animal with the white stripe too. Show him to me.”“Don’t you want to ask any questions about him?” said the farm dog.“Nah,” said the Scottie. “You ask the questions.”So the farm dog took the Scottie into the woods and showed him the white-striped animal, and the Scottie closed in on him, growling and slashing. It was all over in a moment, and the Scottie lay on his back.When he came to, the farm dog said, “What happened?”“He threw vitriol,” said the Scottie, “but he never laid a glove on me.”A few days later the farm dog told the Scottie there was another animal all the farm dogs were afraid of.“Lead me to him,” said the Scottie. “I can lick anything that doesn’t wear horseshoes.”“Don’t you want to ask any questions about him?” said the farm dog.“Nah,” said the Scottie. “Just show me where he hangs out.”  So the farm dog led him to a place in the woods and pointed out the little animal when he came along.“The clown,” said the Scottie. “A pushover.”  And he closed in, leading with his left and exhibiting some mighty fancy footwork. In less than a second, the Scottie was flat on his back, and when he woke up the farm dog was pulling quills out of him.“What happened?” said the farm dog.“He pulled a knife on me,” said the Scottie. “But at least I’ve learned how you fight up here in the country, and now I’m going to beat you up.”So he closed in on the farm dog, holding his nose with one front paw to ward off the vitriol and covering his eyes with the other front paw to keep out the knives. The Scottie couldn’t see his opponent, and he couldn’t smell his opponent, and he was so badly beaten that he had to be taken back to the city and put in a nursing home.Moral? It is better to ask some of the questions than to know all the answers.
  • In his later years as a writer and scientist, Sagan would often draw on his childhood memories to illustrate scientific points, as he did in his book, Shadows of Forgotten Ancestors.Sagan describes his parents' influence on his later thinking:My parents were not scientists. They knew almost nothing about science. But in introducing me simultaneously to skepticism and to wonder, they taught me the two uneasily cohabiting modes of thought that are central to the scientific method.
  • The Central PassionWhat is the central passionof a life?To please mummy & daddy?To find a home for their furniture?To found a family of one's own,possibly a dynasty?To fill the world with more booksthat have no readersor books that have too many& killtoo many trees?What is the passionthat drives usas the wind drivesa winged seed?To reproduce ourselves,then die?To meet God onceif only in a dream?To reach enlightenmentthrough painor pleasure?Or perhaps justto questionas I am doing now,& to teach by questioning. . .Yes-- this is both passion& powerenough.© Erica Mann Jong
  • Master Class Conceptual Overview January 2013

    1. 1. © Copyright 2013 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.unauthorized reproduction or presentation is strictly prohibited
    2. 2. Arceil Rainbowconceptual overview
    3. 3. StructureIs Everywhere © Copyright 2013 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
    4. 4. Business Has Plenty of Structure, Too But it is oriented to the work of management, not to the work of leadership. © Copyright 2013 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
    5. 5. © Copyright 2013 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
    6. 6. Where? © Copyright 2013 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
    7. 7. What They’re Asking in the Awareness / Focus Stage Has our destination (our vision) changed? Where is this strategy supposed to take us?Where? Where is it likely to take us? What is our timetable?QUESTIONS What are the odds of success? Is this a non-strategic aberration? Will I still have a job? Must I transfer again? © Copyright 2013 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
    8. 8. What?Where? © Copyright 2013 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
    9. 9. What They’re Asking in the Understanding / Curiosity Stage What do they want me to do differently? What do they want me to do faster?What? What do they want me to do better? What do they want me to do cheaper?QUESTIONS What do they want me to do more of? Less of? What do they want me to stop doing, so that I have time to do this? © Copyright 2013 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
    10. 10. Why? What?Where? © Copyright 2013 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
    11. 11. What They’re Asking in the Acceptance / Passion Stage Is this just another program of the month? Why should I bother? Why? Is there a coherent rationale for it? What‟s the cost-benefit analysis?QUESTIONS Have they done their due diligence? Why hasn‟t anyone talked to me about this? Does anyone care about me? © Copyright 2013 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
    12. 12. Aristotle’s Rhetoric Logos • Appeal to power of facts, reason, and logic • Examples: evidence, argument, case studiesIf all A are B • Must be interactive, iterative processAnd all B are C • Socratic Dialogue can be effectiveThen A is C • Leverage: • Obvious threat (Pearl Harbor, Sputnik) • Ambitious goal or lofty vision • Data (ideally graphical and comparative) • Clear, tangible penalty or rewards © Copyright 2013 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
    13. 13. Aristotle’s Rhetoric Pathos • Appeal to emotional state of listener • Examples: hope, fear, pride, frustration • Recognizes decisive role of intuition • Leverage: • Personal stories • Shared values and experiences • Common background or destiny • Music, colors, uniforms, icons • Human face and smile or frown © Copyright 2013 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
    14. 14. Aristotle’s Rhetoric Ethos • Appeal by character of the leader • Examples: valor, wisdom, experience • Leading by example, from the front • Leverage: • Overcoming large obstacles • Standing on principle • Sacrifice for the group • Demonstrated courage, integrity © Copyright 2013 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
    15. 15. How? Why? What?Where? © Copyright 2013 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
    16. 16. What They’re Asking in the Commitment / Courage Stage How much opportunity is in this for me? How much danger is lurking in it? How? Is this a one-size-fits-all thing? Can our unit make it work for us? How?QUESTIONS What will it take—in terms of resources, time, risk—to do this the way it should be done? What hasn‟t senior management thought of? © Copyright 2013 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
    17. 17. How? Why? What?Where? © Copyright 2013 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
    18. 18. © Copyright 2013 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.This is the way the world ends.Not with a bang but a whimper. T.S. Eliot The Hollow Men
    19. 19. Where Strategies and Initiatives Die * * * * © Copyright 2013 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
    20. 20. Let‟s look first at strategic focus.Why is it important?Why should we take the time andgo to the trouble of exploring it?
    21. 21. The threshold beforeAwareness is the firstgraveyard of strategies.
    22. 22. Gear Box for Engagement Awareness Understanding Acceptance Commitment(5.0) Overdrive Focus Curiosity Passion Courage(4.0) Drive Attention Clarity Trust Cooperation(3.0) Neutral Acquaintance Familiarity Ambivalence Inertia(2.0) Park Distraction Confusion Apathy Neglect(1.0) Reverse Alienation Denial Cynicism Resistance © Copyright 2013 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
    23. 23. What Focus Looks Like Engagement of the Eyes• Common view of purpose, direction, aspirations, priorities• Preoccupation with challenges, goals, resources, expectations• Alertness to operating metrics and milestones• „Soft eyes‟ for industry trends, strategic opportunities• Clear-cut emphasis on customer needs, sensitivities, expectations• More concern for the team than for the self Real Concentration © Copyright 2013 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
    24. 24. Olga Viola The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes but in seeing with new eyes. Marcel Proust
    25. 25. Carl Ford cannot hear the crowd
    26. 26. In 67, the Triple Crown was nevereven mentioned once. We were soinvolved in the pennant race, I didntknow I‟d won the Triple Crown untilthe next day, when I read it in thepaper. Carl Yastrzemski 26 September 2012 as Miguel Cabrera was on verge of a Triple Crown
    27. 27. Far more than you may realize,your experience, your world, andeven your self are the creations ofwhat you focus on.The targets of your attention arethe building blocks of your life. Winifred Gallagher Rapt
    28. 28. A man lives by believingsomething; not bydebating and arguingabout many things. Thomas Carlyle Scottish philosopher and writer Thomas Carlyle
    29. 29. Focus Is Essential to Success • Without focus, there is no direction • Without direction, there is no progress • Without progress, there is no achievement • Without achievement, there is no success © Copyright 2013 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
    30. 30. Alice in WonderlandAlice: Cheshire Puss, would you tell me please which way I ought to walk from here?Cat: That depends a good deal on where you want to get to.Alice: I don‟t much care where.Cat: Then it doesn‟t much matter which way you walk! Lewis Carroll The Adventures of Alice in Wonderland, 1866 © Copyright 2013 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
    31. 31. What are somecommon barriersto greater focusin the workplace?
    32. 32. Environmental Barriers to Focus • Constant, multiple distractions • Steady increases in deliverables, decreases in support • Ease and speed of access to other sources of data • Short attention spans • Preoccupation with personal issues and priorities • Expectation of high “production values” • Residual cynicism from past use of spin or silence You cannot wish away these barriers, but you must not ignore or neglect them. © Copyright 2013 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
    33. 33. Information Gridlock• Dramatic recent rise in quantity of data• Most of our work time is devoted to it• Excess of 3,000 messages per day• More than 1 million words read or heard per week• Declining „signal-to-noise ratio‟• Dubious benefits to wisdom and knowledge Data Smog © Copyright 2013 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
    34. 34. Information is not knowledge.Knowledge is not wisdom.Wisdom is not truth. Truth isnot beauty. Beauty is not love. Frank Zappa Mothers of Invention © Copyright 2013 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
    35. 35. From Gridlock to Goldilocks • Repetition of messages • Flag key announcements • Clarify responsibilities • Favor face-to-face • Provide advanced training • Create systems of retrieval • In-house Facebook © Copyright 2013 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
    36. 36. Self-Imposed Barriers to Focus • Single delivery of information or messages • Excessive, fickle, or unnecessarily complex messages • Unrealistic assumptions, especially on cascading • Settling for undefined terms, coining new terms • Lack of empathy and respect for colleagues • Information hoarding in middle management • Treating too much information as proprietary All these barriers are avoidable. None should be tolerated. © Copyright 2013 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
    37. 37. What are somebold ways to buildmore focusin the workplace?
    38. 38. Strategies for Nurturing Focus• Never forget why customers are walking in the front door• Settle on a few, sustainable messages• Find creative ways to express them, and repeat, repeat, repeat• Continually share new information around this core• Use devices: stories, graphs, explanations, tables, metaphors• Avoid new words, phrases, and acronyms—make strategy clear• Use a few clear metrics and regularly update performance data• Go hoarse asking lots of questions on a single strategic theme © Copyright 2013 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
    39. 39. Focus and Perspective • Inspiring, ennobling inner sense of direction • Of deep, transcending importance to people • A vision must ▪ build on authentic values of the organization ▪ paint a vivid picture of purpose and success ▪ be exciting, specific, applicable, achievable ▪ speak to unique strengths and context ▪ leave no doubt as to resources or resolve ▪ offer real line-of-sight to people © Copyright 2013 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
    40. 40. Now let‟s look at strategic curiosity.Why is it important?Why should we take the time and goto the trouble of exploring it?
    41. 41. The cusp betweenAwareness and Understanding is the second graveyard of strategies.
    42. 42. Gear Box for Engagement Awareness Understanding Acceptance Commitment(5.0) Overdrive Focus Curiosity Passion Courage(4.0) Drive Attention Clarity Trust Cooperation(3.0) Neutral Acquaintance Familiarity Ambivalence Inertia(2.0) Park Distraction Confusion Apathy Neglect(1.0) Reverse Alienation Denial Cynicism Resistance © Copyright 2013 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
    43. 43. The Scotty Who Knew Too Much James Thurber MoralIt is better to ask some of the questions than to know all the answers.
    44. 44. What Curiosity Looks Like Engagement of the Mind• Plain line-of-sight to strategic direction and intent• Broad-based grasp of the implications of strategy• Asking lots of good, rich questions about the business• Sensitivity to business complexities• Regular, energetic collaboration, cross-fertilization• Anticipation of difficulties, threats to success• Asking both why and why not• A safe haven for impertinent, tough questions Rigorous, Creative Thinking © Copyright 2013 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
    45. 45. The mind is not a vessel to be filled but a fire to be kindled. Plutarch
    46. 46. The problem is not that there are problems. The problem isexpecting otherwise and thinking that having problems is a problem. Theodore Isaac Rubin Psychoanalyst
    47. 47. Be Relentlessly CuriousI am enough of an artist to drawfreely upon my imagination.Imagination is more importantthan knowledge. Knowledge islimited. Imagination encircles theworld. Albert Einstein
    48. 48. I can live with doubt anduncertainty and not knowing.It‟s much more interesting tolive not knowing than to haveanswers that might be wrong. Richard Feynman Nobel laureate, physics
    49. 49. We make our world significantby the courage of our questionsand the depth of our answers. Carl Sagan
    50. 50. What are somecommon barriersto deeper curiosityin the workplace?
    51. 51. Some Barriers to Curiosity• A culture of self-satisfaction, excessive pride• Priority for speed and urgency over collaboration and creativity• Too much reliance on e-mail at the expense of face-to-face dialogue• Insufficient time for unstructured communication• Atmosphere of intimidation, especially sensed by diffident people• Oversimplifying statements, confusion over meaning and intent © Copyright 2013 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
    52. 52. More Barriers to Curiosity• Failure to make strategy relevant to individuals and work teams• Insecurity, perceived threat of serious questions• Physical, social distance between leaders and people• Misplaced sense of accountability as to role of workers• Discomfort with deep questions, inconvenient facts © Copyright 2013 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
    53. 53. What are somebold ways to buildmore curiosityin the workplace?
    54. 54. Never accept that aquestion has beenanswered as well as itever will be. Michael Lewis Moneyball
    55. 55. I‟m looking for a lot of men with an infinitecapacity for not knowing what can‟t be done. Henry Ford
    56. 56. Strategies for Nurturing Curiosity• Be endlessly curious about things that matter• Regard everyone as a teacher with something valuable to teach• Encourage deeper and better questions• Connect the dots, identify meaning, make sense of things• Interpret impact of strategy on day-to-day work• Explain and evaluate alternatives• Show what you’re not advocating—and why not• Clarify leadership intent at every opportunity• Show compelling rationale and reasoning for decisions © Copyright 2013 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
    57. 57. Let‟s look next at strategic passion.Why is it important?Why should we take the time and goto the trouble of exploring it?
    58. 58. The most powerful weaponon earth is the human soulon fire. Marshal Ferdinand Foch Supreme Allied Commander World War I 1851-1929 © Copyright 2013 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
    59. 59. The cusp betweenUnderstanding and Acceptance is the third graveyard of strategies.
    60. 60. Gear Box for Engagement Awareness Understanding Acceptance Commitment(5.0) Overdrive Focus Curiosity Passion Courage(4.0) Drive Attention Clarity Trust Cooperation(3.0) Neutral Acquaintance Familiarity Ambivalence Inertia(2.0) Park Distraction Confusion Apathy Neglect(1.0) Reverse Alienation Denial Cynicism Resistance © Copyright 2013 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
    61. 61. What Passion Looks Like Engagement of the Heart• Real excitement and enthusiasm, eagerness for work• Zeal for satisfying customers and attracting new customers• Old culture of entitlement yields to partnership, participation• An emotional connection to the purpose, promise, people, etc.• Confidence in the decency, wisdom of leadership• Respect for proprietary information Wanting to Make a Big Contribution © Copyright 2013 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
    62. 62. “What is the central passion of a life?”Or perhaps justto questionas I am doing now,& to teach by questioning . . .Yes—this is both passion& powerenough. Erica Jong
    63. 63. If you work just for money, you‟ll never make it, but if you love whatyou‟re doing and you always put the customer first, success will be yours. Ray Kroc
    64. 64. What are somecommon barriersto greater passionin the workplace?
    65. 65. Some Barriers to Passion• A severely dispassionate, cold, analytical, phlegmatic style• Imbalanced purpose, too much emphasis on shareholder value• Any perceived chink in your integrity• Sense of isolation, rigid hierarchy, inclination to distrust others• Too much talk of efficiency and technology, too little human touch• Insufficient time devoted to team building, social down time• Reluctance to share business information rapidly and routinely © Copyright 2013 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
    66. 66. What are somebold ways to buildmore passionin the workplace?
    67. 67. Strategies for Nurturing Passion• Show your own passion for the work you do• Remind people of the importance of your customer‟s need• Build relations of trust and resilience• Create clear opportunities to show faith in people• Show your vulnerability and authenticity• Confront and disarm hostility; show your decency• Offer the potential for deeply rewarding work• Laugh! Find excuses to celebrate and enjoy life and friendship• Offer yourself as an authentic person and servant © Copyright 2013 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
    68. 68. Finally, let‟s look at strategic courage.Why is it important?Why should we take the time and go tothe trouble of exploring it?
    69. 69. The cusp betweenAcceptance and Commitment is the fourth graveyard of strategies.
    70. 70. Gear Box for Engagement Awareness Understanding Acceptance Commitment(5.0) Overdrive Focus Curiosity Passion Courage(4.0) Drive Attention Clarity Trust Cooperation(3.0) Neutral Acquaintance Familiarity Ambivalence Inertia(2.0) Park Distraction Confusion Apathy Neglect(1.0) Reverse Alienation Denial Cynicism Resistance © Copyright 2013 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
    71. 71. What Courage Looks Like Engagement of the Will• Genuine voice, participation in dialogue, speaking up fearlessly• Constant wellspring of information, ideas, insight, intuition• Productive resolution of differences (neither silence nor violence)• Innovation, creativity, risk, new ideas and solutions• Real opportunity for anyone to make a difference• Perseverance, a strong dedication to mission and direction• Willingness to challenge the status quo, to offer suggestions Always Doing and Becoming More © Copyright 2013 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
    72. 72. Nelson Mandela Wisdom is inseparable from courage. Socrates quoted in Plato‟s Laches
    73. 73. Your Impact Is In Your PersonPeople Respect People Who Speak Up and Speak OutKing George VI (Colin Firth): "Listen to me. Listen to me!"Lionel Logue (Geoffrey Rush): "Listen to you? By what right?"King George VI: "By divine right if you must, I am your King."Lionel Logue: "No youre not, you told me so yourself. You didntwant it. Why should I waste my time listening?"King George VI: "Because I have a right to be heard. I have a voice!"Lionel Logue: [pauses] "Yes, you do."
    74. 74. Inside my voice there is a soul, and in my soul there is a voice India.Arie Grammy Award-winning songwriter and singer Strength, Courage & Wisdom
    75. 75. Cowardice asks the question: Is it safe?Expedience asks the question: Is it politic?Vanity asks the question: Is it popular?But conscience asks the question: Is it right?And there comes a time when one must takea position that is neither safe nor politic norpopular, but simply because it is right.The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.
    76. 76. The Liberating Power of Courage The most courageous act is still to think for yourself. Aloud. Coco Chanel The only thing we have to fear is fear itself. Franklin D. Roosevelt
    77. 77. Courage doesn‟t always roar.Sometimes courage is the quietvoice at the end of the day, saying,“I will try again tomorrow.” Mary Ann Radmacher Sculpture by Jeff Tritel © Copyright 2013 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
    78. 78. What are somecommon barriersto more couragein the workplace?
    79. 79. Some Barriers to Courage• „My way or the highway‟• A desire to go along, to fit in, to be like everyone else• Preference for the security of the known, what you have already done• Subtle, implicit messages that discourage innovative ideas• A one-way street of communication that stifles creativity• Hostility toward any perceived challenge to one‟s authority• Union representation, hostile work environment• Theory X assumptions in a Theory Z world © Copyright 2013 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
    80. 80. What are somebold ways to buildmore couragein the workplace?
    81. 81. Strategies for Nurturing Courage• Demonstrate courage in ways small and large• Acknowledge fear as a legitimate emotion lest it paralyze people• Cultivate opportunities for people to make an impact• Find excuses to involve people intellectually above their level• Listen with the intent to learn, and be open to influence• Nurture creativity, become an „idea factory‟• Encourage diversity of perspective, opinion• Incubate critical thinking and responsibility• Have a predisposition to act today © Copyright 2013 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
    82. 82. If it is noble . . .Do it because you can.Do it because someone should.Do it because you are here, now.Do it because you are who you are.Do it because otherwise you will always regret not doing it.Do it because, one day at a time, the calendar of life is running out.Do it because no one but you, and nothing but fear, stands in the way.Just be sure to do it, before you cannot. © Copyright 2013 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.

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