Maps and the Geospatial Revolution: Lesson 2, Lecture 2

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These are the slides to accompany Lecture 2 from Lesson 2 of Maps and the Geospatial Revolution on Coursera.

www.coursera.org/course/maps/

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  • Being a visual learner, I appreciate you using pictures to explain all these terms! It really helps my brain to understand your concepts easier.
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  • Nice Presentation .. People like me with no Geospatial knowledge can understand and learn .. Thank You ..Rob!
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Maps and the Geospatial Revolution: Lesson 2, Lecture 2

  1. 1. Maps and the Geospatial RevolutionLesson 2 – Lecture 2Anthony C. Robinson, Ph.DLead Faculty for Online Geospatial EducationJohnA. Dutton e-Education InstituteAssistant Director, GeoVISTA CenterDepartment of GeographyThe Pennsylvania State UniversityThis content is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported License
  2. 2. Spatial Relationships• You need some ground rules to establish what ispossible when it comes to spatial relationships• SpatialTopology– The set of relationships that spatial features canhave with one another• Let’s consider how people relate to each other inspace
  3. 3. Spatial Relationships• Equals– When we first met eachother, we felt like we were“one.”• Touches– Our first kiss was gentle – notongue.• Overlaps– During our honeymoon we…<deleted>• Contains– For 9 months the baby wasinside (and much quieter).
  4. 4. Spatial Relationships• Disjoint– Later on, we got sick of eachother and watchedTV fromopposite sides of the room.• Covers– The dog sleeps on top of me,creating a huge amount of heat.• Crosses– Although we both know how tofind our way home from thegrocery store, the only routingpoint we have in common is ourdriveway.
  5. 5. Spatial Relationships• What would happen if we ignored them?– Things like Mapquest and Google Maps wouldnever be able to do anything useful• For example– Consider 500 road segments that encompassyour neighborhood and nearby region
  6. 6. Scale• Two key concepts of scale are used in Geography• Map scale– Ratio of the distance on the map to the real distance on theEarth– Large scale = 1/1000 Small scale = 1/10,000,000• Scale of analysis– The specific geographic context used to understand aproblem– Neighborhood, County, State, Country, Continent
  7. 7. What AboutTime?• Spatial Relationships and Scale are reallyimportant, but what would they meanwithout consideringTime?• Almost everything Geographic involves adynamic process of one type or another• Maps often make it hard to see time as anexplicit factor
  8. 8. What AboutTime?
  9. 9. What AboutTime?
  10. 10. What AboutTime?Part of the image is from 2012 from one sensor, and the other part is from2013 from another sensor.
  11. 11. Maps and the Geospatial Revolution www.coursera.org/course/mapsTwitter @MapRevolutionOnline Geospatial Education @ Penn State www.pennstategis.comThis content is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported License

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