Pres historic royal palaces

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  • Works with local communities to develop new audiences, specifically those who might otherwise be excluded by poverty, language, age, disability or cultural distance.
  • Team members specialise in working with a particular audience group
  • Bespoke projects. These are tailored to meet the needs of very specific groups e.g. refugees, young people not in employment, education or training, disadvantaged families or new citizens. They include consultation and advocacy through the Access and Youth panels and also our Family Forum. They are concentrated and personal engagement over a medium to long period of time, are highly valued by the participants and have the most potential for sustainability, advancement of skills and social benefits, and positive impact on individuals. Practical examples might be reminiscence leading to web or printed material; citizenship ceremonies, or art-related activities – this group designed their own tea service based on the blue and white china of Mary II. Public events provide opportunities to showcase exhibitions and promote HRP to a broader and new audience, increasing our presence and relevance in the local area. This photograph shoes a free dance project exploring the dance styles throughout the history of Kensington Palace. To accompany these activities we will produce tailored resources that offer historical and general information on HRP sites or stories. They may be distributed locally, at public events or displayed in local community areas such as libraries. Resources include banners, booklets and English as a Second or other language worksheets. Talks and workshops offsite are aimed mainly at people who cannot visit us e.g. in care homes, hospitals or community centres. They can still link to our mainstream projects – this one is inspired by an up-coming exhibition of state beds, provisionally called ‘In bed with the King’.
  • Increasing delivery in testing times Ongoing participation in exhibitions and displays - community content Community rooms at all palaces in next three years Community group leader training
  • Pres historic royal palaces

    1. 2. Historic Royal Palaces - 5 unoccupied royal palaces, last lived in by royalty in the 19 th century - Owned by Queen Elizabeth II on behalf of the Nation (which means that the present Queen cannot sell them, but must keep them for future monarchs) - Previously they were looked after by the Government, but are now looked after by an independent charity established in 1998 - We receive no money from the Government or the Royal Family, so we are responsible for raising the money to care for the palaces and open them to the public
    2. 3. TOWER OF LONDON
    3. 4. HAMPTON COURT PALACE
    4. 5. BANQUETING HOUSE
    5. 6. KENSINGTON PALACE
    6. 7. KEW PALACE
    7. 8. How are we run? - By a Board of Trustees that consists of a Chairman and eleven Trustees, chosen for their skills and experience. All are non-executive part-time and unpaid. - The Chief Executive, Michael Day, is accountable to the Board of Trustees for the performance of Historic Royal Palaces and ultimately to Parliament for the public assets in our care. - He chairs an Executive Board of eight directors who represent the different departments that help manage the palaces. Departments: Chief Executive Finance Conservation & Learning Human Resources Communications & Development Tower Group Palaces Group Retail
    8. 9. In 2010/11 we welcomed over three and a quarter million visitors to our palaces. Tower - 2,409,000 Hampton Court – 554,000 Banqueting House – 27,000 Kensington – 245,000 Kew – 30,000
    9. 10. Our Cause <ul><li>We have a Cause and at its heart is the challenge to help everyone explore the story of how monarchs and people have shaped society in some of the greatest palaces ever built. </li></ul>
    10. 11. <ul><li>Our Cause is about reaching everyone, not just those who visit now </li></ul><ul><li>It removes economic and cultural barriers to accessing the palaces </li></ul><ul><li>It helps build good relations within the palaces’ localities </li></ul><ul><li>we learn how to interact with different audiences </li></ul>Outreach & Community Involvement (OCI) exists because:
    11. 12. Audience focussed team delivering with the help of community partners to … … around 28,500 people in 2011
    12. 13. Our current programme: Four main categories
    13. 14. <ul><li>Our objectives: </li></ul><ul><li>Consultation and advocacy – considering the views of others </li></ul><ul><li>Ensuring we really welcome all our visitors </li></ul><ul><li>Through participation making heritage relevant to the individual </li></ul><ul><li>Learning and social outcomes </li></ul><ul><li>Making an impact on the lives of others </li></ul>
    14. 15. Here to share and learn new things …

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