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Købmagergade 45, 2. • DK-1150 Copenhagen • falconsocial.com • welcome@falconsocial.com
Handbook
HOW TO CREATE A
SOCIAL CON...
Købmagergade 45, 2. • DK-1150 Copenhagen • falconsocial.com • welcome@falconsocial.com 2
CONTENTS
Benefits of creating a s...
Købmagergade 45, 2. • DK-1150 Copenhagen • falconsocial.com • welcome@falconsocial.com 3
“IT’S IMPORTANT THAT CONTENT IS C...
4Købmagergade 45, 2. • DK-1150 Copenhagen • falconsocial.com • welcome@falconsocial.com
BENEFITS OF CREATING A
SOCIAL CONT...
GET STARTED: DEFINE YOUR STORY
Start by defining the overarching story surrounding your brand. Often, inspiration can be t...
Købmagergade 45, 2. • DK-1150 Copenhagen • falconsocial.com • welcome@falconsocial.com 6
PURPOSE OF YOUR CONTENT.
Content ...
Købmagergade 45, 2. • DK-1150 Copenhagen • falconsocial.com • welcome@falconsocial.com 7
TONE OF VOICE.
Social media is a ...
In our work, we often find that tone of voice is taken to mean verbal tone of voice. In fact, pinning down your
visual ton...
TIP: Learn how your segmented content
performs with Facebook’s “dark”, or
unpublished posts that allow you to
promote post...
CONTENT CALENDAR
The content calendar is an overview of the content going out on social channels in the next period of tim...
Købmagergade 45, 2. • DK-1150 Copenhagen • falconsocial.com • welcome@falconsocial.com 11
TRACKING PERFORMANCE
There are t...
Købmagergade 45, 2. • DK-1150 Copenhagen • falconsocial.com • welcome@falconsocial.com 12
Content Performance: Analyse, Le...
Købmagergade 45, 2. • DK-1150 Copenhagen • falconsocial.com • welcome@falconsocial.com 13
ORGANIZING YOUR TEAM.
Creating g...
Købmagergade 45, 2. • DK-1150 Copenhagen • falconsocial.com • welcome@falconsocial.com 14
The reasons for setting up a tea...
ORGANIZATION
WHAT
WHO
HOW
Group AgencyBrand
Channels
Users
User roles
Admin Moderator Editor Team leader Content Creator
K...
Købmagergade 45, 2. • DK-1150 Copenhagen • falconsocial.com • welcome@falconsocial.com 16
SUMMARY.
Drawing upon every face...
Købmagergade 45, 2. • DK-1150 Copenhagen • falconsocial.com • welcome@falconsocial.com
 @falconsocial    falconsocial.com ...
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How to create a social content strategy for your business

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How to create a social content strategy for your business

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How to create a social content strategy for your business

  1. 1. Købmagergade 45, 2. • DK-1150 Copenhagen • falconsocial.com • welcome@falconsocial.com Handbook HOW TO CREATE A SOCIAL CONTENT STRATEGY FOR YOUR BUSINESS.
  2. 2. Købmagergade 45, 2. • DK-1150 Copenhagen • falconsocial.com • welcome@falconsocial.com 2 CONTENTS Benefits of creating a social content strategy 4 Get started: Define your story 5 Purpose of your content 6 Tone of voice 7 Content planning and creation 9 Mapping audiences 9 Content themes 9 Content calendar 10 Tracking performance 11 Organizing your team 13 Setting up your team in Falcon 14 Summary 15
  3. 3. Købmagergade 45, 2. • DK-1150 Copenhagen • falconsocial.com • welcome@falconsocial.com 3 “IT’S IMPORTANT THAT CONTENT IS CAREFULLY PLANNED OUT to ensure that you reach your objectives for social. When content is created on an ad-hoc basis, you risk communicating content that’s off-brand, or off target for your long-term objectives. Planned content promotes regular posting, and allows for a consistent workflow to maintain the quality of the content that you create. Most people working in social media have busy schedules, and benefit from routines and established workflows; great content flourishes from this consistency. “ Helle Tyllesen, Head of Customer Strategy, Falcon Social.
  4. 4. 4Købmagergade 45, 2. • DK-1150 Copenhagen • falconsocial.com • welcome@falconsocial.com BENEFITS OF CREATING A SOCIAL CONTENT STRATEGY. Determining and documenting a social content strategy guarantees that your brand is conveyed correctly and consistently over time. It’s crucial to have a strong understanding of your target audience, their needs, and most importantly, what they can gain from your content. Optimize time spent Ensure on-brand communication & content Keep daily execution in line with your objectives for social media Build a narrative around your brand Increase the amount of interactions and consumptions Track performance and improve content
  5. 5. GET STARTED: DEFINE YOUR STORY Start by defining the overarching story surrounding your brand. Often, inspiration can be taken from the mission defined in your business plan and/or social media strategy. What’s at the heart of your brand, and how are you trying to make a difference? Købmagergade 45, 2. • DK-1150 Copenhagen • falconsocial.com • welcome@falconsocial.com 5 For Nike, their mission is “To bring inspiration and innovation to every athlete”. This statement acts as a guiding rule for all their activity, including the content they distribute on social media. Once you’ve defined your mission, you need to get into more detail about what kind of content supports your overall narrative. You need to determine the pillars of content, so to speak. Define 4-5 content themes that will make up your content calendar and guide your content creation. Looking at Nike’s content, a few of their content themes could be defined as something like You vs. You, Across the Globe, and Play Anywhere. With their powerful and visually striking images imbued with mantras of “just do it” spirit, they are crafting a powerful story for their brand. Note how all themes support the overall mission. You vs. You Across the Globe Play Anywhere
  6. 6. Købmagergade 45, 2. • DK-1150 Copenhagen • falconsocial.com • welcome@falconsocial.com 6 PURPOSE OF YOUR CONTENT. Content is one of the key parts of the tool kit when working towards your long-term goals for social (along with e.g. advertising, community management and internal alignment). Content should always be aligned with the social media strategy, and with the goals you’ve defined. That is, if your overall goals for social focus on awareness and engagement, tailor your content accordingly. Creating content deliberately and thoughtfully, and giving forethought to the action you want the user to take with your content, creates targeted and powerful messages. “Good content always has an objective, it is created with intent.” Ann Handley, Author and Content Marketing Expert Examples of content purposes: • Reach - typically, these are messages designed for paid distribution • Engagement - actions like comments, likes, shares, retweets, repins, favorites etc. • Consumption - photo views, video plays, Twitter’s detail expands, Facebook’s “other post clicks” • Insight - for instance, product feedback or asking your users which kind of content they would like to see from you • Conversion - whether it be converting to fan/ follower, event sign ups, offer and promo code claims, or newsletter sign ups • Traffic to website or App Store and Google Play
  7. 7. Købmagergade 45, 2. • DK-1150 Copenhagen • falconsocial.com • welcome@falconsocial.com 7 TONE OF VOICE. Social media is a fragmented narrative consisting of atoms of content relating your brand’s story to the world. For that reason, and because your audience is bombarded with so many messages, you need to establish a clear profile. In essence, being a brand means standing out from the rest. Tone of voice is a crucial means to that end. You need to define the guidelines for how you communicate verbally on social media. To get you started, here are a few tips. • Think about the values and brand image you want to project. Which type of language supports that image? • Write down a short description of how you communicate. This could be an example: “our brand provides down-to-earth expertise and accessible inspiration on cooking and food. Our brand is not about fine dining, but the quality everyday meal that you enjoy with family and friends....” • Write a list of rules of thumb to guide your content creation. These are typically a mix of general best practice and company-specific issues. For instance, we communicate in short and simple sentences, we don’t use slang or jargon, we don’t use these particular words when talking about our products.
  8. 8. In our work, we often find that tone of voice is taken to mean verbal tone of voice. In fact, pinning down your visual tone of voice is even more important, because most social media networks prioritize visual content. Here are some tips for getting your visual tone of voice right. • Think of the brand image that you want to cultivate on social. Which values or attributes do you want to exude? Quality, Scandinavian design, retro feel? Then create visual imagery projecting these qualities. If you’re a packaged foods product wanting to project freshness and quality, create images with your product situated next to fresh ingredients to support this claim. • Use the design manual of your company to pin down details surrounding the use of fonts/weights, logo and color palette (use RGB codes, so everybody gets it right). Specify how all these aspects are to be used on social. • Speak the language of the platform. On social, it is important to be authentic and human, so be cautious with the use of commercially loaded material like stock imagery (polished photo studio feel) or POS (Point Of Sale) material - it usually doesn’t translate well. Focus on real people and situations, and authentic photos. • Guard your visual tone of voice! Don’t let the pace of your day or your workload compromise your tone of voice by choosing poor imagery. Social media is a fragmented narrative, and to stand out from the plethora of messages out there, you need a clear profile. • User-generated content often won’t meet the standards you’ve defined. If you curate content and post it on your page, determine what you are OK with, and what doesn’t meet standards and shouldn’t be widely distributed (note: this doesn’t mean you should remove pictures that users upload to your page or profile. It refers only to whether you should repost it or not). TIP: Falcon’s Content Pool helps you streamline your tone of voice. Upload stock content for future usage and to keep track of content posted in various markets or on various pages. It acts as an archive for previous content, and stock hub for future content. Essentially, it’s assets management for your social presence. Købmagergade 45, 2. • DK-1150 Copenhagen • falconsocial.com • welcome@falconsocial.com 8
  9. 9. TIP: Learn how your segmented content performs with Facebook’s “dark”, or unpublished posts that allow you to promote posts not publicly visible while testing performance. Test content on a carefully defined target group, such as non- fans that match your target group criteria. CONTENT PLANNING AND CREATION. Planning ahead is paramount in social media. As the person responsible for social media, you’re typically heavily strapped for time and wear many hats. To ensure steady flow of quality content, you need to establish tactics around executing your content strategy. The tactics consists of mapping audience segmentation, content themes, planning your content calendar, tracking performance and organizing your team. MAPPING AUDIENCES Consider segmenting your content based on the different levels of target group relationship with your brand or vertical. That is, create some content for followers/ and fans, and other content for non- fans. Both groups should always match your actual target group. Consider crafting content tailored for the different steps of the customer lifecycle, if this makes sense for your brand. CONTENT THEMES When looking at your content themes, carefully consider the type of content you will be creating. As a rule of thumb, good content is a mix of curated, creative and commercial. Depending on your brand and your position in the market, this balance should be individually defined, but be careful not to post too much commercial content, as it tends to cause audiences to lose interest. Taking our previous example, Nike’s content themes are very closely related to each other. Content themes don’t have to be abstract or conceptualized. Other examples of content themes could be Sustainability, Behind the Scenes, or Home Improvement Tips. Keep in mind, though, that the more uniquely defined your content themes are, the more your content will stand out from the rest. Købmagergade 45, 2. • DK-1150 Copenhagen • falconsocial.com • welcome@falconsocial.com 9
  10. 10. CONTENT CALENDAR The content calendar is an overview of the content going out on social channels in the next period of time. Typically, content calendars span a period of a month or two. Anything longer than that and you run the risk of posting outdated messages, so stick to a month at a time. Naturally, you should keep an eye on activities further into the future than two months, so you can properly plan the execution of campaigns and other big events, but don’t create actual updates for longer than two months at a time. When working with content, try mapping out the year in content - how many posts a week do you have, and how many pieces of content does that add up to? Most companies underestimate the time and resources necessary to keep up a steady flow of content throughout the year, so think about what you’re able to do and your dry spells throughout the year - what do you do then? You can’t plan ahead to the same extent when working with curated content, it requires more ad hoc work. But if you’ve covered your creative and commercial content in advance, you have more time to spend sourcing content. Remember your content themes and overall narrative when sourcing content. A content calendar consists of the following: • Creative: Image, text, link, video • Date and time of posting • Purpose of content • Content theme TIP: If you work in a tool like Falcon Social, you can create your content calendar within the platform. This makes it easy to collaborate on content and to hone content over time (edit and adjust). You can create drafts, send them for approval or proofreading by a team member and once they’re finished, schedule them for posting. Købmagergade 45, 2. • DK-1150 Copenhagen • falconsocial.com • welcome@falconsocial.com 10
  11. 11. Købmagergade 45, 2. • DK-1150 Copenhagen • falconsocial.com • welcome@falconsocial.com 11 TRACKING PERFORMANCE There are two sides to tracking and analytics on social media. One is to track progress and prove value (ROI), the other is to understand and learn more about your content and your community, all with the purpose of revising your approach to improve performance. Tracking top-level objectives: Measure performance and value Taking a top level look at the performance of your social media presence is key when proving the value (ROI) of social media and to track progress with your long-term social media objectives. Many companies find this to be a very elusive thing, but it doesn’t have to be. Look beyond social metrics when trying to prove the value of social. Broader digital metrics like page visits and dwell time on your website make excellent KPIs for determining volume and quality of your social media efforts. The actual metrics you want to focus on depend on your objectives and social media strategy. Here are some of our favorites: Conversions Define the various conversion targets along the sales cycle. Don’t simply think of the end goal in terms of direct revenue, but determine the value of softer targets such as event sign ups, brochure downloads, campaign offer claims etc. Quality and value of traffic For traffic generated by social media, use a web analytics tool to determine the value and quality of this traffic. How do social users compare to other types of users in terms of page views, bounce rate, session duration, conversion? You may be able to convince your boss to allocate more budget to social if he sees that conversion rates for social are twice what they are for display advertising. Traffic to website or other off-social destinations. Google Analytics already gives you data on traffic referral, but you can go much further than that with Falcon’s URL Builder to create custom URLs with tracking (UTM tags or similar). This way, you can track amount of clicks and connect traffic to your website. Reach This directly translates to the good old awareness or exposure factor. Development of community Is your fan/following count increasing, declining or remaining steady? Focus on the composition and general health of the fan group, not mere numbers acting as a vanity metric. A constant increase in fans is not necessarily the best for your brand.
  12. 12. Købmagergade 45, 2. • DK-1150 Copenhagen • falconsocial.com • welcome@falconsocial.com 12 Content Performance: Analyse, Learn, Revise...and repeat Social media changes constantly, so what worked 6 months ago when you created your social content strategy may not work today. Also, target groups are people of flesh and blood and they will defy your preconceptions of what they might like and not like. So, make sure you’re regularly looking at data to determine if you need to tweak your approach. To do so, use actionable insights and data displaying the details of content performance. Here, you’re looking at the micro level view, whereas measuring performance and value deals with the macro, big picture of your social media activity. Here are a few things to keep your eye on: • Negative feedback Facebook in particular provides excellent data on how your content is being received. People tend to focus on “positive” metrics like Likes, Comments and Shares, but this one tells it to you straight. If a substantial part of your audience chose to hide your posts, unlike your page or report your content as spam, you need to take a closer look at that piece of content. Highly popular content will always generate some negative feedback. • Consumptions Instead of placing all emphasis on interactions like comment/like/shares, you should look at consumptions. The best content doesn’t necessarily generate a lot of interactions. Often, you’d rather have them click a link to your website than like the post. Consumptions include photo view, clicks and video plays. Facebook has recently introduced detailed stats for videos (uploaded directly to Facebook), so now you can measure how long users have been watching your video, which parts of your video are particularly popular. Even more insight for you to drive action on refining your content. • Engagement This one is hardly a surprise, metrics such as favorites, likes, comments/replies, retweets, shares are still a key way to gauge performance of your content - if engagement is a key component of your social media strategy, that is. • Type/composition of post When are you seeing the best response to your content? Images, hashtags, videos, plain text or link posts? What about the length of your text? There are rules of thumbs for this, but your community might be different, so track and revise and keep doing so.
  13. 13. Købmagergade 45, 2. • DK-1150 Copenhagen • falconsocial.com • welcome@falconsocial.com 13 ORGANIZING YOUR TEAM. Creating good content requires streamlining your organization to prepare for the pace and nature of social media communication. Social media is one of the fastest forms of communication and transcends departments. For this reason, social media cannot be the sole responsibility of one department; all parts of the organization must carry a part of the load. Create a basic internal structure for social media success: • Define roles within your organization. Know who is responsible for producing content, publishing posts, approving content, and who serves as first responders in a crisis. • Within each department, appoint contact people to expedite social media requests and problems. • Set up back up contacts for illness, time off, and time zone differences, and clearly communicate the designated parties.
  14. 14. Købmagergade 45, 2. • DK-1150 Copenhagen • falconsocial.com • welcome@falconsocial.com 14 The reasons for setting up a team structure are straightforward: 1. Facilitating a fast response First, you need quick access to key stakeholders within your organization. When opportunity knocks or a crisis erupts, there’s no time to jump through the hoops of your organization’s hierarchy; you need direct access. These key departments include Legal, Marketing, PR, Product Development, IT, and Customer Service -- your stakeholders. 2. Source content Social media runs on storytelling, and the most telling content are usually those small, captured moments that show your company’s human side and personal success stories. They may not reach the Marketing, PR, or Social Media departments, or headquarters. These are customer-facing roles such as store personnel, technicians, and other people “in the trenches” - your ambassadors. 3. Communicate that social media success is a company-wide achievement If the company’s social presence is not universally and continually communicated as valuable, your organization, especially those furthest from your marketing teams, may be slow to support or contribute to your efforts. Send the message that an open and healthy company presence is useful and appreciated, by having a process for capturing staff information.
  15. 15. ORGANIZATION WHAT WHO HOW Group AgencyBrand Channels Users User roles Admin Moderator Editor Team leader Content Creator Købmagergade 45, 2. • DK-1150 Copenhagen • falconsocial.com • welcome@falconsocial.com 15 SETTING UP YOUR TEAM IN FALCON Falcon supports your team structure, whatever it looks like. Our user model is completely flexible and allows you to customize team roles. For instance, your colleague in PR could be a Team Leader on your Twitter channel where she needs to be able to respond quickly and interact with press, but only have Moderator access to Facebook.
  16. 16. Købmagergade 45, 2. • DK-1150 Copenhagen • falconsocial.com • welcome@falconsocial.com 16 SUMMARY. Drawing upon every facet of your company, your social presence can bring the best of your organization to the forefront. When there are clear directional lines between the needs of your audience and the corresponding content, it’s usually representative of a company that has distinct, functioning social goals. The actualization of good social content strategy becomes a tactical, consistent voice that your audience will recognize, and that will proactively meet their needs. This voice isn’t a bland industry message, it’s an approachable human resource that naturally points the right customers in the right direction. We hope this handbook will be of service to you in shaping your organization’s social content strategy, or in giving you some inspiration for further points of discussion. Thanks for reading! Visit our website to learn more about Falcon Social’s products and services at www.falconsocial.com Looking for extra help with social strategy and getting your organization started? Learn more about what we can offer with our Premium consulting services - please contact Helle Tyllesen, Head of Customer Strategy, at helle@falconsocial.com
  17. 17. Købmagergade 45, 2. • DK-1150 Copenhagen • falconsocial.com • welcome@falconsocial.com  @falconsocial    falconsocial.com    welcome@falconsocial.com

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