Amp Meaning

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Amp Meaning

  1. 1. Art Methods and Practice
  2. 2. Artists create Artists are creative Artists (may or may not) create things Things have meaning Artists create meaning
  3. 3. Our understanding of things changes the world Artists attempt to influence they way things mean Artists attempt to influence the world
  4. 4. Art is not “in” an object or connected to any specific materials or processes
  5. 7. Art poses questions rather then offering answers Art is open ended Because art is open ended, different viewers will get different things out of it. Because art poses questions, better knowledge allows the viewer to get more out of an artwork.
  6. 8. The more we know, the better we understand
  7. 9. MEANING
  8. 10. mean · ing v. To convey or indicate as having a purpose or intention
  9. 11. What does this image mean?
  10. 14. Are meanings always the same? Human Pyramid?
  11. 17. Meaning is not a matter of a dictionary definition Nor is it fixed or stable
  12. 18. Meaning is not a matter of a dictionary definition Nor is it fixed or stable
  13. 19. Meaning is not an essence or attribute of objects or symbols
  14. 20. Meaning is not an essence or attribute of objects or symbols
  15. 21. Meaning is not an essence or attribute of objects or symbols
  16. 22. Meaning is not an essence or attribute of objects or symbols
  17. 23. Shapes, objects, and places don’t mean… Only People Do
  18. 24. The most effective visual artworks attempt to strike a balance between providing enough information so that the intended meaning can occur, but not providing so much information that the viewer is left with nothing to do other then bear passive witness. The circuit of meaning needs to be complete, but never closed, so that the viewer’s participation can serve as the final, electrifying link.
  19. 25. Damien Hirst
  20. 26. The impossibility of death in the mind of someone living.
  21. 27. David Salle
  22. 28. Meanings themselves can be: <ul><li>Literal – taken at face value a spoon is a spoon – a dog is a dog </li></ul><ul><li>Symbolic – representing something else In a poem, a budding flower could mean youth. </li></ul><ul><li>Psychological – intended to influence the mind or emotion remember Damien Hirst’s shark? </li></ul><ul><li>Associative – connected to other thoughts, feelings, ideas, or sensations what do you associate with a pyramid with an eye over it? </li></ul>
  23. 29. <ul><li>Meaning takes into account: </li></ul><ul><li>Vocabulary with which it will be described </li></ul><ul><li>Iconography – symbolic visual systems </li></ul><ul><li>Audience - intended viewers </li></ul><ul><li>Immediacy – think traffic light vs. museum painting </li></ul><ul><li>Stereotypes – preconceptions </li></ul><ul><li>Clichés – an overused expression or predictable treatment of an idea </li></ul><ul><li>Surprise – a shift in stereotype or cliché </li></ul>

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