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Museum Interactive - Hat Swap

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A fun interactive slideshow which aims to gently introduce children to the concept of social class in the 19th and 20th centuries. Heavily reliant on animation - this may cause issues with viewing.

Part of our 'Ancient Investigations' series, the Hat Swap Game is aimed at children aged 3 and over, with different levels of engagement depending on the age and interest level of the visitor.

Published in: Education
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Museum Interactive - Hat Swap

  1. 1. If The Cap Fits… Welcome to Hat Swap! Choose a photo to try on different hats Click here to begin
  2. 2. If The Cap Fits… Choose a photo to try on different hats
  3. 3. This photograph of James Bryson, General Manager at Pumpherston Oil Works, was taken around 1920. More info Photograph informationLess
  4. 4. Top hats were usually worn by wealthy gentlemen. They were often made of silk. They fell out of fashion in the 20th century but are still worn for some formal occasions. Wikipedia LessPhotograph information This photograph of James Bryson, General Manager at Pumpherston Oil Works, was taken around 1920. More info Flat caps are often associated with the working classes. A law was introduced in 1571 stating that all non-noble men and boys should wear a woollen cap on Sundays. This law was repealed in 1597 but the flat cap was here to stay. Miners’ helmets were designed to protect their heads from falling rock. They often had a small lamp attached so the miner could see when he was underground. The helmet pictured is made partly from paper! Crowns are worn by royals all over the world. They represent power. If you are wearing a crown, you are probably the most powerful person in the room. The ultimate hat! Linen mob caps were worn by married women in the Georgian period, but by the Victorian era they were worn by nurses and servants. A steel police helmet issued to home guards, air raid shelter wardens and special constables during World War Two. This helmet was issued to Mr Joseph Morrison, a voluntary special constable from Livingston Station who worked at Deans Crude Oil Works. Bowler hats were created in the 1800s to protect the heads of gamekeepers from low branches. They were worn by businessmen working in finance and other respectable jobs. Bonnets were usually worn by women. They ranged from very simple caps to ornate creations with flowers, feathers and sometimes even whole birds! Back to Start
  5. 5. James “Paraffin” Young was the founder of the shale oil industry in Scotland. Learn more Photograph informationLess
  6. 6. Top hats were usually worn by wealthy gentlemen. They were often made of silk. They fell out of fashion in the 20th century but are still worn for some formal occasions. Wikipedia LessPicture information James “Paraffin” Young was the founder of the shale oil industry in Scotland. Learn more Flat caps are often associated with the working classes. A law was introduced in 1571 stating that all non- noble men and boys should wear a woollen cap on Sundays. This law was repealed in 1597 but the flat cap was here to stay. Miners’ helmets were designed to protect their heads from falling rock. They often had a small lamp attached so the miner could see when he was underground. The helmet pictured is made partly from paper! Crowns are worn by royals all over the world. They represent power. If you are wearing a crown, you are probably the most powerful person in the room. The ultimate hat! Linen mob caps were worn by married women in the Georgian period, but by the Victorian era they were worn by nurses and servants. A steel police helmet issued to home guards, air raid shelter wardens and special constables during World War Two. This helmet was issued to Mr Joseph Morrison, a voluntary special constable from Livingston Station who worked at Deans Crude Oil Works. Bowler hats were created in the 1800s to protect the heads of gamekeepers from low branches. They were worn by businessmen working in finance and other respectable jobs. Bonnets were usually worn by women. They ranged from very simple caps to ornate creations with flowers, feathers and sometimes even whole birds! Back to Start New photo
  7. 7. Portrait photograph of James Mackie, born 1896. James worked for Broxburn Oil Company Ltd at Broxburn Oil Works. Photograph informationLess
  8. 8. Top hats were usually worn by wealthy gentlemen. They were often made of silk. They fell out of fashion in the 20th century but are still worn for some formal occasions. Wikipedia LessPhotograph information Portrait photograph of James Mackie, born 1896. James worked for Broxburn Oil Company Ltd at Broxburn Oil Works. Flat caps are often associated with the working classes. A law was introduced in 1571 stating that all non- noble men and boys should wear a woollen cap on Sundays. This law was repealed in 1597 but the flat cap was here to stay. Miners’ helmets were designed to protect their heads from falling rock. They often had a small lamp attached so the miner could see when he was underground. The helmet pictured is made partly from paper! Crowns are worn by royals all over the world. They represent power. If you are wearing a crown, you are probably the most powerful person in the room. The ultimate hat! Linen mob caps were worn by married women in the Georgian period, but by the Victorian era they were worn by nurses and servants. A steel police helmet issued to home guards, air raid shelter wardens and special constables during World War Two. This helmet was issued to Mr Joseph Morrison, a voluntary special constable from Livingston Station who worked at Deans Crude Oil Works. Bowler hats were created in the 1800s to protect the heads of gamekeepers from low branches. They were worn by businessmen working in finance and other respectable jobs. Bonnets were usually worn by women. They ranged from very simple caps to ornate creations with flowers, feathers and sometimes even whole birds! Back to Start New photo
  9. 9. Photograph of Sarah Reid on the drying green outside No. 77 Stewartfield, Broxburn. Photograph informationLess
  10. 10. Top hats were usually worn by wealthy gentlemen. They were often made of silk. They fell out of fashion in the 20th century but are still worn for some formal occasions. Wikipedia LessPhotograph information Photograph of Sarah Reid on the drying green outside No. 77 Stewartfield, Broxburn. Flat caps are often associated with the working classes. A law was introduced in 1571 stating that all non- noble men and boys should wear a woollen cap on Sundays. This law was repealed in 1597 but the flat cap was here to stay. Miners’ helmets were designed to protect their heads from falling rock. They often had a small lamp attached so the miner could see when he was underground. The helmet pictured is made partly from paper! Crowns are worn by royals all over the world. They represent power. If you are wearing a crown, you are probably the most powerful person in the room. The ultimate hat! Linen mob caps were worn by married women in the Georgian period, but by the Victorian era they were worn by nurses and servants. A steel police helmet issued to home guards, air raid shelter wardens and special constables during World War Two. This helmet was issued to Mr Joseph Morrison, a voluntary special constable from Livingston Station who worked at Deans Crude Oil Works. Bowler hats were created in the 1800s to protect the heads of gamekeepers from low branches. They were worn by businessmen working in finance and other respectable jobs. Bonnets were usually worn by women. They ranged from very simple caps to ornate creations with flowers, feathers and sometimes even whole birds! Back to Start New photo
  11. 11. Photograph of Robert Thomson, who worked at Tarbrax Oil Works. Photograph informationLess
  12. 12. Top hats were usually worn by wealthy gentlemen. They were often made of silk. They fell out of fashion in the 20th century but are still worn for some formal occasions. Wikipedia LessPhotograph information Photograph of Robert Thomson, who worked at Tarbrax Oil Works. Flat caps are often associated with the working classes. A law was introduced in 1571 stating that all non- noble men and boys should wear a woollen cap on Sundays. This law was repealed in 1597 but the flat cap was here to stay. Miners’ helmets were designed to protect their heads from falling rock. They often had a small lamp attached so the miner could see when he was underground. The helmet pictured is made partly from paper! Crowns are worn by royals all over the world. They represent power. If you are wearing a crown, you are probably the most powerful person in the room. The ultimate hat! Linen mob caps were worn by married women in the Georgian period, but by the Victorian era they were worn by nurses and servants. A steel police helmet issued to home guards, air raid shelter wardens and special constables during World War Two. This helmet was issued to Mr Joseph Morrison, a voluntary special constable from Livingston Station who worked at Deans Crude Oil Works. Bowler hats were created in the 1800s to protect the heads of gamekeepers from low branches. They were worn by businessmen working in finance and other respectable jobs. Bonnets were usually worn by women. They ranged from very simple caps to ornate creations with flowers, feathers and sometimes even whole birds! Back to Start New photo
  13. 13. Portrait photograph of Walter Mackie, born circa 1894. Walter Mackie was the son of John Mackie, a shale miner from 23 Oakbank Place, Winchburgh. Walter was a shale miner who left West Lothian to continue his profession as a miner in Australia. Photograph informationLess
  14. 14. Top hats were usually worn by wealthy gentlemen. They were often made of silk. They fell out of fashion in the 20th century but are still worn for some formal occasions. Wikipedia LessPhotograph information Portrait photograph of Walter Mackie, born circa 1894. Walter Mackie was the son of John Mackie, a shale miner from 23 Oakbank Place, Winchburgh. Walter was a shale miner who left West Lothian to continue his profession as a miner in Australia. Flat caps are often associated with the working classes. A law was introduced in 1571 stating that all non- noble men and boys should wear a woollen cap on Sundays. This law was repealed in 1597 but the flat cap was here to stay. Miners’ helmets were designed to protect their heads from falling rock. They often had a small lamp attached so the miner could see when he was underground. The helmet pictured is made partly from paper! Crowns are worn by royals all over the world. They represent power. If you are wearing a crown, you are probably the most powerful person in the room. The ultimate hat! Linen mob caps were worn by married women in the Georgian period, but by the Victorian era they were worn by nurses and servants. A steel police helmet issued to home guards, air raid shelter wardens and special constables during World War Two. This helmet was issued to Mr Joseph Morrison, a voluntary special constable from Livingston Station who worked at Deans Crude Oil Works. Bowler hats were created in the 1800s to protect the heads of gamekeepers from low branches. They were worn by businessmen working in finance and other respectable jobs. Bonnets were usually worn by women. They ranged from very simple caps to ornate creations with flowers, feathers and sometimes even whole birds! Back to Start New photo
  15. 15. Photograph of David Cornelius Payne, cooper with Broxburn Oil Company Ltd, born 1840. Taken prior to 1914. Photograph informationLess
  16. 16. Top hats were usually worn by wealthy gentlemen. They were often made of silk. They fell out of fashion in the 20th century but are still worn for some formal occasions. Wikipedia LessPhotograph information Photograph of David Cornelius Payne, cooper with Broxburn Oil Company Ltd, born 1840. Taken prior to 1914. Flat caps are often associated with the working classes. A law was introduced in 1571 stating that all non- noble men and boys should wear a woollen cap on Sundays. This law was repealed in 1597 but the flat cap was here to stay. Miners’ helmets were designed to protect their heads from falling rock. They often had a small lamp attached so the miner could see when he was underground. The helmet pictured is made partly from paper! Crowns are worn by royals all over the world. They represent power. If you are wearing a crown, you are probably the most powerful person in the room. The ultimate hat! Linen mob caps were worn by married women in the Georgian period, but by the Victorian era they were worn by nurses and servants. A steel police helmet issued to home guards, air raid shelter wardens and special constables during World War Two. This helmet was issued to Mr Joseph Morrison, a voluntary special constable from Livingston Station who worked at Deans Crude Oil Works. Bowler hats were created in the 1800s to protect the heads of gamekeepers from low branches. They were worn by businessmen working in finance and other respectable jobs. Bonnets were usually worn by women. They ranged from very simple caps to ornate creations with flowers, feathers and sometimes even whole birds! Back to Start New photo
  17. 17. Photograph of young child with woman and child in the background. Taken at 14 Dean Street, Livingston Station. Photograph informationLess
  18. 18. Top hats were usually worn by wealthy gentlemen. They were often made of silk. They fell out of fashion in the 20th century but are still worn for some formal occasions. Wikipedia LessPhotograph information Photograph of young child with woman and child in the background. Taken at 14 Dean Street, Livingston Station. Flat caps are often associated with the working classes. A law was introduced in 1571 stating that all non- noble men and boys should wear a woollen cap on Sundays. This law was repealed in 1597 but the flat cap was here to stay. Miners’ helmets were designed to protect their heads from falling rock. They often had a small lamp attached so the miner could see when he was underground. The helmet pictured is made partly from paper! Crowns are worn by royals all over the world. They represent power. If you are wearing a crown, you are probably the most powerful person in the room. The ultimate hat! Linen mob caps were worn by married women in the Georgian period, but by the Victorian era they were worn by nurses and servants. A steel police helmet issued to home guards, air raid shelter wardens and special constables during World War Two. This helmet was issued to Mr Joseph Morrison, a voluntary special constable from Livingston Station who worked at Deans Crude Oil Works. Bowler hats were created in the 1800s to protect the heads of gamekeepers from low branches. They were worn by businessmen working in finance and other respectable jobs. Bonnets were usually worn by women. They ranged from very simple caps to ornate creations with flowers, feathers and sometimes even whole birds! Back to Start New photo

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