Maps and the Geospatial RevolutionLesson 5 – Lecture 1Anthony C. Robinson, Ph.DLead Faculty for Online Geospatial Educatio...
Making Great Maps• Cartography is the art and science of making maps• Maps are always simplifications of reality– Simplifi...
Making Great MapsFrom: Making Maps: A Visual Guide to Map Design for GIS by John Krygier and Denis Wood - makingmaps.owu.edu
Three Key Questions• Who wants a map?– Is it 10 experts, or 20,000+ in a MOOC?• Where will it be seen?– On a small piece o...
Layout Design• One of the first steps in mapmaking is todevelop a balanced layout• Map(s), title, legend, scale bar, sourc...
Layout DesignFrom: Designing Better Maps: A Guide for GIS Users by Cynthia A. Brewer - http://tinyurl.com/kdo25ze
Layout DesignFrom: Designing Better Maps: A Guide for GIS Users by Cynthia A. Brewer - http://tinyurl.com/kdo25ze
Symbolization• Simplifying reality requires Cartographersto use symbols to represent features• Points, lines, and polygons...
Point Symbols
Proportional / Graduated Symbols
Multivariate Symbols
Maps and the Geospatial Revolution www.coursera.org/course/mapsTwitter @MapRevolutionOnline Geospatial Education @ Penn St...
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Maps and the Geospatial Revolution: Lesson 5, Lecture 1

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These are the slides to accompany the first lecture from Lesson 5 of Maps and the Geospatial Revolution on Coursera.

www.coursera.org/course/maps/

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  • The discussion in this lecture regarding symbolism groups together graduated and proportional symbols. The distinction was still not clear to me so I did some research and found myself in Anthony's school (Penn State) in a cartography lesson. This description of the difference between graduated and proportional symbols comes from that lesson: '...in order to differentiate the two modes of application of graduated/proportional symbols in thematic mapping. As mentioned in the Concept Gallery, you can create classed graduated symbol maps. These can be referred to as range-graded graduated symbol maps. In the ArcGIS software you will choose Graduated symbols when you want to create this type of map using classes. When you want to create a graduated/proportional symbol map where the data is not classed, but proportional to the data value, you will choose Proportional symbols.'
    I hope this helps others as it has helped me.
    Thank you Anthony for a terrific class.
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Maps and the Geospatial Revolution: Lesson 5, Lecture 1

  1. 1. Maps and the Geospatial RevolutionLesson 5 – Lecture 1Anthony C. Robinson, Ph.DLead Faculty for Online Geospatial EducationJohnA. Dutton e-Education InstituteAssistant Director, GeoVISTA CenterDepartment of GeographyThe Pennsylvania State UniversityThis content is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported License
  2. 2. Making Great Maps• Cartography is the art and science of making maps• Maps are always simplifications of reality– Simplification is what makes maps helpful when weneed to make a decision, explain patterns, or find abucket of fried chicken• Maps are designed by people (who have intentions)so we have to map responsibly
  3. 3. Making Great MapsFrom: Making Maps: A Visual Guide to Map Design for GIS by John Krygier and Denis Wood - makingmaps.owu.edu
  4. 4. Three Key Questions• Who wants a map?– Is it 10 experts, or 20,000+ in a MOOC?• Where will it be seen?– On a small piece of paper, or in a web map?• What is its purpose?– To explain how my town has changed over time, or to helpsomeone plan a pub crawl?• Each of these questions deserves a well-thought answer beforemapmaking begins
  5. 5. Layout Design• One of the first steps in mapmaking is todevelop a balanced layout• Map(s), title, legend, scale bar, source text,etc… all need to be positioned and sizedrelative to one another• Goal is to shape this general layout design tomatch the answers to three design questions
  6. 6. Layout DesignFrom: Designing Better Maps: A Guide for GIS Users by Cynthia A. Brewer - http://tinyurl.com/kdo25ze
  7. 7. Layout DesignFrom: Designing Better Maps: A Guide for GIS Users by Cynthia A. Brewer - http://tinyurl.com/kdo25ze
  8. 8. Symbolization• Simplifying reality requires Cartographersto use symbols to represent features• Points, lines, and polygons can begraphically manipulated to explain data• Symbolization can emphasize a visualconnection to a real feature, or can be veryabstract
  9. 9. Point Symbols
  10. 10. Proportional / Graduated Symbols
  11. 11. Multivariate Symbols
  12. 12. Maps and the Geospatial Revolution www.coursera.org/course/mapsTwitter @MapRevolutionOnline Geospatial Education @ Penn State www.pennstategis.comThis content is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported License

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