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Future Cities Africa (FCA)
GAMA Technical Group (GTG) Meeting
12th May 2016
1. Welcome	and	introductions	- Ghana	&	London
2. Update	on	resilience.io	programme	and	forward	plans	
for	June	- Stephen	P...
resilience.ioprogramme	à July
● DFID Annual Review process – the funders. Beginning to
discuss next steps which could incl...
resilience.ioprogramme	à July
● June 2016
• 13th – 22nd June interactive modelworkshops
• Ministries – MLGRD & MWRWH, NDPC...
resilience.io platform
GAMA Technical Group
WASH SECTOR
Multiple Collaboratories
Aims and next steps
1. Collaboratory grows to cover all sectors with user friendly access
points and nominated lead for ea...
Resilience.IO Results for meeting
Water Demand in Ghana
Harry Triantafyllidis, Xiaonan Wang,
Rembrandt Koppelaar and Koen ...
Results – Use Case 1 “On-going projects”
10
Simulated Values 2010 2025
Population 3,882,567 5,678,121
Water Demand (no lea...
2015 : Existing potable water pipe connections
11
2025 : New infrastructure to meet 100%
improved water demands
12
n On-going / completed projects 2010 - 2025:
¨ Kpong Chin...
2025 : New pipes suggested to meet 100%
improved water demands
13
2025 : Water flows simulated with new
infrastructure in m3 per day (excludes leaks)
14
Results – Use Case 1 “On-going projects”
15
Simulated Values 2010 2025
Investment cost (USD)* / 954 million
Operational co...
To be continued…..
16
• Use Case Report in the works – detailed results
• June Demonstration Workshops in Accra
• Prototyp...
Urban	Resilience
And	The	Need	Of	Finance
Financing	Resilient	Infrastructure
And	Risk	Management
Webinar	for	Ghana,	May	12t...
Please	follow	me	on	my	journey	to	a	better	way	of	strengthening	
climate	resilience	with	a	focus	on	how	to	finance	it:
1. ...
1.1 Infrastructure as the growth engine of the near future?
Bloomberg,	27	February	2016:	“G-20	Seeks	Infrastructure	Push	t...
1.2 Infrastructure is a “Public Good”
Safe	water,	clean	air,	good	health,	basic	education,	green	space	etc.	cannot	be	repl...
2.1 Infrastructure & Risk Management (2)
Infrastructure	is	unique and	has	to	follow	its	specific	set	of	rules.	To	do	the	
...
2.2 Infrastructure & Risk Management (3)
Identifying,	analyzing	and	either	accepting	or	mitigating	uncertainty	in	the	
inv...
Give	the	citizen	a	word	in	it,
not	only	as	a	voter
3.2 Financing “Resilient” Infrastructure (3)
Moody’sstated	&	estimates:...
4.0 Action Plan (1)
What	we	need	to	do	now:
o Start	an	integrated planning	process	between	city &	potential	investor
o Wor...
Municipality	
and/or	Urban	
Development	
Agency
Policies
Those	are	the	societal	needs	for	hard	
&	soft	infrastructure	in	e...
4.2 Action Plan, Toolkit “Urban Development & Investment Fund”
1. Fund structure	[amounts	paid-in	&	management]	can	be	pub...
Thank you
Financing resilience.io and WASH in GAMA - GTG Webinar - May 12th 2016
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Financing resilience.io and WASH in GAMA - GTG Webinar - May 12th 2016

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The Trust
The future of the collaboratory
Discuss planning of June debut workshops and activities - identify expert users, identify needs and wishes for the interactive workshop sessions, identify particular WASH policy challenges that the Use Cases and prototype can help to inform
Update on FCA, Ghana, Cities Alliance partnership
Update on global activities
ICL IIER Team
Brief outline of early use case findings
Update on visualisations as part of the demonstration of the resilience.io prototype

Published in: Government & Nonprofit
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Financing resilience.io and WASH in GAMA - GTG Webinar - May 12th 2016

  1. 1. Future Cities Africa (FCA) GAMA Technical Group (GTG) Meeting 12th May 2016
  2. 2. 1. Welcome and introductions - Ghana & London 2. Update on resilience.io programme and forward plans for June - Stephen Passmore 3. Aims and next steps for the GAMA Technical Group – Catherine Allinson, Future Earth Ltd 4. Early use-case findings and prototype development – Rembrandt Koppelaar ICL & IIER 5. Financing resilient infrastructure (WASH) – Christoph von Waldersee 6. Guest speakers 7. AOB 8. Next steps and Close http://ecosequestrust.org/GAMA Agenda
  3. 3. resilience.ioprogramme à July ● DFID Annual Review process – the funders. Beginning to discuss next steps which could include a graphical user interface, another sector, more WASH use cases ● Engagement with ministries, assemblies, TV and Radio • June 13th – 22nd Debut events - Objectives • Evidence prototype is functional and benefits • Municipal interest in using WASH findings to inform decision making • Interest to continue to develop resilience.io - WASH, other sectors • Positive news stories on resilient city innovation
  4. 4. resilience.ioprogramme à July ● June 2016 • 13th – 22nd June interactive modelworkshops • Ministries – MLGRD & MWRWH, NDPC & MESTI • Academia – ILGS, UoG, KNUST • MMDAs, Cities, Community • Private sector • Agendas – fordiscussion • Welcome and introductions – host • Introduction to resilience.io prototype • Host presentation on value of resilience.io • Introduction to the 3 Use Cases • Findings and discussions • Interactive model run sessions (alter scenarios, parameters, assumptions) • Summarise findings • Discuss next steps and identify expert user(s)
  5. 5. resilience.io platform
  6. 6. GAMA Technical Group WASH SECTOR
  7. 7. Multiple Collaboratories
  8. 8. Aims and next steps 1. Collaboratory grows to cover all sectors with user friendly access points and nominated lead for each. It takes responsibility for M&E, reporting and dissemination of results from the resilience.io model. 2. Links to and between academic institutions are strengthened to build and share collaborative intelligence. 3. Professional networks are engaged especially with regard to project financing, apps and sustainable technologies which can be brought to GAMA 4. Use of data and information for vertical and horizontal engagement with communities and decision-makers and for creating business cases is achieved Collaboratory is seen as forum for collaborative intelligence for planning and investment decisions SUPPORT THE DEBUT WITH YOUR VOICE AND FEET 15TH – 24TH JUNE 2016
  9. 9. Resilience.IO Results for meeting Water Demand in Ghana Harry Triantafyllidis, Xiaonan Wang, Rembrandt Koppelaar and Koen H. van Dam Department of Chemical Engineering, Imperial College London, UK IIER – Institute for Integrated Economic Research 12 May 2016 Resilience.IO platform
  10. 10. Results – Use Case 1 “On-going projects” 10 Simulated Values 2010 2025 Population 3,882,567 5,678,121 Water Demand (no leaks) 346,938 m3/day 518,000 m3/day Water Losses (leaks)* 153,438 m3/day 260,983 m3/day *Assumed 27% leakage in pipe transport in 2010 & 2025
  11. 11. 2015 : Existing potable water pipe connections 11
  12. 12. 2025 : New infrastructure to meet 100% improved water demands 12 n On-going / completed projects 2010 - 2025: ¨ Kpong China Gezhouba (186,000 m3/day) ¨ Kpong Tahal (28,000 m3/day) ¨ Teshie Desalination plant (60,000 m3/day) ¨ GAMA additional boreholes (21,000 m3/day) n Model outcome à suggested: ¨ Expansion source water treatment Lake Weija (175,000 m3/day) n Potential alternative – already planned: ¨ Asutuare project at Volta River (200,000 m3/day)
  13. 13. 2025 : New pipes suggested to meet 100% improved water demands 13
  14. 14. 2025 : Water flows simulated with new infrastructure in m3 per day (excludes leaks) 14
  15. 15. Results – Use Case 1 “On-going projects” 15 Simulated Values 2010 2025 Investment cost (USD)* / 954 million Operational cost (USD) 42.6 million 81.3 million Of which simulated: - Electricity cost (USD) 1.86 million 8.7 million - Labour cost (USD) 12.8 million 17.0 million *on top of current investments in on-going projects
  16. 16. To be continued….. 16 • Use Case Report in the works – detailed results • June Demonstration Workshops in Accra • Prototype executable
  17. 17. Urban Resilience And The Need Of Finance Financing Resilient Infrastructure And Risk Management Webinar for Ghana, May 12th, 2016 By: Christoph Waldersee, The Ecological Sequestration Trust christoph.waldersee@ecosequestrust.org
  18. 18. Please follow me on my journey to a better way of strengthening climate resilience with a focus on how to finance it: 1. Tackle changing disaster risks & uncertainties 2. Enhance adaptive capacity 3. Address poverty & vulnerability and their structural causes 1.0.
  19. 19. 1.1 Infrastructure as the growth engine of the near future? Bloomberg, 27 February 2016: “G-20 Seeks Infrastructure Push to Help Boost Global Economy” http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-02-27/g-20-seeks-infrastructure-push-to-help-shore-up-global-economy o “Global finance chiefs are stepping up their call for development lenders such as the World Bank to help support economic growth by further opening the infrastructure taps” o “G-20 finance ministers and central bankers also said in the draft obtained by Bloomberg News that they’re committed to advancing investment by focusing "on infrastructure both in terms of quantity and quality aspects“.”
  20. 20. 1.2 Infrastructure is a “Public Good” Safe water, clean air, good health, basic education, green space etc. cannot be replaced. Making it stable, disaster proof & resilient, while still running & financing it follows the pattern of any other human activity: Incentives will reach more! Urban infrastructure must be resilient & sustainable as public service is a public good. But how to finance it? The political level is setting the rules The service level supplies, runs, maintains it, and has to finance it. Supply can be either a public, a private& or a community task Citizens are depending on the supply of such services and they are ready to pay but only in a transparent system allowing them to see if they can afford it We are talking about a standard of Sustainable Public & Social Well-Being Citizens need to & want to be supplied according to agreed standards The finance sector need to be involved when setting RESILIENT standards to finance this Incentivizing the finance sector through bankable projects to take this up is essential It needs to become part of a system that is putting RESILIENT as its benchmark Whoever runs the utility has principallyagreed to this public & social well-being standard the costs & potential gains balancing overall social wellbeing & economic profit (corporate or not) regarding the inclusiveness, the resilient quality & affordable price of the public service This is the practical & legal base for any cost benefit analysis as well as an integral due diligence allowing anyone to calculate the related financial cost In other words: This is the way to mobilise finance & investment turning it into bankable projects Those can be offered to the financial markets Whichever ownership, public or private sector, whichever source of finance, the utility supplier is to be judged by: KPIs made evident through data read & interpreted by a local “Collaboratory” e.g. Data Cloud
  21. 21. 2.1 Infrastructure & Risk Management (2) Infrastructure is unique and has to follow its specific set of rules. To do the respective risk management it needs to include other factors than what a corporate risk analysis assesses: Ø Infrastructure fundamentally deals with social wellbeing and inclusiveness Ø At the same time it still binds like any other investment amounts of monetary means turned into fixed or hard-to-move assets
  22. 22. 2.2 Infrastructure & Risk Management (3) Identifying, analyzing and either accepting or mitigating uncertainty in the investment decision-making process always directlydeals with the risk of social wellbeing, of inclusiveness and its consequences for human beings Ø All this needs to be counted in when quantifying potential loss and weighing it with the intended investment objectives and its overall cost, then assessing the resulting inherent risk tolerance Ø Inadequate risk management will cause consequences for human beings, for society in general, for nature or even for the planetary health
  23. 23. Give the citizen a word in it, not only as a voter 3.2 Financing “Resilient” Infrastructure (3) Moody’sstated & estimates: o “Green Bonds” worth US$50 billion are expected to be issued in 2016 o In 2015 green bonds worth US$42.4 billion were issued o India & China were expected to lead green bonds issuances o 105 issuers raised US$42.4 billion in 197 transactions in 2015, average funds per transaction around US$215 million, largest issuer raising US$17 billion
  24. 24. 4.0 Action Plan (1) What we need to do now: o Start an integrated planning process between city & potential investor o Working on the Development Finance Institutions to integrate the agreed KPIs into their project finance and make them compulsorywith the addressees (municipalities, regions, nations) o Turn the agreed KPIs into “Green” and “Resilient” standards for the due diligence for any private sector finance, in particular infrastructure o Working on institutional investors and private equity providers who are constantly seeking new investments as they all over the world start disinvesting from fossil fuels and other unsustainable ventures
  25. 25. Municipality and/or Urban Development Agency Policies Those are the societal needs for hard & soft infrastructure in each district, municipality, city e.g. Goal: Integrated strategic assessment, planning & evidence Private investment e.g. loans, equity, etc. Those are the investment needs Urban Development and Investment Fund (UDIF) Backed by e.g. GCF, AfDB, and/or by institutional investors & other investors Project pipeline (could be a PPP, or a public, or a private project, plus any innovative finance) Public investment e.g. fiscal, land, bonds Investment in cash and kind Green spaces Culture Infrastructure • One prime loan type to keep costs low • Covers full and incremental costs of projects • Long or short term finance possible • Assessments, data, modelling and M&E are bundled with funds Results: Governance & technical capacity will be much increased! Eligibility: • “Transformational change” (e.g. according to GCF requirements) • Carbon cycle management & overall GHG reduction • Overall utility reduction under any aspect of resource efficiency • Innovation, adaptation & mitigation according to resilience.io standards The tool: Urban Development & Investment Fund (UDIF)
  26. 26. 4.2 Action Plan, Toolkit “Urban Development & Investment Fund” 1. Fund structure [amounts paid-in & management] can be public, private or mixed [no need to prescribe a structure] 2. Fund revolves for an unlimited time period 3. [2-3%] Administration fee, from which management cost, royalties/fees, etc. are paid 4. One primary loan type [advisable, but not necessarily so], either at preferential interest rate or market conditions 5. Loan covers full or incremental cost [“Life Cycle Costing Calculator” acc. to “Harvard model”] 6. Soft cost/feasibility, enhanced data mapping, modeling & metering results bundled with loan 7. Primary categories determining eligibility for a loan: i. Transformational change in regard to GCF requirements ii. Carbon cycle management/GHG reduction iii. Overall utility reduction under aspects of resource efficiency iv. Innovation, adaptation & mitigation according to TEST/resilience.io standards 8. Loans & structured finance [possibly including equity] up to [xx] US$ Million will be considered 9. Projects require full feasibility study, preferably including a case study and a web story 10. Fund Review Committee meets regularly [quarterly or similar] 11. Fund policy & governance reviewed regularly [every Xth year]
  27. 27. Thank you

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