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1
As you arrive in the webinar room, please answer this
question in the chat pod -
What family stresses related to deploym...
https://learn.extension.org/events/2400
This material is based upon work supported by the National Institute of Food and A...
Connecting military family service providers
to research and to each other
through innovative online programming
www.exten...
Join the Conversation Online!
MFLN Family Transitions
MFLN Family Transitions @MFLNFT
Military Families Learning Network
M...
Dr. Abigail Gewirtz, Ph.D., L.P.
Lindahl Leadership Professor
• Institute for Translational Research in Children’s
Mental ...
Learner Objectives:
• Identify key elements of effective parenting
programs
• Describe family stresses of deployment and
r...
Healthy families,
healthy service members
• Mission readiness requires an uncluttered mind
- Concerns about family associa...
After Deployment Adaptive Parenting Tools
8
What is ADAPT?
• First federally funded randomized study of a parenting
program for military families with school-aged chi...
Why did we start ADAPT?
• We wanted to learn about family resilience
– How do parents reconnect with children after deploy...
ADAPT’s theoretical framework:
Parenting practices mediate impact of
family stressors on child adjustment
• Deployment is ...
The study:
Effectiveness of a web-enhanced
parenting program for military families
• 2010-2016
• 336 NG/R families recruit...
Modifications to parent training model for
military families: ADAPT
• ADAPT is a 14-week long, web-enhanced, group-based
p...
Modifications continued…
• Attention to military culture and values (in group process,
in tailored video material, role pl...
ADAPT program content
6 key parenting skills
– Teaching through encouragement
– Emotion socialization (added)
– Positive i...
16
Time to Chat
Questions? Thoughts?
Share with us in the chat pod!
Who are the families in ADAPT?
• 608 adults and 336 children in 336 families in Minnesota
National Guard, and in Army, Nav...
Who are the families continued…
• Number of deployments (ever): 1-13 for men, 1-5 for
women
• Number of deployments since ...
Who are the military and deployed mothers
in ADAPT?
80 military mothers
– 52 in dual partner military families
– 28 just m...
Deployed vs. non-deployed mothers in ADAPT
• We analyzed data from 181 mothers who completed baseline
data collection
• 34...
21
22
Interviews with deployed mothers
• At completion of ADAPT study, I invite all deployed
mothers to an individual interview
...
Interview questions
Chronological approach: life as a mother and a spouse
– Prior to the first deployment
– From knowing y...
Interview findings/themes
• Deployment is something you train for
– Service and sacrifice/call of duty
– Ambivalence – ser...
26
Time to Chat
Randomization
• 60% families (N=207) randomly assigned to
ADAPT condition
• 40% families (N=129) to ‘services as usual’ –
...
ADAPT groups
• Held in churches,
community centers,
colleges across
Minnesota typically within
a 45-60 minute drive for
pa...
ADAPT group participation
(Gewirtz, Pinna, Hanson, & Brockberg, 2014)
• Of the 207 families in the ADAPT condition, 70% sh...
Average General Satisfaction
Mean:
3.85 - men
3.97 - women
0 1 2 3 4
Some Very Little Some Quite a Lot Very Much
30
“Giving Effective Directions”
31
• Watch this 5-minute clip from ADAPT -
https://youtu.be/jM_q5yD6KNY
• Join us back here ...
In the chat pod,
please share your thoughts
about the video.
Time to Chat
32
Preliminary follow-up data
We evaluated the effectiveness of the ADAPT program
at 6 and 12 months post-baseline
Examined t...
Findings
Results indicate that, at posttest, the ADAPT
intervention significantly improved parents’:
– Parenting self-effi...
Findings continued…
• At one year post baseline, improvements in parenting
efficacy as a result of the program led to:
– R...
36
Time to Chat
What is one significant thing
you learned today?
ADAPT4U
New study funded by the Dept of Defense
(Military Operational Medical Research
Program/MOMRP) to evaluate differen...
38
Acknowledgements
• ADAPT study funded by NIDA (R01 DA 030114; 2010-2015
(associated funding from SAMHSA’s National Child T...
Thank you
Abi Gewirtz:
agewirtz@umn.edu
ADAPT’s website:
Adapt4u.umn.edu
40
Evaluation and Certificate of
Completion
MFLN Family Transitions is offering a certificate
of completion for today’s webin...
Family Transitions Upcoming Event
42
Building Community Partnerships to Meet
Transitioning Service Members & Family Needs
...
www.extension.org/62581
43This material is based upon work supported by the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, U....
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Parenting During Times of Transition Part 2 - Promoting Effective Parenting During Deployment and Reintegration

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This webinar will feature what has been learned from the ADAPT (After Deployment Adaptive Parenting Tools) Project. The presenter will identify how to best support military families coping with the stress of deployment and reintegration with a focus on parenting skills, couple relationships, problem-solving, and effective communication.

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Parenting During Times of Transition Part 2 - Promoting Effective Parenting During Deployment and Reintegration

  1. 1. 1 As you arrive in the webinar room, please answer this question in the chat pod - What family stresses related to deployment and reintegration do you see in your work with military families?
  2. 2. https://learn.extension.org/events/2400 This material is based upon work supported by the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the Office of Family Readiness Policy, U.S. Department of Defense under Award Numbers 2014-48770-22587 and 2015-48770-24368. Parenting During Times of Transition (Part 2) – Promoting Effective Parenting During Deployment & Reintegration
  3. 3. Connecting military family service providers to research and to each other through innovative online programming www.extension.org/militaryfamilies MFLN Intro 3 Sign up for webinar email notifications at www.extension.org/62831
  4. 4. Join the Conversation Online! MFLN Family Transitions MFLN Family Transitions @MFLNFT Military Families Learning Network MFLN Family Transitions FT SMS Icons 4 MFLN Group https://www.linkedin.com/groups/8409844
  5. 5. Dr. Abigail Gewirtz, Ph.D., L.P. Lindahl Leadership Professor • Institute for Translational Research in Children’s Mental Health at the University of Minnesota • Professor in the Department of Family Social Science and the Institute of Child Development Today’s Presenter 5 Research focuses on the development, effectiveness testing, and implementation of targeted prevention programs that promote child resilience among highly stressed families including those affected by military deployment and war
  6. 6. Learner Objectives: • Identify key elements of effective parenting programs • Describe family stresses of deployment and reintegration • Describe what makes a program evidence-based • Describe why ADAPT is an evidence-based program 6
  7. 7. Healthy families, healthy service members • Mission readiness requires an uncluttered mind - Concerns about family associated with poorer wellbeing during and after deployment • Much past research on influence of family members on each other’s wellness – Parents with psychological or parenting challenges have children with more problems • The good news: improving parenting skills leads to improvements in other family domains….. – Using evidence-based family programming 7
  8. 8. After Deployment Adaptive Parenting Tools 8
  9. 9. What is ADAPT? • First federally funded randomized study of a parenting program for military families with school-aged children, and the first parenting study of National Guard families • Tests a parenting program (ADAPT) designed specifically for military families via a randomized controlled trial, and at the same time aims to learn about how families navigate deployment and reintegration • 14-week group-based parenting program that is now also available in 2 versions  online-only  individual tele-health 9
  10. 10. Why did we start ADAPT? • We wanted to learn about family resilience – How do parents reconnect with children after deployment? – How do mothers and fathers parent in the wake of deployment? – How can we support families after deployment? • No research-based parenting programs for deployed families with school-aged children • Fewer resources for the NGR than active-duty service members 10
  11. 11. ADAPT’s theoretical framework: Parenting practices mediate impact of family stressors on child adjustment • Deployment is a family stressor • Separations from family and children (MacDermid, 2006) • Combat related stressors (Cozza et al., 2005) • Reintegration is a key transition point • Transitions offer special prevention opportunities • Parenting practices mediate the impact of deployment stress on child outcomes (Patterson, 1982) 11
  12. 12. The study: Effectiveness of a web-enhanced parenting program for military families • 2010-2016 • 336 NG/R families recruited; each family followed for two years – Random assignment to a parenting program (ADAPT; 60%) or parenting services-as-usual (web and print resources; 40%) – Parents and teachers complete online questionnaires, and observational, self-report, and physiological data are gathered from families (parents & children) at baseline, 6, 12, and 24 months. – Outcomes: parenting practices, couple adjustment, child adjustment (behavior and emotional problems, substance use, peer adjustment), parent emotion regulation, parent emotion socialization 12
  13. 13. Modifications to parent training model for military families: ADAPT • ADAPT is a 14-week long, web-enhanced, group-based program for troops returning from deployment who have at least one child aged 5-12yrs – Weekly, provided in the community, 2hrs long, groups began Sept 2011 – Online ADAPT is available to participants for 12 months • Modifications include: attention to emotion regulation in family communication (emotion socialization) – Mindfulness training (to address experiential avoidance associated with combat stress symptoms) – Emotion coaching (esp. responding to children’s anxiety) 13
  14. 14. Modifications continued… • Attention to military culture and values (in group process, in tailored video material, role plays, etc) • Emphasis on united parenting front (for two-parent families) • Addressing common barriers to participation – Web-component to increase involvement in group program by other caregivers, spouses, etc. – Stand alone online ADAPT is under development (Marquez, Gewirtz, & DeGarmo, 2013-2015) 14
  15. 15. ADAPT program content 6 key parenting skills – Teaching through encouragement – Emotion socialization (added) – Positive involvement with children – Family problem-solving – Monitoring and supervision – Effective discipline Groups augmented with online materials for midweek – Skill and practice videos – Mindfulness practices downloadable to MP3/smartphones – Home practice and information handouts – Short quizzes/ knowledge checks Taught via: – Role play – Discussion – Practice 15
  16. 16. 16 Time to Chat Questions? Thoughts? Share with us in the chat pod!
  17. 17. Who are the families in ADAPT? • 608 adults and 336 children in 336 families in Minnesota National Guard, and in Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, and Coast Guard Reserve Units • 57 deployed mothers; 282 deployed fathers • Married: 9.8 years on average (SD = 5.3) • Mean number of marriages: 1.2 • Average number of children: 2.39 (SD = 1) • Mean family income: $71,281 (SD = $34,761) 17
  18. 18. Who are the families continued… • Number of deployments (ever): 1-13 for men, 1-5 for women • Number of deployments since 2001: 1-6 for men, 1-5 for women (mean = 1.96 for men, 1.4 for women) • Deployment status by family – Male deployed = 282 – Female deployed = 31 – Both deployed = 26 • For more information on baseline data, and intervention process, see Gewirtz et al., 2013, 2014, in press (moms, dads, overall parenting) 18
  19. 19. Who are the military and deployed mothers in ADAPT? 80 military mothers – 52 in dual partner military families – 28 just mothers in military – 44 Army NG; 11 Air NG; 16 reserves, 9 other 57 mothers have deployed to OIF or OEF; 51 were gone 6-24 months; 44 deployed once 19
  20. 20. Deployed vs. non-deployed mothers in ADAPT • We analyzed data from 181 mothers who completed baseline data collection • 34 deployed, 147 never deployed • Controlling for marital status, deployed mothers reported significantly higher distress (PTSD and depression symptoms) and difficulties in emotion regulation than never deployed mothers • Deployed mothers had more adverse past year life events • But no differences in reports of couple or child adjustment (Gewirtz et al, 2014, Professional Psychology, Research and Practice) 20
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  23. 23. Interviews with deployed mothers • At completion of ADAPT study, I invite all deployed mothers to an individual interview – Coffee shop or woman’s choice of location – No longer than 45-60 mins – Videotaped, with a copy given to the woman to keep • We have conducted 6 interviews to-date • About ¼-1/3 of eligible women decline to participate – ‘this was a traumatic time and I don’t want to talk about it’ • Majority report that this is a good opportunity to share their experiences 23
  24. 24. Interview questions Chronological approach: life as a mother and a spouse – Prior to the first deployment – From knowing you were to deploy until the actual leaving • Telling kids about deployment – During deployment • Communication with the family • Safety and feeling threatened – After returning to the family • Reunification with children and spouse 24
  25. 25. Interview findings/themes • Deployment is something you train for – Service and sacrifice/call of duty – Ambivalence – service vs. leaving kids • Attitudes of friends, family and community members towards deployed mothers – Different attitudes towards men who deployed vs. women • Feeling threatened – Danger is on-base • Reintegration – Jumping right back into parenting – No transition time 25
  26. 26. 26 Time to Chat
  27. 27. Randomization • 60% families (N=207) randomly assigned to ADAPT condition • 40% families (N=129) to ‘services as usual’ – web and print materials about parenting • Families assigned in cohorts based on in- home assessment date • Families in the intervention/ADAPT condition were invited to the next group to start that matched their schedule and location – 7 cohorts, 29 groups delivered 27
  28. 28. ADAPT groups • Held in churches, community centers, colleges across Minnesota typically within a 45-60 minute drive for participants • Childcare activities and pizza dinner provided • Families reimbursed for travel ($10/family) • Drawings to encourage on-time attendance and homework completion • Groups lasted 2 hrs, usually on a weekday evening • Group facilitators were National Guard or military-related individuals (e.g. VA, spouses, etc) and civilian human service professionals • Families completed satisfaction surveys at the end of each group session (anonymous, IDs only, in sealed envelope) 28
  29. 29. ADAPT group participation (Gewirtz, Pinna, Hanson, & Brockberg, 2014) • Of the 207 families in the ADAPT condition, 70% showed up at least once • An additional 7% families accessed online components only • Almost half of the families attended at least seven sessions • Slightly greater mother (53%) than father (47%) participation • Of the 145 families who attended at least one session, 71% came to seven or more sessions • 48% completed at least one home practice assignment; 52% used online tools 29
  30. 30. Average General Satisfaction Mean: 3.85 - men 3.97 - women 0 1 2 3 4 Some Very Little Some Quite a Lot Very Much 30
  31. 31. “Giving Effective Directions” 31 • Watch this 5-minute clip from ADAPT - https://youtu.be/jM_q5yD6KNY • Join us back here once you’re finished and raise your hand to indicate you ready for discussion.
  32. 32. In the chat pod, please share your thoughts about the video. Time to Chat 32
  33. 33. Preliminary follow-up data We evaluated the effectiveness of the ADAPT program at 6 and 12 months post-baseline Examined the program’s effect on several dimensions of parenting: – Parenting self-efficacy (T2) – Parent reports of ineffective discipline (T3) – Observed parenting (T3) Recently examined program effects on child outcomes (T3) - Behavior problems and adaptive skills (parent report) And on parents’ PTSD symptoms 33
  34. 34. Findings Results indicate that, at posttest, the ADAPT intervention significantly improved parents’: – Parenting self-efficacy (mothers and fathers) – Reports of ineffective discipline (mothers and fathers) – Observed parenting in mothers and in higher-risk fathers – PTSD symptoms in mothers and in higher-risk fathers 34
  35. 35. Findings continued… • At one year post baseline, improvements in parenting efficacy as a result of the program led to: – Reductions in mothers’ and fathers’ PTSD and depression symptoms, and reductions in suicidal ideation (Gewirtz, DeGarmo, & Zamir, in press) – Improvements in children’s peer adjustment (Piehler, Ausherman, Gliske, & Gewirtz, under review) • Preliminary child behavior data indicate behavior improvements in children in the ADAPT condition at one year post-baseline 35
  36. 36. 36 Time to Chat What is one significant thing you learned today?
  37. 37. ADAPT4U New study funded by the Dept of Defense (Military Operational Medical Research Program/MOMRP) to evaluate different formats of the ADAPT program Online only Group-based Tele health Recruiting now! Families with 5-12 year olds, where at least one parent has deployed in service of OIF or OEF MN Metro area, Duluth, and Michigan (Grand Rapids, Kalamazoo, Battle Creek) Go to www.adapt4u.umn.edu 37
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  39. 39. Acknowledgements • ADAPT study funded by NIDA (R01 DA 030114; 2010-2015 (associated funding from SAMHSA’s National Child Traumatic Stress Network (SM56177); & NICHD R43 HD 066896) • Program officers: Eve Reider and Belinda Sims • Hundreds of National Guard and Reserve (NG/R) families • National Guard command and communication staff • Co-investigators: Drs. Melissa Polusny, Marion Forgatch, Dave DeGarmo • Research staff and facilitators 39
  40. 40. Thank you Abi Gewirtz: agewirtz@umn.edu ADAPT’s website: Adapt4u.umn.edu 40
  41. 41. Evaluation and Certificate of Completion MFLN Family Transitions is offering a certificate of completion for today’s webinar. To receive a certificate of completion, please complete the evaluation and post-test at: https://vte.co1.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_9Gl6TWHJMhX9jX7 41
  42. 42. Family Transitions Upcoming Event 42 Building Community Partnerships to Meet Transitioning Service Members & Family Needs • March 31, 2016 • Time: 11AM Eastern • Location: https://learn.extension.org/events/2410 For more information on MFLN Family Transitions go to: http://blog/.extension.org/militaryfamilies/life-cycle-transition-support
  43. 43. www.extension.org/62581 43This material is based upon work supported by the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the Office of Family Readiness Policy, U.S. Department of Defense under Award Numbers 2014-48770-22587 and 2015-48770-24368.

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