Museums Long Now 160608 Ac

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Presentation for 2008 City University event on the future of the museum. Includes 5 scenarios

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Museums Long Now 160608 Ac

  1. 1. The futures of the museumMuseum of the Long NowJune 02008Andrew CurryDirector, Henley Centre HeadlightVision 1
  2. 2. •Why futures work •The drivers of change •Some emerging scenarios •More detail on the trends© HCHLV 2007 2
  3. 3. Why do we do futures work The pragmatic reason Because we want to have agile and responsive organisations which can manage in uncertain environments and are able to identify opportunities and risks early. The theoretical reason “We are all open systems theorists now” 3© HCHLV 2007 3
  4. 4. Organisations as open systems Wider social environment (a field of value shifts as people change their world) Task environment (e.g. competitors, regulatory agencies, changing user base, technology changes System (e.g corporation, community, trade “For a system to be viable over time, it association, or needs to: network of •constantly scan relevant environments stakeholders) for changes that might affect its viability •actively adapt to new information it receives in such a way that it also influences those environments” (Merrelyn Emery and Tom Devane)© HCHLV 2007 Merrelyn Emeryand Tom Davane, “Search conference”, in Holman and Devane (eds) The Change Handbook 4
  5. 5. The futures cycle Scanning Implementing Understanding Interpreting© HCHLV 2007 Source: Henley Centre HeadlightVision 5
  6. 6. The traditional view: command and control External environment Resources Talent Audiences© HCHLV 2007 Adapted from Martin Dale, Europa, Europa 6
  7. 7. The organisation is in the heart of its environment External environment Resources Audiences Talent© HCHLV 2007 Adapted from Martin Dale, Europa, Europa 7
  8. 8. The drivers of change© HCHLV 2007 8
  9. 9. Using the framework to describe the trends External environment Resources Audiences Talent© HCHLV 2007 Adapted from Martin Dale, Europa, Europa 9
  10. 10. Using the framework to describe the trends External environment Squeezed resources (falling disposable income) Increased push for sustainability Desire for well-being Increasingly ubiquitous technologies Increasing mobility and cultural diversity© HCHLV 2007 10
  11. 11. Using the framework to describe the trends Rise of mix and remix (users as producers) Ageing population - but ageless Desire for self- improvement Fragmentation of leisure Audiences Experiential economy (and shared experience Increasing inequalities© HCHLV 2007 11
  12. 12. Using the framework to analyse the trends Renegotiation of work - the fluid workplace Resources Digital and distributed organisations Corporatisation and marketisation of the arts Growth of philanthropy Museums as “knowledge assets” (and “the creative economy”) Increasingly contested knowledge© HCHLV 2007 12
  13. 13. Using the framework to analyse the trends Urbanisation of culture (the rise of the city-regions) Changing approaches to innovation Talent Changing gender and ethnic mix of the workforce The artist as catalyst© HCHLV 2007 13
  14. 14. And by way of a reminder (see Annex for details) External environment Audience Resources TalentSqueezed resources (falling Rise of mix and remix (users Resources work - the Renegotiation of Urbanisation of culture (thedisposable income) as producers) fluid workplace rise of the city-regions)Increased push for Ageing population - but Digital and distributed The management of talentsustainability ageless organisationsDesire for well-being Desire for self-improvement Corporatisation and Changing gender and ethnic marketisation of the arts mix of the workforceIncreasingly ubiquitous Fragmentation of leisure Growth of philanthropy The artist as catalysttechnologiesIncreasing mobility and cultural Experiential economy (and Museums as “knowledgediversity Audiences shared experience) assets” (and “the creative Talent economy”) Increasing inequalities Increasingly contested knowledge © HCHLV 2007 14
  15. 15. Some implications from the trends analysis • Increasingly mobile workforce • Gravitation towards cities seen as tolerant and outward looking, and having good public spaces and culture • The focus on the rehabilitation of urban centres as ‘marketable’ popular cultural venues • ‘Safe’ cultural choices and the predominance of corporate ownership can lead to the homogenising of cultural experiences • Cultural innovation often occurs in temporary, marginal areas Source: Henley Centre; Richard Florida, the Rise of the Creative Class; Chatterton & Hollands, Urban© HCHLV 2008 Nightscapes: Youth Pleasures, Pleasure Spaces and Corporate Power (2003); Archis 2003; Hakim Bey 15
  16. 16. Five scenarios
  17. 17. Keeping the future in mind when managing Scanning Implementing Understanding Interpreting© HCHLV 2007 Source: Henley Centre HeadlightVision 17
  18. 18. Listening to the organisation – and the environment External environment Resources “Creative Users/ producer” Customers Talent© HCHLV 2007 Adapted from Martin Dale, Europa, Europa 18
  19. 19. The forum - local meeting #1: The forum-and resource space,discovery, shared (social/free) experiences, relaerningof skills, disputed localmeanings. Likely to have avirtual component which linksthose who identify with thearea or are interested in it. © HenleyCentreHeadlightVision
  20. 20. • The rich club . The corporate museum, the #2: The rich club museum which is aligned with high culture high profile collections and exhibitions. In a world where it seems likely that knowledge will be more contested, this upholds traditional notions of the canon. (Several of the new Gulf museums might be in this space) © HenleyCentreHeadlightVision
  21. 21. • Splinter groups -are museums created #3: Splinter groups through tightly engaged communities of interest, could be purely virtual but may have a physical home for artefacts . In a world where travel is likely to be more difficult, diaspora museums would be a special case. Krakow’s Galicia museum might be an example. © HenleyCentreHeadlightVision
  22. 22. Aka the remix museum. Ittakes the notion of the #4: The cut-upextended workplace (inspace and time) to itslogical conclusion, andextends it to remixedmeanings, activereinterpretations, andopen knowledge. Likely tobe primarily virtual, butlikely to extend itself intomedia and culturalartefacts such as booksand lectures. © HenleyCentreHeadlightVision
  23. 23. • The challenges of sustainability and #5: Imaginarium resource shortages, and the pursuit of social well- being, require new discourses and worldviews. The imaginarium is the home of social and interpretative innovation - drawing on diverse workforce and users, bringing history into the present as a source both of meaning and skills. © HenleyCentreHeadlightVision
  24. 24. Instead of a conclusion
  25. 25. “The purpose of looking at the future is to disturb the present” (Gaston Berger)© HCHLV 2007 25
  26. 26. “There are places, there are things, that once you’ve heard them, move into your future and wait for you to arrive. It may take years, but sooner or later the meeting will happen”. Russell Hoban© HenleyCentreHeadlightVision
  27. 27. Annex: the trends in moredetail
  28. 28. Using the framework to describe the trends External environment Resources Audiences Talent© HCHLV 2007 Adapted from Martin Dale, Europa, Europa 28
  29. 29. Using the framework to describe the trends External environment Audience Resources TalentSqueezed resources (falling Rise of mix and remix (users Resources work - the Renegotiation of Urbanisation of culture (thedisposable income) as producers) fluid workplace rise of the city-regions)Increased push for Ageing population - but Digital and distributed Changing approaches tosustainability ageless organisations innovationDesire for well-being Desire for self-improvement Corporatisation and Changing gender and ethnic marketisation of the arts mix of the workforceIncreasingly ubiquitous Fragmentation of leisure Growth of philanthropy The artist as catalysttechnologiesIncreasing mobility and cultural Experiential economy (and Museums as “knowledgediversity Audiences shared experience) assets” (and “the creative Talent economy”) Increasing inequalities Increasingly contested knowledge © HCHLV 2007 29
  30. 30. Using the framework to describe the trends External environment Squeezed resources (falling disposable income) Increased push for sustainability Desire for well-being Increasingly ubiquitous technologies Increasing mobility and cultural diversity© HCHLV 2007 30
  31. 31. People believe that the government must tackle climate change, and a series of sustainability-based regulation is following ‘Who is most responsible for tackling climate change?’1 Individuals 8% 12% The UK Government is Industries/companies committed to protecting Government 14% Non Government/ the environment and to Non-Profit tackling climate change, organisations/ Local community 66% both at home and abroad. groups A Bill will be brought forward to make the United The Sustainable Communities Act Kingdom the first country in will work by giving increasing the world to introduce a devolved powers that local legally binding framework council representatives have to to reduce carbon dioxide empower them to solve the emissions problems within their local DEFRA Press Office, 2007 communities. One of the measurements of sustainability is environmental protection2© HCHLV 2008 Source: 1: PCC 2007, 2: www.parliament.uk 31
  32. 32. The search for authenticity • The unusual is becoming more and more commonplace • The concept of the ‘authentic’ • What is authenticity? − Defined origin? Handmade? − Traditional? Unique? • Farmers makers are one manifestation of consumers showing their support for individual and authentic products. • Mass-produced and easily replicable products and services are under pressure to engage with consumers© HCHLV 2008 32 Source: organicfood.co.uk
  33. 33. Wellbeing: the physical health angle• There has been a dramatic ‘Changes made in relation to the increase in the number of amount of exercise you do:’ overweight and obese people in Have successfully changed: the UK: % Have tried but failed − Currently one out of five adults 35 33 32 diagnosed as clinically obese 31 31 30 29• People are increasingly 27 25 25 27 26 26 25 concerned about their physical 25 21 health and fitness: 20 20 19 19 17 − In 2004,1 in 3 people 16 successfully changed the 15 amount of exercise that they 10 do and 1 in 5 tried but failed − Membership of both private 5 and public gyms has grown by 0 a quarter since 2002, climbing total 25-34 45-54 65+ Women 15-24 35-44 55-64 Men 8 per cent during last year alone to more than 7m people Physical activity plan Source: Henley Centre, PCC 2004, Financial Times, July 19, 2005 ,www.bbc.co.uk © HenleyCentreHeadlightVision
  34. 34. The softer side of wellbeing• People crave wellbeing in a time and energy deficit culture: − 52% of people agreed ‘I am so tired in the evenings I often dont have the energy to do much’ compared with 46% in 2001• People are increasingly retuning to nature as relief from the complexity and clamour of life: − There is a growing interest in seasonal food and the number of UK members of the Slow Food movement grew by over 900% between 1999 and 2004• There is a discernable ‘search for meaning’ in people’s lives• People’s increasingly see leisure time as a route to gain wellbeing and find sense in their lives Source: BISG Press Releases, May 2005, SlowFood, 2004 statistics © HenleyCentreHeadlightVision
  35. 35. There is growing household connectedness but also a continuing digital divide • In 2007, nearly 15 million UK residential internet connections1 households in Great Britain (61%) had Internet access1 • 84% of UK households with Internet access had a broadband connection in 2007, up from 69% in 2006, and 85% of households have digital TV1 • However, experiences of the new media world are often unequal, and digital exclusion remains a challenge − Ofcom has found that just 28% of people over 65 have internet access1 − Social group AB is more open to using the widest range of communication methods; social group DE are much less likely to want to communicate 4 in 5 people are concerned about2 how the via the internet and email personal information about them that is held on company databases is stored and used Source: 1: Ofcom 2007; 2: IIPS 2008© HCHLV 2008 35
  36. 36. The ‘always on’ society % agree with statement:• Mobile phones, the blackberry ‘I like to be contactable on my mobile and increasingly empowered all the time’ consumers are driving our 24/7 % ‘always on’ culture 80• Similar expectations around 70 access to companies and 70 experiences 60• This raises questions about social interaction 50 − How will we choose to 40 37 interact in the future?• Starting to see a backlash 30 against ‘always on’ 20 − Consumers against mobile phones on flights 10 − Can/should arts venues 0 provide sanctuary? Age 15-19 Average adult© HCHLV 2008 Source: OfCom 2006, PCC 2003 36
  37. 37. Using the framework to describe the trends Rise of mix and remix (users as producers) Ageing population - but ageless Desire for self- improvement Fragmentation of leisure Audiences Experiential economy (and shared experience Increasing inequalities© HCHLV 2007 37
  38. 38. Consumers are increasingly creating and sharing their own content, particularly online We are starting to witness the arrival of a new generation of bedroom auteurs: movie directors, composers, scribblers and artists of all kinds Technological applications are enabling consumers to create and filter content that is relevant to them and block out that which is not© HCHLV 2008 38
  39. 39. DIY media and personalisation • Consumers now expect to be able to personalise their media consumption − A general shift from ‘push’ media to ‘pull’ media • There has been a huge growth in the user generated content (UGC) online, facilitated by increasingly widespread access to broadband • UGC sites such as You Tube and Facebook have grown in popularity at a rapid rate • For traditional forms of media such as TV, there has been a growth in self- scheduling of content • It can be harder to reach people, and they want to engage increasingly on their own terms Source: Forrester 2006© HCHLV 2008 39
  40. 40. The British population is ageing, but at the same time age is no longer a key determinant of lifestyle 35 % of UK population over 65 years of age The UK over 50s population spend around £240bn every year on leisure and account for over 40% of all 25 consumer spending3 15 5 1950 1970 1990 2010 2030 2050 55% of UK respondents, and 57% of those over 65, agree that is important to them to maintain a ‘youthful lifestyle’2 Source: Euromonitor 2008, 2: PCC 2007, 3:© HCHLV 2008 The Times, September 2006 40
  41. 41. ‘Younger’ longer • Traditional stereotypes of ‘old’ are changing • With improving levels of general health and increasing social diversity, many will act in ways that defy that physical age • Celebrity culture has led to the mainstreaming of cosmetic “Baby boomers have traded their right surgery to greater wisdom, finesse, and • Older consumers are bigger accumulated experiences for the right spenders than they used to be: to stay young. − SKIers (Spending the And the youngsters have traded their Kids’ Inheritance) are youth culture for the right to be taken emerging seriously. We used to have a generation gap, now we have a generation deal.” Lada Gorlenko, Design & Usability Consultant, IBM© HCHLV 2008 41
  42. 42. The cult of self improvement • Replacing the ‘bluffers’ guide’ mentality with a sense that improving your own self- worth is a valuable way to spend your time • Accessible to everyone − Life coaches − Evening classes − Learning holidays − Growing interest in books and book clubs • Can the arts sector do more to capitalise on this trend?© HCHLV 2008 42
  43. 43. The experience economy The proportion of income spent on leisure - • People are increasingly including theatre, cinema, holidays, sport and choosing to spend more on education fees - has doubled since 1982 from 7% to 14% in the year to March 2005 ¹ ‘experiences’ rather than material goods • The pleasure of consumption is becoming paramount • Does culture count as retail or leisure? – or both? − Witness the growth of the museum shop • ‘Bite-size’ arts and culture, or elaborate experiences? “Consumers are often fully aware that they • How might an economic are more interested in consuming aura than objects, sizzle than steak, meaning than downturn impact the material.” 4 experience economy?© HCHLV 2008 Sources: ‘Britons spending more on leisure, less on food’ The Guardia November 2005,, ‘A report on the 1999-2000 family expenditure survey’ ONS, 43 PCC data 2004, HCHLV executive interview
  44. 44. Fragmentation of leisure• Rising number of Britons taking regional holidays: No. UK residents visiting UK tourist − The number of Leisure trips board regions taken by UK citizens to the regional tourist boards 1991 2001 increased from 154 million in Northumbria 3 4 1996 to 167 million trips in 2002 Cumbria 3 5• Expansion of the tourism industry North West 8 14 leads to greater diversification of Yorkshire 7 11 leisure: 6 East of England 13 − People want a holiday suited Heart of England 14 22 to them as individuals 7 London 17 “Demand is Southern 11 13 6 growing in the South Eas England 13 13 South West England tailor-made travel 0 5 10 15 20 20 25 market” millions Holiday company Thomson, 6th October 2004 Source: ONS, Regional Trends 38© HenleyCentreHeadlightVision
  45. 45. Fragmentation of leisure Rise in niche activities - Power gliding - Jet-skiing - Advanced mountain biking activities Tides of ‘fad interests’ - Such as ‘all terrain boarding’© HenleyCentreHeadlightVision
  46. 46. Widening income inequalities The proportion of people not on Overall earnings inequalities are widening housing benefit but cannot afford to buy anything above the cheapest 10% of houses1 The overall distribution of income has changed little over the last decade.  The poorest tenth have less than 2% of total income 2 The proportion of children in low income households has fallen from 34% in 1998/99 to 30% in 2005/06. Children remain more likely than adults to live in low income households Around two-fifths of people from ethnic minorities live in low income households, twice the rate for white people 2 Source: 1: Joseph Rowntree Foundation, 2005, 2: www.poverty.org.uk© HCHLV 2008 46
  47. 47. Growing income disparity• The growing disparity The wealthiest 1% of the UK between the richest and population hold 23% of the poorest in society nation’s wealth• Dramatic divisions of access and inequity across UK society % share of total income by Top 10% household Bottom 10%• Increasingly strong public awareness of the 1979 4.4 20 infringement of rights and means of reparation 1990 3.2 25• Attracting consumers from ethnic minority backgrounds 1996 3.5 24 and disabled people is a key aim 2010 3.0 30 10 5 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 %© HCHLV 2008 47 Source: ONS, Households Below Average Income;
  48. 48. Entitlement: the return of the public• Just as economic shares become % share of total income by more unequal, there is household compensation in the public Top 10% Bottom 10% realm 1979 4.4 20• Human Rights Act (and Freedom of Information) are about forms 1990 3.2 25 of legal and government access• Rights of physical access to land 1996 3.5 24 and buildings are increasingly embedded in law 2010 3.0 30• The language of ‘cultural % entitlement’ is common in the 10 5 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 arts“Culture alone can give people the means better to understand andengage with life… which can help us slay the sixth giant of moderntimes – poverty of aspiration.” Tessa Jowell MP Source: ONS “Households Below Average Income” 2000/01, Report of the 2002-3 Britain Day Visits Survey, TGI BMRB 2004© HenleyCentreHeadlightVision
  49. 49. Using the framework to analyse the trends Renegotiation of work - the fluid workplace Resources Digital and distributed organisations Corporatisation and marketisation of the arts Growth of philanthropy Museums as “knowledge assets” (and “the creative economy”) Increasingly contested knowledge© HCHLV 2007 49
  50. 50. Increasingly fluid work structures • Moving from rigid to fluid organisational structures - new ways of using resources • Hot-desking and sharing other resources • Temporary collectives to fulfill specific pieces of work, with temporary use of resources • The rise of dynamic, short- term employment on a project basis in the creative industries© HCHLV 2008 50
  51. 51. Competitive cultural funding landscape Business cash sponsorship experienced• Declining business investment in no growth in real terms in 2005/06. All the arts and cultural sector is a other components of business investment major concern experienced a significant decrease• The sector is facing an Arts & Business Private Investment Benchmarking increasingly competitive funding Survey 2005/06 landscape• Cultural organisations in the UK rely heavily on one source of funding to support their operations (in most cases, public funding). − Has worked well in the past for many cultural organisations “…why have − Makes them vulnerable to business investment figures fallen in real “Most arts organisations are the social shifts or evolution in terms? Is this a minor blip, or part of a used to delivering rather more funding landscape downward drift? I sense a blip…” than they are paid for.” A&B Chief Executive, Colin Tweedy John Tusa© HCHLV 2008 Source: Arts & Business, HCHLV 51
  52. 52. Networks and digital organisations Supplier Supplier Supplier • ICT and the rise of networks can enable organisations to move Purchasing away from in-house expertise − But this doesn’t mean they always should Finance • Careful consideration of what is HR core to the brand and its values before decisions are made Brand Manufacture − Relevant for individual arts Marketing organisations, museums − Moving from a linear Sales/Service structure to a series of inter- relationships between you, your suppliers, your customers CustomersSource: BT © HCHLV 2008 52
  53. 53. Growth of philanthropy • Traditional private investment “There is much to be said for sources in the charity sector are seeing artists as servants of the rapidly changing innovation process” • Growing emphasis on partnerships, the role of venture John Thackara philanthropists and clear return on investment (RoI) • Individual giving has become a “High-income parents are enrolling their substantial source of fundraising children in philanthropy workshops designed income to teach them how to use their wealth to do − has the potential to become good. A new generation of philanthropists the single most important are being encouraged to … consider which source of funding in the future charities might benefit from their “There is a continuing unease about raising money...demand is spiralling, with growing funds from the private sector. But if it is numbers of wealthy individuals matched by faced head-on, with confidence and an increasingly professional approach to honesty, the relationship between the giver philanthropy in Britain.” and the asker can be strong, positive, The Guardian, Dec 2007 supportive and enjoyable.” John Tusa © HCHLV 2008Source: www.mobilebristol.co.uk/flash.html Source: Arts & Business Private Investment Benchmarking Survey 2005/06, The Guardian 53
  54. 54. Using the framework to analyse the trends Urbanisation of culture (the rise of the city-regions) Changing approaches to innovation Talent Changing gender and ethnic mix of the workforce The artist as catalyst© HCHLV 2007 54
  55. 55. Urbanisation of culture• Competition: − Liverpool won the competition to be European Capital of Culture 2008. − It is estimated that the Culture title could net Liverpool an extra 1.7 million visitors to the city.• Cultural developments and a revived interest in architecture: − The Baltic Flour Mills and the Sage, Newcastle Gateshead − Millenuium Stadium, Cardiff − Imperial War Museum North and Urbis, Manchester − The Lowry Centre, Salford• Increasing interest in the ‘city region’ as a driver of regional success − Urban quality of life regarded as economic driver Source: ERM Economics 2004, www.bbc.co.uk © HenleyCentreHeadlightVision
  56. 56. People crave a distinctive identity for their urban environment• A backlash against ‘clone towns’: − Four out of 10 of the nations high streets are "clone towns", according to research conducted by the New Economics Foundation. − In June 2005 Exeter was shamed as the greatest clone high street in the country “Just as farmers’ markets and specialist retailers are popping up all over the place…there is still room for switched-on, independent booksellers.” Source: The Bookseller, Novmber 2004, http://www.thebookcase.co.uk, Guardian, July 2000, www.countrybookshop.co.uk© HenleyCentreHeadlightVision
  57. 57. The management of talent • The importance of horizontal, non-hierarchical structures and fluid organisational processes • Organisational innovation needs clear principles • The ‘holarchic’ organisation - each fragment of the organisation reflecting the “You can’t socially re- whole engineer these systems without understanding them intimately. You need to know what it’s like to struggle with the pressures at the grass roots”. Prof Henry Mintzberg© HCHLV 2008 57
  58. 58. The ‘corporatisation’ of the arts “There’s no excuse for amateurism any • Increasing professionalism of more, no room for those who shy at the the arts thought that the arts might, indeed, be a business.” • Changing expectations from funders John Tusa • Wider social trends such as the importance attached to formal qualifications Managers • Emphasis on management + + skills at the expense of professional expertise − A trend seen in both the public Targets Budgets sector and the private sector − A ‘site of struggle’ which creates permanent organisational tensions _ _ Professionals© HCHLV 2008 58
  59. 59. Renegotiation of the workplace Change in employment status, 1971-2005 • Change from fixed Full time Part time Self employed contracts to more 000s negotiated relationships 5 4173 • Large rise in part-time and 4 temporary workers 2792 • Employees demand 3 greater flexibility and work/ 2 1381 1405 life balance 776 1046 629 1 • Office structures are moving towards ‘club’ 0 environments -1 − Space for meeting, thinking -2 -1415 etc − Leisure facilities, shops, dry- -3 -2461 cleaning, crèche facilities Male Female Total© HCHLV 2008 Source: ONS; Henley Centre, PCC 2001; DTI projections 59
  60. 60. Changing gender balance of the workplace % of UK workforce • More women are working than ever before Male Female 60 57 − Although the number of women working in “cultural industries” has 55 51 50 50 49 increased in recent years, they still 50 make up only 36% of the cultural 45 43 industries’ workforce. 40 • The gender pay gap has been 35 decreasing steadily since the 30 1975 Equal Pay Act, but there is 25 still a significant difference 20 between men and women’s 1982 1992 2002 salaries − The full-time pay gap has closed considerably from 29.5% in 1975, to 17.2% in 2006© HCHLV 2008 Source: EEDA “Equality in focus”; GEM Report UK 2002; Nomis, The Gender Pay Gap report 2001 (Women and Equality Unit), The Independent Theatre Council Report 2001, Facts about Men and Women in Great Britain – A report by the Equailty Commission 2006 60
  61. 61. Increasingly diverse workforce?• There has been an increase in the Over 600,000 people have number of migrant workers, come to work in the UK from particularly from EU countries post the eight nations which joined ascension the European Union in 2004• 4% of the arts workforce is from a minority ethnic group. This broadly “There is little diversity among reflects the proportion of the national entrants to the museum workforce. workforce from an ethnic minority Museums want more people from group (5%) minority-ethnic backgrounds, more − Certain cultural groups are under- people from poorer backgrounds, represented in the arts. Indians more disabled people – and more make up 21% of the total ethnic men…There is work to do to minority workforce but only 19% of promote museum careers to a wider those working in the arts range of potential entrants, but this − Black and ethnic minorities have needs to be supported by accessible very little decision-making input entry routes.” into performance companies. The Tomorrow People: Entry to the museum Only 4% of Artistic Directors and 6% workforce, Maurice Davies, Feb 2007 of Board Members working in the theatre industry are black.© HCHLV 2008 Source: ONS Population and Migration; DIW Institute, BBC News August 2006 , Independent Theatre Council Report 2001 61
  62. 62. The artist as catalyst • Traditional concepts of the artist • The importance of individuals and artistic organisations as creative catalysts • Organisational, facilitative and financial strands of the creative process • The role of creative catalyst in the growing integration of arts initiatives with wider social initiatives© HCHLV 2008 62
  63. 63. The rise of the city region • Increasingly mobile workforce • Gravitation towards cities seen as tolerant and outward looking, and having good public spaces and culture • The focus on the rehabilitation of urban centres as ‘marketable’ popular cultural venues “Historic, residual and • ‘Safe’ cultural choices and the alternative forms of nightlife predominance of corporate are increasingly ownership can lead to the marginalised… over- homogenising of cultural regulated till they experiences disappear… or bought out under the weight of urban • Cultural innovation often occurs renewal and gentrified in temporary, marginal areas leisure” Source: Henley Centre; Richard Florida, the Rise of the Creative Class; Chatterton & Hollands, Urban© HCHLV 2008 Nightscapes: Youth Pleasures, Pleasure Spaces and Corporate Power (2003); Archis 2003; Hakim Bey 63
  64. 64. Increasing diversity of UK society• The ethnic minority and foreign born population in the UK is growing − Between 1991-2001, the ethnic minority population grew by 53% from 3 million to 4.6 million people¹ − In 2001, 4.9 million (8.3 per cent) of the total population of the UK were born overseas. This is more The non-White population: by ethnic group, April 2001, UK than double the 2.1 million (4.2 per cent) in 1951• Although there is regional concentration of BMEs, trended data indicates segregation is not a feature in Britain Source: UK census 2001© HCHLV 2008 64
  65. 65. In summary External environment Audience Resources TalentSqueezed resources (falling Rise of mix and remix (users Resources work - the Renegotiation of Urbanisation of culture (thedisposable income) as producers) fluid workplace rise of the city-regions)Increased push for Ageing population - but Digital and distributed The management of talentsustainability ageless organisationsDesire for well-being Desire for self-improvement Corporatisation and Changing gender and ethnic marketisation of the arts mix of the workforceIncreasingly ubiquitous Fragmentation of leisure Growth of philanthropy The artist as catalysttechnologiesIncreasing mobility and cultural Experiential economy (and Museums as “knowledgediversity Audiences shared experience) assets” (and “the creative Talent economy”) Increasing inequalities Increasingly contested knowledge © HCHLV 2007 65
  66. 66. Creating better futures Andrew.curry@hchlv.com6 More London Place, Tooley Street, London SE1 2QY T +44 (0) 20 7955 1800 F +44 (0) 20 7955 1900 betterfutures@hchlv.com W www.hchlv.com London New York Delhi Mumbai

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