SCAR Data Management and Policy

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PRESENTATION FOR THE APECS WORKSHOP AT THE SCAR 2012 OPEN SCIENCE MEETING, PORTLAND, OREGON

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  • Information about datasets deteriorates over time!
  • SCAR Data Management and Policy

    1. 1. SCAR DataManagement and Policy Anton Van de Putte & Bruno Danis APECS Workshop 14 July 2012 SCAR-MarBIN / AntaBIF Royal Belgian Institute for Natural Sciences
    2. 2. Overview• Data concepts & discussion  Types of data  Antarctic Treaty  Fate of data  Who’s data is it anyhow?• The Antarctic data ecosystem  SCADM  GCMD/AMD  SOOS  biodiversity.aq
    3. 3. Types of ‘Data’• Data • values of qualitative or quantitative variables • Field data / experimental data• Metadata • Description of a dataset
    4. 4. « In order to promote international cooperation inscientific investigation in Antarctica, […], the Contracting Parties agree that, to the greatestextent feasible and practicable:[…]Scientific observations and results fromAntarctica shall be exchanged and made freelyavailable. »Antarctic Treaty
    5. 5. What? share my precious data?
    6. 6. Reasons for notpublishing data
    7. 7. Reasons for not publishing data• concerns about patient privacy/endangered species• concerns about future publishing opportunities• desire to retain exclusive rights to data that had taken many years to produce• the amount of effort involved in accessing and sharing datasets• Time in publication process: • 90% scientists should freely share data with other scientists after publication • 30.5% scientists should share data and materials before publication. Tenopir C, Allard S, Douglass K, Aydinoglu AU, Wu L, et al. (2011) Data Sharing by Scientists: Practices and Perceptions. PLoS ONE 6(6): e21101. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0021101 AND REFERENCES HERE-IN
    8. 8. What happens with (meta)data?
    9. 9. Long tail of dark data
    10. 10. Advantages of data publication
    11. 11. Advantages of data publication• re-analysis of data helps verify results data, which is a key part of the scientific process;• different interpretations or approaches to existing data contribute to scientific progress –especially in an interdisciplinary setting;• well-managed, long-term preservation helps retain data integrity;• when data is available, (re-)collection of data is minimized; thus, use of resources is optimized;• data availability provides safeguards against misconduct related to data fabrication and falsification;• replication studies serve as training tools for new generations of researcher Tenopir C, Allard S, Douglass K, Aydinoglu AU, Wu L, et al. (2011) Data Sharing by Scientists: Practices and Perceptions. PLoS ONE 6(6): e21101. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0021101
    12. 12. • Genbank• New NSF policy (2011)It’s becoming mandatory
    13. 13. On Scientist, data and data accessWho’s data is it anyhow?
    14. 14. SCADMStanding Committee on Antarctic Data Management www.scadm.scar.org
    15. 15. SCADM• Members of SC-ADM are usually managers of the National Antarctic Data Centers or a relevant national contact.• Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Canada, China, Finland, Italy, Japan, Malaysia, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Russia, Spain, United Kingdom…..• Making Antarctic Data • open • linked • useful • Interoperable • safe
    16. 16. GCMD AMDGlobal Change Master directory & Antarctic Master Directory gcmd.nasa.gov
    17. 17. GCMD• an extensive directory of descriptive and locational information about data sets and services relevant to global change research.• over 30,000 of these metadata descriptions of datasets, data services and ancillary descriptions from numerous government agencies, research institutions, archives and universities worldwide.• The GCMD contains descriptions of data sets covering all disciplines that produce and use data to help us understand our changing planet.
    18. 18. ADM• The central directory system containing all Antarctic data set descriptions gathered by NADCs.• Facilitate access to data• Maximize the use of data• Disseminate knowledge about Antarctic scientific programs• Avoid duplication of research and data collection• Improve efficiency of Antarctic scientific data management• Facilitate new research through access to existing Antarctic scientific data• Provide a tool for support and decision making for Antarctic operators and scientists• Improve cooperation and interoperability between disciplines and Treaty nations• Allow better oversight of national programs
    19. 19. SOOSSouthern Ocean Observation system www.soos.aq
    20. 20. The Southern Ocean Observing SystemLouise Newman, Mike Meredith, Oscar Schofield On behalf of the SOOS community
    21. 21. BIODIVERSITY.AQ www.biodiversity.aq data.biodiversity.aq ipt.biodiversity.aq afg.biodiversity.aq
    22. 22. data.biodiversity.aq Access to Antarctic Biodiversity data data.biodiversity.aq
    23. 23. data. biodiversity.aq
    24. 24. Data publication tools
    25. 25. ipt.biodiversity.aq Integrated Publishing Toolkit standardize and clean your datamanage primary biodiversity data manage associated metadata choose collaboratorsgenerate and submit a Data Paper
    26. 26. Data flowYour data DwC-A IPT ANTABIF standardize upload publish publish Data Paper
    27. 27. Reward data publishing Metadata document Data Paper
    28. 28. The Data Paper concept• A scholarly journal publication whose primary purpose is to describe a dataset or group of datasets, rather than to report a research investigation.• Benefits of the Data Paper –Scholarly credit to Data Publishers –Describe the data in structured human readable form –Bring the existence of the data to the attention of the scholarly community
    29. 29. Rewarding data publication:ipt.biodiversity.aq Anton Van de PutteRoyal Belgian Institute For Natural Sciences SCAR OSC 16.00, 18 July 2012
    30. 30. Reasons for not publishing data• concerns about patient privacy/endangered species• concerns about future publishing opportunities• desire to retain exclusive rights to data that had taken many years to produce• the amount of effort involved in accessing and sharing datasets• Time in publication process: • 90% scientists should freely share data with other scientists after publication • 30.5% scientists should share data and materials before publication. Tenopir C, Allard S, Douglass K, Aydinoglu AU, Wu L, et al. (2011) Data Sharing by Scientists: Practices and Perceptions. PLoS ONE 6(6): e21101. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0021101 AND REFERENCES HERE-IN
    31. 31. APECS BeNeLux• Thursday 11 October 2012 • Presentations by young scientists and invited • keynote speakers: •Dr. José Xavier, marine biologist and Martha T. Muse (2011) winner •Dr. Frank Pattyn, glaciologist and ice-sheet modeller •Dr. Pete Convey, terrestrial ecologist• Friday 12 October 2012 • 4 workshops led by panels of experts: • Data management • Talking to the media • Presentation skills (poster and oral) • Writing proposals • https://sites.google.com/site/apecsbelgium/

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