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Market Levels
Haute Couture 
Luxury Fashion 
Bridge Brands 
Diffusion Lines 
High Street 
Economy Brands 
Trickle down effect 
Inspirati...
Haute Couture & Couture
Haute Couture & Couture Began in the 19th Century. Haute Couture translates as ‘High 
Sewing’- where standards and quality...
Luxury Fashion
Luxury Fashion “Luxury is not easy to define. The high-quality and creative ready-to-wear is identified as a 
luxury symbo...
Bridge Brands
Bridge Brands 
Bridge brands originated in the 70s were a gap in the market was identified. 
High quality garments without...
Diffusion Brands
Diffusion Lines 
Diffusion line are predominantly global luxury brands were they open up an secondary lines 
to bring in a...
High street
High street 
High street refers to a chain of brands available in high streets nation wide is most major 
cities and towns...
Economy Brands
Economy Brands 
During the recession in 2008 the economy market according to Just-style was worth 
50bn Euros across Europ...
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Market levels

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Market Levels

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Market levels

  1. 1. Market Levels
  2. 2. Haute Couture Luxury Fashion Bridge Brands Diffusion Lines High Street Economy Brands Trickle down effect Inspiration from Couture and luxury fashion filters down the triangle, this is where levels such as high street take inspiration for their ranges to sell to the masses. Bubble up effect Street and culture create a momentum and become a trend, this rises through he hierarchy were high end designers take inspiration and create their response. A prime example of this is punk culture of the 70’s.
  3. 3. Haute Couture & Couture
  4. 4. Haute Couture & Couture Began in the 19th Century. Haute Couture translates as ‘High Sewing’- where standards and quality are above all else. The term ‘haute couture’ is protected by law and governed by the Chambre Syndicale de la Haute Couture in Paris. To be classified as a bona fine haute couturier a fashion house must create made to order garments for private. An unwritten rule suggests limiting sales of any garment of over £100,000 to one per continent to ensure the exclusivity that clients expect . Lesser priced garments are usually confined to no more than 3 per continent. Some pieces taking up to 700 hours to make 2 COLLECTIONS SHOWING July & January Recognised haute couture establishments : Chanel, Dior, Jean Paul Gautier, Valentiono, Giorgio Armani, Jean- Louis Scerrer, Ellie Saab, Dominique Sirop, Stephane Rolland and Franck Sorbier • They must have a full-time workshop in Paris that employs no fewer than twenty staff. • Estimated 2,000 female customers globally • LOSS LEADER - Used as a marketing tool - raising status and desirability of the brand. • Couture for Dior only accounts for 4% of over all LVMH sales.
  5. 5. Luxury Fashion
  6. 6. Luxury Fashion “Luxury is not easy to define. The high-quality and creative ready-to-wear is identified as a luxury symbol. And it is, of course, from a business and brand placement point of view, addressed to a high consumer range. Luxury is research, the chance to experience new routes, to find new and not predictable or already seen solutions. Experimentations are luxury. Craftsmanship is luxury. A product is luxe when it is handmade, tailored for few. Luxury meaning exclusiveness. “ By Franca Sozzani Key Players: Louise Vuitton, Herems, Gucci, Prada and Burberry 2 COLLECTIONS SHOWING September & February Pre Spring/Summer, -Spring /Summer & Pre Fall -Autumn / Winter LVHM Louis Vuitton Celine Loewe Berluti Kenzo Givenchy Marc Jacobs Fendi Emilio Pucci Thomas Pink Donna Karan Edun NOWNESS LoroPiana Nicholas Kirkwood KERING Gucci Balenciaga StelleMcCartney Girard-Perregaux BottegaVeneta Brioni Sergio Rossi Jeanrichard Saint Laurent Christopher Kane Boucheron Pomellato Alexander McQueen McQ Dodo Qeelin Richemont Cartier Van Cleef& Arpels Piaget Vacheron Constantin Jaeger –Les Coultre IWC Panerai Montblanc Target Market : • £100,000 + Earners • 30+ China has become the biggest buyer of luxury fashion, During Gold Week Luxury brands generate about 40%- 60% of their October Sales during this period. This rise has lead luxury brands to make clothes in generally smaller sizes to fit predominantly Chinese women’s frames. Fashion Capitals : London, Paris, Milan, New York BRICs : Brazil, Russia, India, China MINT: Mexico, Indonesia, Nigeria, Turkey In 2004, emerging countries had a share of only about 7 percent in the luxury apparel market; today they account for 14 percent of the market, and by 2025 they will have approximately 25 • China is the largest consumer of Luxury goods • 99% of Louis Vuitton out there is fake • At the end of each year, Louis Vuitton burns all their leftovers
  7. 7. Bridge Brands
  8. 8. Bridge Brands Bridge brands originated in the 70s were a gap in the market was identified. High quality garments without the price tag associated with a glorified designer or a designer name. “Just as presenting a special-offer voucher at a restaurant in which you couldn't otherwise afford to dine can take the shine off the whole experience, there was once a time when procuring a piece of your favourite designer's handiwork involved a depressing level of compromise. "Obviously, in a recession that becomes more relevant because even people who bought designer in the past are looking for a realistic way to stay in touch with luxury. But it works in different directions – for designers, diffusion was originally a way to open up their brand to a wider audience." Curran agrees, however, that consumers nowadays are too design-savvy to accept the uninspired wares that used to pass for diffusion lines: "I think D&G is an excellent example of the total repositioning. Until five years ago that line was under license and it had become something that was really nothing to do with the main line. It was heavily logo-ed, a lot of denim, streetwear almost, which is so different from the glamour and polish of the ' brand – chalk and cheeseIn fact, so keen are designers and retailers to move away from the old categories, that most prefer to avoid the "d" word when christening these.” Key Players: Cos, Whistles, Ted Baker, Sandro, Reiss, Coach, Whistles and Joseph. Rhiannon Harries, The Idenpendant Target Market : • 30+ • Middle class • Disposable income For those who may not be able to afford luxury brands but • Inhabit family heritage still wanting to purchases items that are of a high-quality and a sense of craftsmanship. Brand themselves as Entry Price: prestige to the masses as consumers with a low budget still • Eg. Top starts from view luxury as something they are entitled too. around £50 (Luxury brand quality without the avant garde sensibilities)
  9. 9. Diffusion Brands
  10. 10. Diffusion Lines Diffusion line are predominantly global luxury brands were they open up an secondary lines to bring in a wider market at much more accessible prices. It allows designers to stay in the radar with a much younger market who look up to these designers. This also allows them to maintain high profits and keep lucrative sponsorship deals. Key Players: SEE by Chloe RED by Valentino DRKSHDW by Rick Owens DKNY by Donna Karan SIMPLY VERA by Vera Wang VERSACE, MARNI, MAISON MARTIN MARGIELA for H&M In some cases, the lower prices and appeal to a younger consumer produce a more playful aesthetic. "Designers can be a bit more adventurous, so you get the same handwriting, but with a few more quirks. It's fun, but with all the design integrity and quality you'd expect from a high-end label," says Barr, who cites Marc by Marc Jacobs as a prime example and arguable template for others since its launch in 2001. At the Marc by Marc Jacobs store in London's Mount Street you can get in on the action with only a quid to your name thanks to his cute lipstick-shaped pens and friendship bracelets. All of which have been phenomenally successful – not to mention lucrative – without damaging the kudos of his other work one bit. Example of price comparison between luxury brand and their diffusion line MAISON MARTIN MARGIELA £315 MM6 MAISON MARTIN MARGIELA £160 Target Market : • 18-30 • Regular luxury brand buyers who want to change up their wardrobe • Big fans of the brand and designer who want more products for their money. Even though at time clothing is cheaper, (sometime chicer but not cheaper) there has been articles claiming that the quality isn’t of the same standard like the luxury brand which taking away the ‘specialness’ away from the product’.
  11. 11. High street
  12. 12. High street High street refers to a chain of brands available in high streets nation wide is most major cities and towns, some also international such as Zara and Gap. Key Players: GAP, Warehouse, Monsoon, M&S, Topshop, Burton, Dorothy Perkins, Zara, H&M and River Island Style : High street brands such as Zara and Topshop often pick up on the catwalk FORDs which are usually crowd pleasing accessible trends and water it down for them to be made at a much cheaper price . Eg. Such as busy embroidery is simplified into prints. Entry Price: Since the recession and economy brands took off with a bang High Street brands have increased their prices. Their basics, for example Topshop can still start from around £4-6 however their main collections, usually inspired from the seasons catwalk, clothing starts at around £25 and can sometimes reach the hundreds. Target Market: These are brands which produce for the masses , readily available for anyone and everyone who is on a limited budget but still wants to keep in trend. Problem: “According to new figures the decline of the high street has accelerated in the first half of the year. Traditional goods retailers such as shoe and clothes shops saw a net decline of 365 in the first half while leisure chains - encompassing food, beverage and entertainment - grew outlets by a net 215. It reflects the reality that shops need to become experiential destinations.” Customers are looking for more of an experience whilst shopping however the aim of the high street is to sell clothing, and fast rather than work on conceptual pieces and experiences for the customers to enjoy. Customers are going to economy retails for their basic needs, saving up for expensive luxury items or simply shopping online leaving the high street empty.
  13. 13. Economy Brands
  14. 14. Economy Brands During the recession in 2008 the economy market according to Just-style was worth 50bn Euros across Europe while the rest of the pan-Europe fashion market suffered a decline of 5.2%. The value market can at most times be late to big trends and hit them at their peak which consequently makes them undesirable. With a low budget trends tend to look cheap therefore they sell best through their volume pieces including the like of vests, tops, leggings and jumpers; essential items that the mass audience are most commonly purchasing. "All economical fashion is FAST fashion, but not all FAST fashion is economical" Key Players: Pull & Bear, Bershka, Next, F+F, George, Primark, Peacocks, New Look and Forever 21. Spanish brand Mango, worried by the rise of value retailers introduced a new low-cost line in August 2009 called Think Up in the bid to stay competitive. Entry Price: Prices can start from as little as 50p for an accessory or £2 for a piece of clothing. Usually the end hits the barrier at around £40. Target Market : • Everyone • Economy brands usually fulfil peoples basic needs, customers go in knowing what they want and usually leave with a couple more items due to the cheap prices. Taking an example of a black top, economy brands can simply alter the shape slightly to keep up with the trends. • Due to its fast turn over in clothing Economy brand can change stock to keep up within 2 weeks.

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