Anno Europeo del Volontariato

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Anno Europeo del Volontariato

  1. 1. Financé par la Commission Européenne International volunteering: ADICE 2 avenue Jean Lebas - 59100 RoubaixTél. +33 3 20 11 22 68 - Fax. +33 3 20 02 10 87 ADICE Rhône-Alpes 70 avenue de la Bruyère - 38100 GrenobleTél. +33 9 81 76 24 32 - Fax. +33 4 76 70 24 32 A concrete impact at the service of social cohesion Conception graphique : adice@adice.asso.fr www.adice.asso.fr
  2. 2. VOLUNTEERING, an experience and a meansof making tomorrow’s Europe Our partnersIt must be remembered that volunteering is not an end in itself. It has no meaning if itdoes not generate human capital and social capital. It traces a path towards integrationand employment and represents a crucial factor for the improving of social cohesion. Inthis sense, volunteering gives concrete form to the fundamental values of justice, solidarity,integration and citizenship on which Europe is based. rough the experience the volunteerscontribute to the shaping of the European society and those who are involved outside theirhome countries actively participate in the construction of a Europe of citizensAs a citizen and solidarity experience, volunteering becomes a concrete and relevant meansof fighting against exclusion by enabling young people to reveal their resources, theirtalents and their commitment. Volunteering is all the more adapted in that it answers Europejskie Forum Cemea del Mezzogiorno Kericon the one hand the high expectation of young people to be able to commit themselves in Młodzieży (Pologne) (Italie) (Slovaquie)society « differently » and transform it in order to find a place and also to imagine places. Plac Wolnosci 5/5 Via fortebraccio 1A Nábrežná 1351 57500 Bystrzyca Klodzka 00176 Rome 02201 Čadca,A LONG STANDING commitment on the part Pologne Italy Slovakia www.efm.org.pl www.mezzogiorno.fr www.en.keric.skof ADICE and its partners Tél. +48 748 110 223 Tél. +390 645 492 629 Tél. 00421 41 433 56 85Since 1999 the Adice (the Association for the Development of Citizen and European Fax. +48 748 111 399 Fax. +390 645 493 375 Fax. 00421 41 433 56 87Initiatives) has been committed to this path. In order to fulfil this ambition, it has developed abroad network of partnerships and an internal management system for large-scale Europeanand international volunteering projects. e aim is to give all the volunteers the means,through mobility, of developing social, professional and intercultural skills by making use ofthe various programmes: European Voluntary Service, Amicus, Grundvig.After 10 years of experience, the European Year of Volunteering 2011 will have been theopportunity for the Adice and six of its partners (Europejskie Forum Młodzieży - Poland ;Cemea del Mezzogiorno - Italy ; Keric - Slovakia ; VE France ; Municipalite de Åmål - Suede andPuerto de Lumbreras - Spain) to give visibility to and emphasise the value of the work donein this field. Municipalité de Åmål Municipalité VE FranceEUREKA, an opportunity to assess and go further (Suède) Puerto de Lumbreras (France)« Understand in order to continue to act» - that is in substance what motivated the Adice and (Espagne) Municipality of Åmål Maison des associationsits partners to submit a survey project in the context of the EUREKA (European Universal Kungsgatan 26 Plaza de la Constitución, 2 du XI° arrondissementReference for Enriching Knowledge & Abilities)2 project. 66 231 Åmål 30890 Puerto Lumbreras 8, rue du Général Renault Sweden (Murcia) Espagne 75011 Paris www.amal.se www.puertolumbreras.es www.ve-france.orgA DUAL AMBITION: assessing the opinions Tél. + 46 532 170 00 Tél. +34 968 40 20 13of the volunteers and the effects of volunteering Fax. + 46 532 188 70 Fax. +34 968 40 24 10Conducted with volunteers from 6 European countries (Poland, Slovakia, France, Italy, Spainand Sweden) between June and September 2011, this survey by questionnaire enabled361 people to report the impact of their voluntary service in terms of social integration,employability and development of skills. Special attention was paid to people with feweropportunities. e results of this survey are detailed in this report. For all that, the authors chose not tocontent themselves with a stereotyped presentation. is document has therefore beendrafted with a triple aim:> Sharing the results of the survey (knowledge)> Emphasising the value of the volunteering activities conducted by the European Union and Copas making them more visible (communication) (France)> Encouraging the national public authorities to develop, at their levels, strategies for enhancing the value of and developing volunteering and its usefulness as a lever for social 54/56, rue Nationale promotion (sensitisation). 59000 Lille http://copas.coop/ Tél. 03 28 04 54 24 Fax. 03 28 04 54 251. 2010 report on citizenship in the Union – Remove the obstacles to the exercising of their rights by the citizens of the Union, COM (2010) 603 final dated 27 October 2010.2. Eureka was one of the two French projects subsidised under the European Year of Volunteering 2011 by the European Commission
  3. 3. Contents1. Introduction: the survey in a few words ............................................................................................... 51.1. A European and Partnership survey .............................................................................................................................. 51.2. A unique cooperation undertaking ............................................................................................................................... 51.3. 361 respondent: replies of quality but a difficult analysis by country ........................................................ 62. Respondents in the image of the volunteers: mainly young ladies of very diverse nationality and country of residence ...................................................................................................... 72.1. An average age of 23 years for the respondents ..................................................................................................... 72.2. 75% girls ......................................................................................................................................................................................... 72.3. 23 different nationalities ...................................................................................................................................................... 72.4. 29 different countries of residence ................................................................................................................................. 73. e volunteering candidates: diverse profiles (age, education, etc.) for a program that adapts ............................................................................................................................. 83.1. e 20-26 age group, the majority of the candidates … but a program that remains accessible to other age groups ............................................................................ 83.2. Volunteering, a means of consolidating the training paths .............................................................................. 93.3. Two years after: the average scholastic level improves .....................................................................................103.4. An alternative when in a precarious situation .......................................................................................................113.5. A program used more by young people from an urban environment ....................................................123.6. A possible way of being independent of their parents .....................................................................................123.7. Strengthening their experience of travel and commitment ...........................................................................124. Preparing for voluntary service: the highly positive role of the sending structures 144.1. e "grapevine" and the "Internet", the main vehicles for informing and motivating the volunteers .......................................................................................................................................144.2. Young people motivated by the discovery of other cultures and sensitive to the idea of social commitment ................................................................................................................................144.3. Volunteers given support and satisfied with their preparation ...................................................................154.4. A useful preparation to specify and formalise the objectives of the voluntary service ..................154.5. Multiple and precise objectives which remain consistent with the original motives ......................155. Actions and projects of the volunteers: a fruitful experience for everyone, results attained on the whole ....................................................................................................................................185.1. 80% of the projects are "long-term" (between 2 and 12 months) ..............................................................185.2. e short-term voluntary service (20% of the projects lasting less than 2 months): an initial experience of mobility adapted to the publics with fewer opportunities .........................185.3. "Children and Youth": preferential area for hosting the volunteers ...........................................................205.4. For all, a rare opportunity to develop diverse skills through the carrying out of concrete actions .......................................................................................................................................................205.5. Voluntary service, a real contribution to autonomy and opening up ......................................................206. Zoom on the skills acquired .......................................................................................................................236.1. An opportunity to acquire or develop skills: social, linguistic and organisational .............................236.2. e acquisition of technical skills: a lesser impact ...............................................................................................246.3. For 77% of the volunteers, the objectives of their service were attained ...............................................246.4. An improvement expected in the validation of the skills ...............................................................................257. e return of the volunteers: support to be strengthened in order to enhance the value of the experience ...............................................................................................267.1. Volunteers less followed up on their return ............................................................................................................267.2. Volunteers less satisfied with the support provided on their return ........................................................277.3. Difficulties on their return for 57% of the people questioned, in particular for the young people in a precarious situation.......................................................................................................277.4. 44% of the people questioned changed the course of their careers on their return .........................277.5. A program that energises the career project and enables access to employment of one person questioned in 5 ........................................................................................................................................288. Satisfied volunteers … who commit themselves in their turn in order to emphasise the value of this program ..............................................................................................298.1. A very high overall level of satisfaction: 96% ..........................................................................................................298.2. Volunteers who in their turn commit themselves in order to promote this program ....................309. Verbatim, the words used by the volunteers to describe their experience .....................319.1. How their voluntary service experience benefitted them personally .......................................................319.2. What they are most proud of… .....................................................................................................................................32 3
  4. 4. Intro1. Introduction : the survey in a few words1.1. A European and Partnership survey> A survey financed by the European Union in the context of the European Year of 1.3. 361 respondents: replies of quality but a difficult analysis by country > All the questionnaire respondents are volunteers who were sent or received by the 6 partner structures. > Some of the partners made available IT tools on their premises for the volunteers who needed them. > VE France, for its part, sent this online questionnaire to all its members. 361 questionnaires were filled in and processed. > e sample initially sought (250 volunteers) was exceeded. Volunteering (EUREKA) > Virtually all the volunteers answered all the questions.> Owned by the ADICE and set in place with 6 partners > On the other hand, the number of respondents was very different from one country to another. • Europejskie Forum > With two partners for France (including a network of former volunteers), 62% of Młodzieży ese 3 associative partners have identical experience the questionnaires were filled in in French. 17% in Polish and 20% of the remaining (Poland) to the ADICE in the field of volunteering. ey questionnaires were in Spanish, Italian, Slovak and English. • Cemea del Mezzogiorno help various publics to set up their international (Italy) volunteering projects, via the EVS in particular. • Keric (Slovakia) e sample sought THE SURVEY CONDUCTED • Municipalite de Åmål 125 Respondents Frequency ese two towns are highly committed to European (Sweden) volunteering. Amal regularly receives European 25 France 62% • Puerto de Lumbreras 63 volunteers. 25 Poland 17% (Spain) 25 Spain 25 7% A national network, this structure brings together 25 Slovakia 18 5% local associations that conduct various initiatives 25 Sweden 16 4% designed to develop and improve the quality and the 25 Italy 16 4% recognition of the European Voluntary Service (EVS). VE France 250 Total 361 100% VE France contributes moreover to developing the commitment to volunteering of young people through extensive cooperation with the Agence Nationale Française. > Consequently, the results presented in this report are overall results as an analysis on a country basis did not have in fact any meaning and was likely to produce> Volunteers questioned via these structures in each country: France, Poland, Sweden, Spain, weird comparisons or interpretations. Italy and Slovakia.1.2. A unique cooperation undertakingIn order to endow themselves with a rigorous methodological framework, the Adice and itspartners called upon the services of an outside firm, COPAS (consultant in social practicesand analyses)3.A firm specialising in social policies in the widest sense (education, youth, social cohesion,etc.), Copas has thus helped the partners with the various stages of this survey: leadingthe work meetings for the designing of the questionnaire, development of the «onlinequestionnaire» techniques, processing of the replies, support for the analysing of the resultsand the drafting of the survey report, etc.In other words this survey was the opportunity to bring together a diverse range of playersand get them working together in a concrete form: association partners, a national network,town councils and an engineering firm. e exchanges were fruitful (work seminar in Lille,joint translation into English, validation time, etc.).Technically speaking, once the questionnaire had been validated and the translations done,each partner took charge of translating the questionnaire into their own language (apartfrom Sweden who opted to go online in English) and sent it to its volunteers.3. www.copas.coop 4 5
  5. 5. 22. Respondents in the image of the volunteers: mainly girls of very diverse nationality and country of residence2.1. An average age of 23 years for the respondents 3 3. candidates: e volunteering diverse profiles (age, education, etc.) for a program that adapts e first part of the questionnaire aimed to find out the situation of the volunteers before their departure as volunteers: their age, status and> e average age of the respondents is 23 years. e youngest is 18 and the oldest 45. motives…in order to indentify how their situation had changed on their> e respondents are therefore young on the whole: nearly 70% are under 28. return.> ey replied to this questionnaire approximately two years after their return from their volunteering project. 3.1. e 20-26 age group, the majority of theWe will add that this timescale is doubly pertinent: for the volunteers the experience wassufficiently close in time for them to be able to assess it and measure the effects on their candidates… but a program that remainssituation today (development of their professional project). accessible to other age groups 67% in the 20-26 age group: an opportunity to continue their studies2.2. 75% girls > Since 2007, volunteering is open to young people between 18 and 30 years.> 75% of the respondents are girls. > e results of the questionnaire show however that this program corresponds more to the is proportion is more or less close to the ratios for the recruits of the European Voluntary 20-26 age group (67% of the respondents).Service. In point of fact, 70% on average of the volunteers are girls. We will see subsequentlyin the following pages that this percentage differs slightly according to the duration of the Frequency It will be recalled that this age group correspondsproject. mainly to the higher education class of volunteers. from 20 to less 24% For these young people, volunteering appears than 222.3. 23 different nationalities from 24 to less therefore to be a relevant program for those who 24% are preparing to enter the labour market and make> Whereas they were sent or received by 6 partners, the volunteers who replied to the than 26 choices concerning their future as adults. questionnaire are of 23 different nationalities, 7 of which are not members of the EU: from 22 to less In this sense volunteering may represent for the 19% Ukraine, Turkey, Algeria, Armenia, Belorussia and the Lebanon. than 24 young people:> e two nationalities most represented are France and Poland. Less than 20 13% > either an opportunity to consolidate a study> 95% of the respondents have only one nationality. from 26 to less choice: through the learning of languages and the 12% than 28 job experience in a sector corresponding to their2.4. 29 different countries of residence 28 and over 8% training Total 100% > a different and enriching experience before> Logically, nearly 70% of the respondents live in France or Poland. employment> As for the nationalities, the countries of residence are very varied: 29 countries, 11 of which are not members of the EU. 13% under 20: take a "break" or test out a project… 13% of the respondents were under 20 at the time of their departure. If this is obviously low compared with the higher age groups, this score should not be neglected. For these young people who have by definition not necessarily precisely determined the e key figures e lessons learnt e prospects… outlines of their project for the future (personal or professional), volunteering does not serve the same purpose. Several assumptions are possible and volunteering may represent for > 75% girls > a program used by > Promoting volunteering these young people: > 23 nationalities the young people of among boys, as an > a first approach to standing on their own feet and job experience for young people with > 29 countries of residence diverse European and initial work experience learning difficulties or without any qualifications; neighbouring countries in their professional > a means of "testing out" a professional project before engaging in higher education; > a program that acts as project > an opportunity to "take a break" after a possible first year along an unsatisfactory a melting pot for the > Making volunteering a educational path populations and enables crucial instrument for mobility the commitment of the > a program which, in the young 20% over 26: a means of mitigating the difficulties of labour market integration… way that it has been Lastly, 20% of the volunteers who replied to the questionnaire were over 26 at the time of developed, suits girls their departure. better than boys For these young adults volunteering has another purpose altogether and is apparently a possible "alternative" to: > a fruitless or interminable search for employment > a precarious and/or unsatisfactory work experience 6 7
  6. 6. 3 3> To conclude, it transpires fairly clearly that volunteering serves very different purposes e results of the survey tend moreover to validate this assumption in as far as the 25%depending upon the age of the volunteer. is diversity and this malleability are in our of volunteers with a "high school" level before their departure have dropped to only16%opinion an asset to be preserved, enabling each person, depending upon their situation, to on their return and at the same time the percentage of the volunteers having attained afind through this means an opportunity to consolidate a positive training path (continuity), university level on their return has increased (from 57% to 67%).move in another direction or find alternatives to impasse situations, etc. In other words, these 25% of young people who took on voluntary work did not abandon their education courses for all that but resumed them after the voluntary work (continuity)3.2. Volunteering, a means of consolidating 80 the training paths 70 Before departure Frequency 60 Today University or grandes écoles 57% 50 General and technical high school /vocational high school 25% 40 30 Post BAC vocational training (BTS, DUT.) 14% 20 Secondary school (BEPC level) 2% 10 Schooling / vocational training after secondary school 1% 0 (CAP, BEP) University General and technical Post BAC Schooling / Secondary school Total 100% high school / vocational training vocational training (BEPC level) vocational high school (BTS, DUT.) after secondary e average level of education of the volunteers is fairly high since 71% of the respondents school (CAP, BEP)have at least the Bac (baccalaureate - high school dipoloma).Nevertheless, 25% of the volunteers have a high school level and 2% a secondary school level. ese results back up the previous analyses pertaining to the age of the volunteers. > To conclude, it appears fairly clear that volunteering and formal education remain e relationships between volunteering and training (education) can thus take on intimately linked. Volunteering can thus play different roles: "boosting and confirming" avarious forms. study project, enabling it to be questioned in concrete terms with a view to making freshPutting educational choices to the volunteering test choices. In other words, volunteering plays a test function for those who are preparing to take up their place in society as adults.> For the 71% of volunteers with a level of education at least equal to the Baccalaureate (high school), volunteering is the opportunity to put their professional orientation choices to the test of concrete experience.> It is thus interesting to note that 41% of them change their professional orientation on their return. e assumption of the use of volunteering as a means of questioning the relevance of their higher education choices (following the wrong choice of direction or a 3.3. Two years after: the average scholastic level path that is too general or too precise) appears to be confirmed. improves On returning from your voluntary service, did you change your Without it being possible to directly attribute scholastic effects to volunteering, the results professional orientation or course of education in relation to your Frequency clearly show that the scholastic level has improved for all the volunteers. situation before going? In point of fact the table below details progress in the levels of education of the respondents NO 59% between the time they did their voluntary service and the time they filled in the questionnaire, YES 41% i.e. on average two years later. Total 100% For a great number of them, the scholastic level has improved4. > Of the young people who embarked on voluntary service with a "school, vocational training after secondary school" level, only 40% still have the same scholastic level when they replyVolunteering a "plus" for confirming choices and consolidating the professional to our questionnaire. 40% of them have a "post–Bac vocational training" level and 20%, apath "university or grandes écoles" level.> For the same 71% of volunteers with a level at least equal to the Baccalaureate, volunteering > Similarly, of the young people who embarked on voluntary service with a "Secondary is on the contrary a means of consolidating their choices. school" scholastic level, only 57% still have this scholastic level at the time of our survey.> 59% of them in fact maintained and confirmed their projects, thus backing up our second 14% have a "General and technical high school, vocational high school» level, 14% a "post– assumption that these young people use this program to complement their training course Bac vocational training" level and 14% a "university, grandes écoles" level. and/or have the benefit of experience or technical or linguistic enrichment useful for their integration in the labour market.When volunteering enables the volunteers to take a "break" or validate aprofessional orientation> Without being in the majority, 25% of the respondents have a "high school" level.> For these young people volunteering is not therefore directly linked with labour market integration. Its purpose is "preparatory": testing out their project and desires for the future through concrete experience (validating a choice of study) or allowing themselves to take some time out, a break before engaging on their higher education courses. 4. We would however like to point out that the translation into 6 languages of the scholastic levels caused a lot of hesitation on the part of the partners. We think therefore that these results, effective in the context of our survey, deserve to be gone into more deeply in the context of a more thorough study 8 9
  7. 7. 3 Secon- dary school (BEPC level) Your scholastic level before volunteering School / after secondary school (CAP, BEP) General vocational and tech- training nical high school / voca- tional high school Post-BAC vocational training (BTS, DUT.) University or grandes TOTAL écoles 3 e difference with the situation of the respondents today is on two levels: > a lesser number of students or young people in training > a bigger number of young people in stable employment > In other words, between the departure and the return from volunteering, the situation of the volunteers has changed for the better. Without being able to directly attribute this result to volunteering, there is no way of getting away from the fact that more of the people who at the time of their departure were in a precarious situation are now either in stable employment or seeking employment … Volunteering thus helps to give back young people prospects for the future which are given concrete form by orientation choices and the continuation of their studies for some and by Secondary the improving of the situation in terms of labour market integration for others. school 57% 1% Volunteering is indeed therefore a relevant program for providing support during this period (BEPC level) of life by enabling the main interested parties to make choices, set in place personal strategiese numbers in brackets correspond to the total number of volunteers in the category. School / and make plans for the future … vocational training 40% 1% 2% 1% after secondary Your scholastic level today school (CAP, BEP) General and technical 3.5. A program used more by young people from an high school / 14% 59% 4% 16% urban environment vocational high school > e majority of the volunteers who replied to the survey are "townies" (68%), living in areas Post-BAC with a wealth of services. vocational > 34% of the respondents live in towns with less than 10,000 inhabitants. 14% 40% 10% 71% 2% 14% training (BTS, DUT.) University or 14% 20% 30% 24% 98% 67% Volunteers Frequency grandes écoles over 50,000 inhabitants 154 43% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 10,000 to 50,000 inhabitants 89 25% TOTAL less than 2,000 inhabitants 56 16%5 (7) (5) (91) (51) (206) (360)() 5,000 to 10,000 inhabitants 38 11% 2,000 to 5,000 inhabitants 24 7% 3.4. An alternative when in a precarious situation TOTAL 361 100% In our survey virtually all the respondents had work experience before their departure (93%), even if for 60% of them it was only a question of “little jobs”. Volunteering is therefore not in absolute terms a "discovery of the world of work" is result has however to be correlated with the fact that the structures from which the Volunteering corresponds indeed to a period of life in which these "future adults" ask volunteers are sent are generally located in urban areas. themselves questions about their future or seek labour market integration (access to In order to diversify the geographic origin of the volunteers and in particular promote the employment remaining the prime characteristic of the casting off of youth). departure of young people from a rural environment, it would be useful to sensitise and e following pie chart shows that before their departure there were as many respondents encourage the local rural networks and structures to use and relay this program or again (43%) in training or education as in a “precarious” job situation (seeking employment, create "mobility relays" (structures or people located in rural areas and capable of directing working on a fixed-term contract or unemployed). the young people to the sending structures). in stable unemployed 7% on placement 4% 3.6. A possible way of being independent employment 7% other of their parents 2% > 60% of the respondents lived with their parents before their departure for voluntary service, employed > 39% of them were "independent" (i.e. lived on their own, in shared accommodation or as on a fixed a couple). term e volunteering program is here again once more an opportunity for young people to contract 16% experience independence from their parents and stand on their own two feet. in training or a student 5. e analysis per country reveals a distinction in the geographic origin of the respondents. us there are far more 43% young Poles from the rural areas than the other nationalities using the volunteering program (40% of the Polish respondents live in an area of less than 2,000 inhabitants compared with 0% for Spain, 6% for Slovakia and Italy, 12% for seeking employment France and Sweden). e geographic origin of the volunteers is therefore a good indication both of the geographical 20% situation of the countries (Poland is a more rural country than Spain) and the strategy of the sending structures.. 10 11
  8. 8. 33. 7. Strengthening their experience of travel and commitment e great majority of the young people (77%) who set off as volunteers had a previousexperience of travel, even if for 1 respondent in 2 this was with their parents.> Only 13% of the respondents had never travelled.> 18% of the respondents already had an experience of international voluntary service> 57% of the respondents already had an experience of local volunteering service!> Once again it is the flexibility of the program which has to be emphasised here as an 4 4. Preparing for voluntary service: the highly positive role of the sending organisations e second part of the questionnaire aimed to examine the way in which volunteering was prepared: what were the initial motives of the youngasset. e fact of having previously travelled or engaged in any action whatsoever does not people? How were the objectives of voluntary service defined? How were theconstitute a criterion for selecting the volunteers. host structures chosen?… a way of asking the volunteers to assess the sendingIndividually, volunteering is therefore a means of discovery for some, commitment for others organisations.and an experience of standing on their own two feet for all. 4.1. e "grapevine"6 and the "Internet", the main vehicles for informing and motivating the volunteers e key figures e lessons learnt e prospects > Nearly 50% of the respondents heard about volunteering from someone in their circle of family and friends who had either experienced it first hand or who knew about it. > 19% of the people questioned had heard about volunteering via the media, which e volunteers are rather If volunteering is used Promote voluntary corresponds not surprisingly to the practices of the age range targeted. young, with a high on the whole by young service for the young scholastic level, students people to consolidate people with fewer e "grapevine" and proximity therefore play a preponderant role for the volunteering or in a precarious or prepare their higher opportunities, by candidates who are in the majority people already sensitised to the usefulness of international situation education, it also developing the networks mobility. In this case the sending organisations cash in on the pre-existing motivation. > 67% aged between constitutes a chance for and the specialised On the other hand, it is also important for the sending organisations to be vigilant and 20 and 26 the young people with programs that pay special attention to the most isolated publics (little in the way of social networks, fewer opportunities to accompany them. geographical remoteness from the urban centres in which the volunteering structures, > 71% with a at least high be integrated socially and actions and information are concentrated). school level > 43% in training or work-wise. Encourage students Volunteering is therefore diversification of the 4.2. Young people motivated by the discovery of > 43% in a precarious sufficiently flexible to be able to adapt to and suit sending structures other cultures and sensitive to the idea of social in order to open up situation the diversity of situations volunteering more to commitment > 60% still live with their in which the young the young people more e volunteers who replied to our questionnaire listed their motives for going: parents people find themselves: remote from the offer. > One third of them (28%) stated that their prime motive was the "discovery of other > 68% live in an urban > In order to test out or cultures". area with services complement a training Make volunteering an > On average the determination "to perform an action of commitment" came next (19%) > 77% have already course travelled essential instrument > Lastly, the third motive was the possibility of learning a foreign language > Before embarking on a of the commitment of > 57% already have an > It should be pointed out that compared however with the first three highly "positive" dynamic of job seeking the young people when experience of local motives the fourth one was an alternative to an unfavourable employment situation. us, > In order to get starting out on their for 15% volunteering was chosen because the person "was unable to find work in their community service an experience of professional paths. country". independence when this is difficult to “Your motives” what made you decide to First Second ird Average acquire become a volunteer? choice choice choice > To take a break or gain a fresh impetus in a I couldn’t find work in my country 15% 15% 14% 15% period of uncertainty I wished to become independent 7% 10% 12% 10% or difficulties I wished to take a break 13% 9% 12% 11% I wished to perform an action of 13% 23% 20% 19% commitment I wished to discover other cultures 36% 28% 19% 28% I wished to learn/improve a foreign 10% 20% 20% 16% language Other 6% 0% 3% 3% 6. Somebody around told me.. 12 13
  9. 9. 4> To conclude, the initial motives of the volunteers concern first of all issues of socialcohesion: know better, know yourself better, be capable of exchanging through speaking thesame language and be useful.However, it would be misguided to dissociate these "social motives" from a more directlyeconomic motive which is not absent from the concerns of the respondents.Once again, volunteering through its flexibility and its opening up offers this possibility ofcombining social and economic, collective and individual motives, which is after all ratherrare in the various public program or policies, in particular those directed at young people. ese results also show that, far from the representations still often made about youth, thevolunteering candidates have a very precise knowledge of their motives and they do not jointhe mobility programs purely with the aim of travel in mind. 4 4.5. Multiple and precise objectives which remain consistent with the original motives As the results in the table below show, the respondents are conscious of and moreover assert that volunteering is an experience that encompasses several objectives of a different kind. It will be noted that these objectives match their motives (see previous part) even if they are made more explicit, indicating moreover the ability of the mobility programs to maintain this coherence. From the ranking produced following our survey, it will be noted that, > e "discovery of new lands and new cultures" remains the prime objective of volunteering (20%). It relates to social skills (adapting themselves to community life, developing social relations and also improving their knowledge of the host country, its culture, its history, etc.). > "the learning of a foreign language" whilst it was in 4th position for the motives occupies 2nd place for the objectives of volunteering. Here it is a question of dialoguing in a foreign4.3. Volunteers given support and satisfied with their language, improving their command of the language, using it, etc.). preparation > Listed 3rd in the objectives ranking, the respondents stated that the purpose of their e sending organisations have a supporting role to play for the future volunteers before volunteering was to gain in “autonomy and self-confidence”, a motive that was only placedtheir departure (this project is moreover part of a contract with the EU services). in 6th position in the motives ranking. is objective of autonomy/independence can be us, of our panel, drilled down to the personal level (organisation of the day-to-day life: travel, purchases, etc.) or the work level (in the context of the activities, tasks or projects they have to undertake,> 95% of the young people received preparation for the voluntary service from their sending the volunteer may have to take on responsibilities, organise the work of a group, prepare organisations, which virtually all of them are satisfied with. certain materials on their own, etc.).> Of these, only 6% of the respondents said they were not very satisfied or not at all satisfied > On the other hand, while the "citizen commitment" was ranked in 2nd position for motives, with the said preparation. we find it in 4th position for the objectives of volunteering.Generally speaking these results are a good indicator of the quality of the preparation workdone by the sending organisations (154 different sending structures in our survey). ishighly favourable opinion shows moreover that the volunteers recognise the "plus" providedby these bodies which goes beyond simply the technical and material preparation of the 1st 2nd 3rd Averagevoluntary service (housing, travel facilities, etc.) choice choice choice Gain in independence/autonomy and 18% 9% 14% 14%4.4. A useful preparation to specify and formalise self-confidence the objectives of the voluntary service Discover new lands and new cultures 27% 19% 13% 20% e "plus" we are talking about here refers to the contribution made by the organisation to Have a citizen/European commitment 9% 11% 8% 9%the finalising of a coherent project for the volunteers. "Preparing yourself for volunteering" Enrich my technical knowledge in my field 7% 8% 3% 6%means refining the objectives of your project, setting off with the right tools and creating theconditions so that the volunteering is fully beneficial, which is a reality for three-quarters of Learn/improve a foreign language 12% 15% 18% 15%our volunteers: Set up abroad 4% 4% 3% 4%> 72% consider that the objectives of their voluntary service were precise Opening up of new prospects> 66% say that these objectives were formalised. 2% 4% 5% 4% on the labour market Adapting to a new work context 3% 5% 8% 5% “Were the objectives of your Volunteers Frequency Testing myself before entering the labour voluntary service precise?” 3% 2% 4% 3% market YES 258 72% Defining a professional orientation 2% 3% 4% 3% NO 102 28% Total 360 100% Changing my professional orientation 1% 3% 2% 2% Integrating an international mobility experience 5% 5% 7% 6% in a defined professional path “Were the objectives of your voluntary service put down in Learning new work methods 1% 5% 4% 3% Volunteers Frequency writing, formalised (sheet, aid, Gaining experience in order to access training etc.)?” 1% 2% 3% 2% on my return YES 239 66% Testing myself out in a professional capacity 2% 4% 4% 3% NO 121 34% Replacement of military service 2% 1% 1% 1% Total 360 100% 14 15
  10. 10. 4> To conclude, it appears fairly clear that whereas the initial motive is more directedtowards social cohesion and commitment, as for the objectives of the project they are moreprecise and focused on the "plus" of the volunteer’s project with a view to improving theirsituation on the return. e host organisations play a crucial role here in raising the level ofprecision of the objectives and expectations.For the volunteers this greater precision of the objectives is fairly revealing of a moreimmediate and more utilitarian projection of volunteering. However, this focusing on theirproject and its usefulness over the short-term does not erase their initial motives. In otherwords, volunteering enables this consensus between the expression of a personal interestand the results expected over the short-term and a more social and citizen commitmentincorporated in a longer timescale. 5 5. Actions and projects of the volunteers: a fruitful experience for everyone, results attained on the whole e questionnaire also aimed to question the volunteers about what had been concretely achieved during their service whether they were short- e key figures e lessons learnt e prospects term or long-term volunteers. What type of task and project had been accomplished? In which sector? Within what type of structure and what they > 50% of the respondents e "grapevine" has a Consolidating the learnt from it over all? heard about vital role in informing dynamic role of the volunteering over the and mobilising the future sending structures 5.1. 80% of the projects are "long-term" grapevine > 20% thanks to the volunteers. e motives and which provide support for the volunteers before (between 2 and 12 months) Internet objectives at the time they set off. > e volunteering projects lasted, for 97% of the respondents, a maximum of one year. > 90% set off thanks to of departure are diverse Strengthening the > Nearly 60% of the respondents set off for between 6 and 12 months, 20% between 2 and 6 Eurepean Voluntary and are mainly linked to support funding for the months and lastly the final 20% for less than 2 months. Service issues of social cohesion. sending organisations to > In all, 80% of the projects were "Long-term" and 20% "Short term". > 95% of the volunteers e young people are enable them to help the > Whatever the duration of the project, for 90% of them, the program used was EVS, AMICUS. had the benefit of therefore conscious of young people with fewer e host countries are very varied. In our survey 55 countries which hosted the volunteers preparation before the many interests of the opportunities. replied to the questionnaire (even if France and Spain stand out from the rest, followed by setting off and 96% are program and this is why Making volunteering an Greece, Germany, Poland and Sweden). satisfied with it they commit themselves area of the Youth Policy, Lastly, the voluntary service took place for over two-thirds (over 70%) of the respondents > 72% consider that to it. whether it be local, within an association – NGO, in generally urban areas. the objectives of their e level of preparation national or European. It will be noted that the services of the local authorities host few volunteers whereas given project were precise and satisfaction of the Encouraging the sending the motives of the volunteers and the objectives of volunteering, they could find this useful. and 66% said they were volunteers underlines the organisations to invest e administrative constraints and the density of the partnership between the sending formalised remarkable work done by in quality procedures, organisations and these services would need to be examined in greater depth. e first 3 motives for the sending organisations both from the and this applies to all the management standpoint going are: countries. and from the standpoint 5.2. e short-term voluntary service (20% of the > the discovery of other cultures is preparation enables of the follow-up of projects lasting less than 2 months): an initial > performing an action of the young volunteers to specify and formalise the volunteers or the assessment of the experience of mobility adapted to the publics with commitment the objectives of their voluntary service. fewer opportunities > learning/improving a project. foreign language Let us remember here that EVS enables adaptation to diverse situations. As a general rule, the is preparation is the sending organisations use the short-term European voluntary service (from 3 weeks to two More precise, the guarantee of a coherent months) as a "first step" program, in particular for the young people with fewer opportunities first 3 objectives of and well –constructed (JAMO). volunteering are: project. > the discovery of other e short-term service volunteers: singular characteristics cultures In this survey and for the authors of this report, it was important to analyse more specifically > learning/improving a the results of the questionnaires filled in by the people who went on a short-term project. foreign language > In our panel 20% of the volunteers went on a short-term project. > gaining in autonomy > Compared with the long-term EVS, there are more boys than girls. and self-confidence > e volunteers are younger at the time of their departure (18-22 years). > Quite logically more of them live with their parents and their scholastic level is lower, since nearly 60% of them have a high school level. > Also more of them have never worked (20% as against 3% for the people who set off on a long-term project) and more of them have never had any experience of international mobility before their departure (31% as against 7% for the people on long-term projects). 16 17

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