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Communications for a changing world July 2015

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Communications for a changing world July 2015

  1. 1. Abu Dhabi Beijing Berlin Brussels Dallas Dubai Frankfurt Hong Kong Johannesburg London Milan Mumbai Munich New York Paris Rome San Francisco Sao Paulo Shanghai Singapore Stockholm Vienna Washington, D.C. Communications for a changing world July 2015
  2. 2. © BRUNSWICK | 2015 | 1 The World Turned Upside Down
  3. 3. © BRUNSWICK | 2015 | 2 A new environment
  4. 4. © BRUNSWICK | 2015 | 3 A profound loss of trust
  5. 5. © BRUNSWICK | 2015 | 4 Whose side are you on?
  6. 6. © BRUNSWICK | 2015 | 5 Are you with the 1%?
  7. 7. © BRUNSWICK | 2015 | 6 ...or the 99%
  8. 8. © BRUNSWICK | 2015 | 7 The new normal
  9. 9. © BRUNSWICK | 2015 | 8 90% 2.1 billion 57% 39% of the world’s data has been created in the last two years active social media accounts of consumer traffic by 2015 of B2B buyers identified that they share info graphics on social media frequently
  10. 10. © BRUNSWICK | 2015 | 9 44% of global internet users spend over one hour per day on social platforms (Source: Global WebIndex, January 2014)
  11. 11. © BRUNSWICK | 2015 | 10
  12. 12. © BRUNSWICK | 2015 | 11 3.38m 1.8m 2005 2015
  13. 13. © BRUNSWICK | 2015 | 12 The “new normal”Shareofdevicetrafficonatypicalworkday Late night (12am-7am) Early morning (7am-10am) Daytime (10am-5pm) Early evening (5pm-8pm) Prime (8pm-12am) Mobiles brighten the commute PCs dominate working hours Tablets popular at night
  14. 14. © BRUNSWICK | 2015 | 13
  15. 15. © BRUNSWICK | 2015 | 14 “In the US, 22% of readers accessed their news last week via Huffpost compared with 12% via the New York Times.” Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism June 16, 2015
  16. 16. © BRUNSWICK | 2015 | 15 Appealing to the lowest common denominator? “I was a journalist at the Financial Times. Whenever you work at a newspaper, particularly a newspaper with high standards, you're struck by the gap between the story that appears in the paper the next day and what the journalist who wrote that story will tell you about it after deadline. The version they tell over a drink is much more interesting—legally riskier, sometimes more trivial, and sometimes it fits less neatly into the institution's narrative. Usually it's a lot truer. The very fact that a journalist will ask another journalist who has a story in the paper, "So what really happened?"—now, just think about that question. It's a powerful question. It's the essence of all meaningful gossip.” Nick Denton
  17. 17. © BRUNSWICK | 2015 | 16 From the Oxford English Dictionary LISTICLE Syllabification: lis·ti·cle Pronunciation: /ˈlistək(ə)l/ Definition of listicle in English: noun An article on the Internet presented in the form of a numbered or bullet-pointed list: a recent BuzzFeed listicle called “21 Pictures That Will Restore Your Faith in Humanity” has attracted more than 13 million views
  18. 18. © BRUNSWICK | 2015 | 17 Rise of “citizen journalism”
  19. 19. © BRUNSWICK | 2015 | 18 Or are their grounds for hope? “The standard unit of production in traditional journalism is an 800 word article… it turns out what people want online is shorter stuff that is focused and creative and meant for social… and the longer stuff…2-3000 words: these are the things people read.” Kevin Delaney Editor in Chief Quartz
  20. 20. © BRUNSWICK | 2015 | 19 Traditional media must either adapt … Janine Gibson, former editor-in-chief of The Guardian’s website, soon to be UK editor Buzzfeed: “For someone with a print background, you’re accustomed to the fact that if it… gets into the paper you’re going to find an audience…It’s entirely the other way around as a digital journalist. The realization that [the audience is] not going to just come and read it has been transformative.”
  21. 21. © BRUNSWICK | 2015 | 20 News outlet brands are migrating to web
  22. 22. © BRUNSWICK | 2015 | 21 Newspaper ad revenue is less than half of what it was a decade ago… …and despite the erection of pay walls by some publications, barely 10% of consumers are currently paying for their news BUT…. 2005 2015
  23. 23. © BRUNSWICK | 2015 | 22 For some it is already too late…
  24. 24. © BRUNSWICK | 2015 | 23 According to the US Department of Labor, over the next ten years the number of journalists is set to decline by 13% against an overall average growth in most professions of 11%
  25. 25. © BRUNSWICK | 2015 | 24 The challenge for communicators
  26. 26. © BRUNSWICK | 2015 | 25 What comms directors most worry about 50% 12% 10% 7% 7% 6% 5% 4% Rise of social, digital and mobile communications Increased pace of communications Integration of communications Doing more with fewer resources More strategic use of communications to manage reputation Engaging with a broader range of stakeholders Greater complexity of work (e.g. managing multiple channels) Measuring & demonstrating comms' business impact & value Q. What do you think is the biggest change in the past couple of years in how your communications department does its job?
  27. 27. © BRUNSWICK | 2015 | 26 Digital and social media “noise” only compounds the problem % who say they are concerned about each 45% 47% 48% 60% Changing stakeholder landscape – size and… Increased government regulation With social media, how to separate what matters… Information overload in general Q. Thinking about your department and the work you do, how relaxed or concerned are you about each of the following? “[I am concerned about the] communication of complex ideas in a world that seems to want 140 character all-in solutions.” (Industry association, Switzerland)
  28. 28. © BRUNSWICK | 2015 | 27 Communications continue to shift to digital Q. How important are each of the following communications channels for your organization now / and how important do you expect them to be in five years’ time?
  29. 29. © BRUNSWICK | 2015 | 28 The new corporate communications world
  30. 30. © BRUNSWICK | 2015 | 29
  31. 31. © BRUNSWICK | 2015 | 30 New tools to measure reputation
  32. 32. © BRUNSWICK | 2015 | 31 Data can inform PR decisions
  33. 33. © BRUNSWICK | 2015 | 32 “With the saturation of channels, the ability to stand out is our biggest challenge. Graphics can look slick for anyone, so it's important for reputation, experience and personality to stand out.” (Listed company, UK)
  34. 34. © BRUNSWICK | 2015 | 33 Four things we know Average time spent on sites = 125 seconds Video on home pages increases engagement by 86% Posts with visuals = 94% more page visits Infographic s grow traffic by 12%
  35. 35. © BRUNSWICK | 2015 | 34 Time it takes from our brains to process visual cues: ¼ second Visuals are processed 60,000 x faster in the brain than text
  36. 36. © BRUNSWICK | 2015 | 35 Nokia / Alcatel-Lucent Deal site 6k 13k 3.5k 6k Number of downloads Video Infographics Press release Presentation
  37. 37. © BRUNSWICK | 2015 | 36 Let pictures tell the story
  38. 38. © BRUNSWICK | 2015 | 37 Telling your own story your way
  39. 39. © BRUNSWICK | 2015 | 38 “Our distribution channels range from email – 17,000 subscribers get an email from us every day – to Twitter to Gizmodo. Our strategy is to write stories that are so compelling that people want to share and comment on social media, and media outlets want to run with them because they know they will interest their readership. As far as our strategy for fueling that social pickup, we do spend a lot of time constructing enticing gateways to the story – the headline, the opening paragraph, an infographic or the GIF – a short animated film. We’ll take a 10-minute video that someone shot for GE years ago and find a five-second segment that’s really GIF-able and put that out on our channels with a link to the full text.” Tomas Kellner
  40. 40. © BRUNSWICK | 2015 | 39
  41. 41. © BRUNSWICK | 2015 | 40 “I think the debate about that has disappeared a bit. When we first launched BlueNotes, a number of people from the traditional media had very strong views about it, but now there is a recognition that there will be many forms of journalism. There is an appetite online for a smorgasbord of content – people aren’t subscribing and dedicating themselves to only one outlet. Even if they tried, they would still be inundated with links on their social networks and in their inboxes. The online user has become source agnostic.” Paul Edwards Head of Communications, ANZ
  42. 42. © BRUNSWICK | 2015 | 41
  43. 43. © BRUNSWICK | 2015 | 42 The elites – or managers in companies – no longer control the conversation. This isn’t just about Arab spring. This is about corporate spring. Marc Benioff, CEO of Salesforce.com
  44. 44. © BRUNSWICK | 2015 | 43
  45. 45. © BRUNSWICK | 2015 | 44 What does it all mean for us?

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