"The Polar Bear Book" Chapter 4

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A presentation illustrating the major concepts of Chapter 4 in "Information Architecture for the World Wide Web" by Lou Rosenfeld and Peter Morville. Created for a class presentation for SI 658, Information Architecture, at the University of Michigan School of Information.

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"The Polar Bear Book" Chapter 4

  1. 1. The Anatomy of an Information Architecture Chapter 4 Information Architecture for the World Wide Web Andrea Wiggins
  2. 2. Visualizing Information Architecture <ul><li>Why visualize? </li></ul>
  3. 3. Visualizing Information Architecture <ul><li>Why visualize? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Seeing is believing </li></ul></ul>
  4. 4. Visualizing Information Architecture <ul><li>Why visualize? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Seeing is believing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>IA is abstract </li></ul></ul>
  5. 5. Visualizing Information Architecture <ul><li>Why visualize? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Seeing is believing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>IA is abstract </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Need to “sell” IA work to the client </li></ul></ul>
  6. 6. Visualizing Information Architecture <ul><li>Why visualize? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Seeing is believing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>IA is abstract </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Need to “sell” IA work to the client </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>First two reasons make sense because good IA is often invisible. Third reason is a practical reality. </li></ul></ul>
  7. 7. Visualizing Information Architecture <ul><li>Why visualize? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Seeing is believing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>IA is abstract </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Need to “sell” IA work to the client </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>First two reasons make sense because good IA is often invisible. Third reason is a practical reality. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Let’s see some examples… </li></ul></ul>
  8. 8. <ul><li>Navigation </li></ul><ul><li>Search </li></ul><ul><li>Navigation </li></ul><ul><li>Search & Navigation </li></ul><ul><li>Organization </li></ul><ul><li>Labeling </li></ul><ul><li>Navigation </li></ul>Example: Architectural Components
  9. 9. Example: Answering User’s Questions <ul><li>Where am I? </li></ul><ul><li>Where else can I go in this site? </li></ul><ul><li>Where am I within this site? </li></ul><ul><li>How much caffeinated beverage will kill me? </li></ul><ul><li>Are there other fun ways to overdose on caffeine? </li></ul><ul><li>What have other people said about death by caffeine? </li></ul><ul><li>I know what I’m looking for; how do I search for it? </li></ul><ul><li>Where can I find past posts about caffeine-induced mortality? </li></ul><ul><li>What other types of information can I find here? </li></ul>
  10. 10. Information Architecture Components Morville & Rosenfeld Style
  11. 11. Information Architecture Components Morville & Rosenfeld Style <ul><li>Organization Systems: How we categorize information </li></ul>
  12. 12. Information Architecture Components Morville & Rosenfeld Style <ul><li>Organization Systems: How we categorize information </li></ul><ul><li>Labeling Systems: How we represent information </li></ul>
  13. 13. Information Architecture Components Morville & Rosenfeld Style <ul><li>Organization Systems: How we categorize information </li></ul><ul><li>Labeling Systems: How we represent information </li></ul><ul><li>Navigation Systems: How we browse or move through information </li></ul>
  14. 14. Information Architecture Components Morville & Rosenfeld Style <ul><li>Organization Systems: How we categorize information </li></ul><ul><li>Labeling Systems: How we represent information </li></ul><ul><li>Navigation Systems: How we browse or move through information </li></ul><ul><li>Searching Systems: How we search information </li></ul>
  15. 15. Information Architecture Components An Alternate (but Equivalent) Universe
  16. 16. <ul><li>Browsing Aids: present users with pre-defined paths through a site </li></ul>Information Architecture Components An Alternate (but Equivalent) Universe
  17. 17. <ul><li>Browsing Aids: present users with pre-defined paths through a site </li></ul><ul><li>Search Aids: creates customized results to user-defined queries </li></ul>Information Architecture Components An Alternate (but Equivalent) Universe
  18. 18. <ul><li>Browsing Aids: present users with pre-defined paths through a site </li></ul><ul><li>Search Aids: creates customized results to user-defined queries </li></ul><ul><li>Content & Tasks: user destinations, not how they get to them </li></ul>Information Architecture Components An Alternate (but Equivalent) Universe
  19. 19. <ul><li>Browsing Aids: present users with pre-defined paths through a site </li></ul><ul><li>Search Aids: creates customized results to user-defined queries </li></ul><ul><li>Content & Tasks: user destinations, not how they get to them </li></ul><ul><li>“ Invisible” Components: key background processes </li></ul>Information Architecture Components An Alternate (but Equivalent) Universe
  20. 20. Browsing Aids <ul><li>Site-wide Navigation Systems (A) </li></ul><ul><li>Local Navigation Systems (B) </li></ul><ul><li>Contextual Linking Systems (C) </li></ul><ul><li>Organization Systems (D) </li></ul><ul><li>Sitemaps/TOCs (E) </li></ul><ul><li>Site Indexes </li></ul><ul><li>Site Guides* </li></ul><ul><li>Site Wizards* </li></ul>
  21. 21. Search Aids <ul><li>Search Interface (1) </li></ul><ul><li>Query Language </li></ul><ul><li>Retrieval Algorithms </li></ul><ul><li>Search Zones (2) </li></ul><ul><li>Search Results (3) </li></ul>
  22. 22. Content & Tasks <ul><li>Identifiers (1) </li></ul><ul><li>Lists (2) </li></ul><ul><li>Chunks (3) </li></ul><ul><li>Embedded Links (4) </li></ul><ul><li>Headings </li></ul><ul><li>Embedded Metadata </li></ul><ul><li>Sequential Aids </li></ul>
  23. 23. “Invisible” Components <ul><li>Controlled Vocabularies </li></ul><ul><li>Thesauri </li></ul><ul><li>Rule Sets </li></ul>

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