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How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 1 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 2 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 3 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 4 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 5 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 6 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 7 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 8 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 9 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 10 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 11 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 12 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 13 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 14 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 15 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 16 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 17 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 18 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 19 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 20 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 21 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 22 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 23 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 24 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 25 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 26 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 27 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 28 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 29 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 30 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 31 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 32 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 33 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 34 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 35 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 36 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 37 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 38 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 39 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 40 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 41 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 42 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 43 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 44 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 45 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 46 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 47 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 48 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 49 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 50 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 51 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 52 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 53 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 54 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 55 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 56 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 57 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 58 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 59 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 60 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 61 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 62 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 63 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 64 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 65 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 66 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 67 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 68 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 69 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 70 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 71 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 72 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 73 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 74 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 75 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 76 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 77 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 78 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 79 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 80 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 81 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 82 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 83 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 84 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 85 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 86 How to make a beautiful thesis Slide 87
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How to make a beautiful thesis

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Presentation given to ANU July 2015 about typesetting thesis documents.

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How to make a beautiful thesis

  1. 1. WELCOME TO Making a Beautiful Thesis
  2. 2. HELLO my name is
  3. 3. HELLO my name is I AM A
  4. 4. TODAY I AM TALKING ABOUT Typesetting Information Design (AND OTHER STUFF YOU NEED TO KNOW TO MAKE YOUR THESIS DOCUMENT)
  5. 5. Typesetting
  6. 6. Typesetting is old ARTIST: ROBERT THOM
  7. 7. With strong craft traditions ARTIST: ROBERT THOM
  8. 8. PORTRAIT OF STEVE JOBS, BY SUSAN KARE (DESIGNER OF THE ORIGINAL MAC ICONS) 1983 Traditions that still exist in digital typesetting
  9. 9. Which is why using Word for typsetting is like using this…
  10. 10. …to do this
  11. 11. and why typesetting your thesis will take longer than you think
  12. 12. The Crystal Goblet
  13. 13. ‘Type well used is invisible’ —Beatrice Warde 1930
  14. 14. Here are your specs: International Standard Paper Size A4 (297 x 210mm) 1.5 spacing and presented in a clear and legible font and would normally be expected to be double-sided Left and right margins of no less than 30mm and page numbers that appear inside the margins Pages that are numbered consecutively and clearly Folding diagrams or charts arranged so as to open to the top and right.
  15. 15. So you have some choices to make
  16. 16. Serif OR Sans Serif
  17. 17. Typefaces communicate
  18. 18. The typefaces we read best are the ones we read the most
  19. 19. High contrast between thick and thin strokes is hard to read
  20. 20. Minimal contrast is easier to read
  21. 21. You can pair Serif and Sans Serif
  22. 22. You can pair the same kinds of typefaces Just make sure they are not too similar (OR IT WILL LOOK LIKE A MISTAKE)
  23. 23. TYPEFACES THAT HAVE NO PLACE IN A THESIS: Papyrus Comic Sans Chancery Script Eurostile Copperplate anything art nouveau / art deco style
  24. 24. AVOID IF YOU CAN: Gill Sans Optima Futura Arial Times New Roman
  25. 25. TRY THESE CLASSICS INSTEAD: Garamond Baskerville Cambria Univers Franklin Gothic Helvetica
  26. 26. STAY AWAY FROM SCREEN FONTS INCLUDING: Calibri Trebuchet Geneva Georgia Tahoma (GENERALLY ANY TYPEFACES NAMED AFTER CITIES)
  27. 27. The Rules (OR IF YOU PREFER “GUIDELINES” OR “BEST PRACTICE”)
  28. 28. Do not compress or extend type
  29. 29. Don’t distort images
  30. 30. Don’t use justified type. because it looks terrible especially if you have tight as well as loose lines
  31. 31. Don’t use more than three changes in your type to create emphasis
  32. 32. Avoid widows
  33. 33. Try to leave at least two full lines at the top of a page
  34. 34. Line Stuff Up
  35. 35. Indent or space between, not both
  36. 36. Good typsetting is all about creating hierarchy
  37. 37. Body copy size and leading (line spacing) Margins
  38. 38. me, the exemplar work displayed in that long ago hallway had a presence that was almost palpable, and was often capable of triggering ‘the fear’: a heady mixture of inspiration, envy, and anxiety. This conversation made me wonder, how could I help my online design students ‘feel the fear’ without such a hallway? How can I (or indeed should I?) set the conditions for ‘the fear’ to flourish in the digital hallways of the online school? It was on this last thought that I found myself deeply conflicted. While acknowledg- ing that my colleague was perhaps correct, fear is part of design teacher practice, I found myself wondering if this was a good thing. I wondered too what it may mean if online teaching is a less fear filled practice, and at the same time is (at least in my experience) as effective as onsite teaching. Thus, I loosely framed my initial re- search question as: ‘Is ‘the fear’ in fact necessary to good design teaching practice?’ Although I eventually set out to explore how the online design studio reshapes graphic design teaching more broadly, this question still gives me pause. It is how- ever, best left to research of a more cause-effect kind to take forward. This is a A Head This thesis examines the design studio, common to all art and design disciplines, and the focus of learning and teaching in design education (Schön, 1990). The design studio is both a learning space and a unique pedagogical method (Broadfoot & Bennett, 2003, p. 3) of learning-by-doing, which most scholars trace back to the antecedents of the modern design school: the Beaux Arts and the Bauhaus (Bender 2 SPACES ABOVE = 24pt 1 SPACE BELOW = 12pt
  39. 39. me, the exemplar work displayed in that long ago hallway had a presence that was almost palpable, and was often capable of triggering ‘the fear’: a heady mixture of inspiration, envy, and anxiety. This conversation made me wonder, how could I help my online design students ‘feel the fear’ without such a hallway? How can I (or indeed should I?) set the conditions for ‘the fear’ to flourish in the digital hallways of the online school? It was on this last thought that I found myself deeply conflicted. While acknowledg- ing that my colleague was perhaps correct, fear is part of design teacher practice, I found myself wondering if this was a good thing. I wondered too what it may mean if online teaching is a less fear filled practice, and at the same time is (at least in my experience) as effective as onsite teaching. Thus, I loosely framed my initial re- search question as: ‘Is ‘the fear’ in fact necessary to good design teaching practice?’ Although I eventually set out to explore how the online design studio reshapes graphic design teaching more broadly, this question still gives me pause. It is how- ever, best left to research of a more cause-effect kind to take forward. This is a B Head This thesis examines the design studio, common to all art and design disciplines, and the focus of learning and teaching in design education (Schön, 1990). The design studio is both a learning space and a unique pedagogical method (Broadfoot & Bennett, 2003, p. 3) of learning-by-doing, which most scholars trace back to the antecedents of the modern design school: the Beaux Arts and the Bauhaus (Bender 2 SPACES ABOVE = 24pt 1 SPACE BELOW = 12pt
  40. 40. me, the exemplar work displayed in that long ago hallway had a presence that was almost palpable, and was often capable of triggering ‘the fear’: a heady mixture of inspiration, envy, and anxiety. This conversation made me wonder, how could I help my online design students ‘feel the fear’ without such a hallway? How can I (or indeed should I?) set the conditions for ‘the fear’ to flourish in the digital hallways of the online school? It was on this last thought that I found myself deeply conflicted. While acknowledg- ing that my colleague was perhaps correct, fear is part of design teacher practice, I found myself wondering if this was a good thing. I wondered too what it may mean if online teaching is a less fear filled practice, and at the same time is (at least in my experience) as effective as onsite teaching. Thus, I loosely framed my initial re- search question as: ‘Is ‘the fear’ in fact necessary to good design teaching practice?’ Although I eventually set out to explore how the online design studio reshapes graphic design teaching more broadly, this question still gives me pause. It is how- ever, best left to research of a more cause-effect kind to take forward. This is a C Head This thesis examines the design studio, common to all art and design disciplines, and the focus of learning and teaching in design education (Schön, 1990). The design studio is both a learning space and a unique pedagogical method (Broadfoot & Bennett, 2003, p. 3) of learning-by-doing, which most scholars trace back to the antecedents of the modern design school: the Beaux Arts and the Bauhaus (Bender 1.5 SPACE ABOVE = 18pt 1 SPACE BELOW = 12pt
  41. 41. me, the exemplar work displayed in that long ago hallway had a presence that was almost palpable, and was often capable of triggering ‘the fear’: a heady mixture of inspiration, envy, and anxiety. This conversation made me wonder, how could I help my online design students ‘feel the fear’ without such a hallway? How can I (or indeed should I?) set the conditions for ‘the fear’ to flourish in the digital hallways of the online school? It was on this last thought that I found myself deeply conflicted. While acknowledg- ing that my colleague was perhaps correct, fear is part of design teacher practice, I found myself wondering if this was a good thing. I wondered too what it may mean if online teaching is a less fear filled practice, and at the same time is (at least in my experience) as effective as onsite teaching. Thus, I loosely framed my initial re- search question as: ‘Is ‘the fear’ in fact necessary to good design teaching practice?’ Although I eventually set out to explore how the online design studio reshapes graphic design teaching more broadly, this question still gives me pause. It is how- ever, best left to research of a more cause-effect kind to take forward. This is a D Head This thesis examines the design studio, common to all art and design disciplines, and the focus of learning and teaching in design education (Schön, 1990). The design studio is both a learning space and a unique pedagogical method (Broadfoot & Bennett, 2003, p. 3) of learning-by-doing, which most scholars trace back to the antecedents of the modern design school: the Beaux Arts and the Bauhaus (Bender 1 SPACE ABOVE = 12pt 1 SPACE BELOW = 12pt
  42. 42. me, the exemplar work displayed in that long ago hallway had a presence that was almost palpable, and was often capable of triggering ‘the fear’: a heady mixture of inspiration, envy, and anxiety. This conversation made me wonder, how could I help my online design students ‘feel the fear’ without such a hallway? How can I (or indeed should I?) set the conditions for ‘the fear’ to flourish in the digital hallways of the online school? It was on this last thought that I found myself deeply conflicted. While acknowledg- ing that my colleague was perhaps correct, fear is part of design teacher practice, I found myself wondering if this was a good thing. I wondered too what it may mean if online teaching is a less fear filled practice, and at the same time is (at least in my experience) as effective as onsite teaching. Thus, I loosely framed my initial re- search question as: ‘Is ‘the fear’ in fact necessary to good design teaching practice?’ Although I eventually set out to explore how the online design studio reshapes graphic design teaching more broadly, this question still gives me pause. It is how- ever, best left to research of a more cause-effect kind to take forward. This is an E Head This thesis examines the design studio, common to all art and design disciplines, and the focus of learning and teaching in design education (Schön, 1990). The design studio is both a learning space and a unique pedagogical method (Broadfoot & Bennett, 2003, p. 3) of learning-by-doing, which most scholars trace back to the antecedents of the modern design school: the Beaux Arts and the Bauhaus (Bender 1 SPACE ABOVE = 12pt 1 SPACE BELOW = 12pt
  43. 43. Consistent indent No tab space
  44. 44. Footnotes, page numbers, and bibliography can be in a smaller point size
  45. 45. Possible formula for thesis text with 7 heading levels: Body Copy = 12pt all type sizes are based off this measure (in increments of 2 points) Line Spacing 24pt = 1.5 spaced (32pt would be double-spaced) all spaces are based on this measure Body copy set with no indents, instead uses 1/2 line space as space between (para space) in this case = 12pt* Headings all use the same typeface (which may differ from body text typeface): Section Head = 18pt (8 pts larger than body copy) usually set all caps, on a page by itself Chapter Head = 16pt (4 pts larger than body copy) Bold, looks best with 3 to 5 para spaces below (so 36pt/60pt) A Head (14pt) = set bold, 2 para spaces above, one para space below (24pt above/12 below)** B Head (14pt) = set bold italic, 2 para spaces above, one para space below (24pt above/12 below) C Head (12pt) = Set bold, 1.5 line space above, one para space below (18pt above/12pt below) D Head (12pt) = Set regular, 1 para space above, 1 para below (12pt above and below) E Head (12pt) = Set italic, 1 para space above, 1 para below (12pt above and below) Footnotes and Page Numbers set in body text @ 8–10pt * Paragraphs above headings should be set with no space below. **When one heading is above another, delete the space below the top heading.
  46. 46. Information Design
  47. 47. Your data is bivariate > use a table
  48. 48. Your data is bivariate > use a table Your data is multivariate > use an infographic
  49. 49. THERE ARE ONLY 5 WAYS TO ORGANIZE INFORMATION LATCH
  50. 50. LOCATION ALPHABETICAL TIME CATEGORY HIERARCHY
  51. 51. Pick the Right Tool Bar Charts / compare items
  52. 52. Pick the Right Tool Bar Charts / compare items Line Graphs / show trends over time
  53. 53. Pick the Right Tool Bar Charts / compare items Line Graphs / show trends over time Pie Charts / emphasize proportions
  54. 54. Pick the Right Tool Bar Charts / compare items Line Graphs / show trends over time Pie Charts / emphasize proportions Flowcharts / show process and connectedness
  55. 55. Designing your information
  56. 56. Not just a designer thing
  57. 57. Can be quite important actually
  58. 58. Tables Use one dataset per table
  59. 59. Tables Use one dataset per table Goal is to notice information, NOT the table structure
  60. 60. Tables Use one dataset per table Goal is to notice information, NOT the table structure Use thin lines and light background colors
  61. 61. Use dashes or ellipses for missing data
  62. 62. Use dashes or ellipses for missing data Tints help the eye read across or down
  63. 63. Use dashes or ellipses for missing data Tints help the eye read across or down Use fonts with open counters and/or no serifs
  64. 64. Pie Charts Don’t use an ellipse—it distorts the data
  65. 65. Pie Charts Don’t use an ellipse—it distorts the data Don’t use busy patterns or 3D effect
  66. 66. Pie Charts Don’t use an ellipse—it distorts the data Don’t use busy patterns or 3D effect Make sure colors are tonally contrasting
  67. 67. Line Graphs Background and labels should not overwhelm the lines
  68. 68. Line Graphs Background and labels should not overwhelm the lines Scale allows variation without exageration
  69. 69. Line Graphs Background and labels should not overwhelm the lines Scale allows variation without exageration Doesn’t always need increments
  70. 70. Bar Charts Don’t always need a frame or increment marks
  71. 71. Bar Charts Don’t always need a frame or increment marks Differences of height should be discernible
  72. 72. Thanks for listening, Godspeed!
  73. 73. Any Questions?
  • MaryMares8

    Nov. 26, 2021
  • IngeRie

    Aug. 15, 2018
  • Zeee24

    Jul. 12, 2018
  • jodea

    Jun. 15, 2018
  • JohanFit

    Jan. 30, 2018
  • orangecanton

    Jun. 21, 2017
  • IanHCooper

    Feb. 27, 2017
  • KerryStaples4

    Jan. 8, 2017
  • NicahArielle

    Dec. 7, 2016
  • JulePatrick

    Jun. 12, 2016
  • Jen5lopez

    Sep. 4, 2015

Presentation given to ANU July 2015 about typesetting thesis documents.

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