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How to Script Your Video

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Condensed from a workshop by Amy DeLouise for video producers at GVExpo.

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How to Script Your Video

  1. 1. Amy DeLouise @brandbuzz GV Expo 18 HOW TO SCRIPT: BEST PRACTICES FOR WRITING YOUR VIDEO Video examples from live presentation have been removed
  2. 2. Today  Defining Goals  The Act of Writing  Story Infrastructure  Narrative Arc  Writing Tools & Strategies  Scripting for Animation  Scripting for Interviews: Workflow from Pre-Interview to Post
  3. 3. PLANNING YOUR STORY
  4. 4. How We Learn Observation Attention Retention Reproduction Motivation Albert Bandura’s Social Learning Theory
  5. 5. How We Learn  “Narrative transportation”  Empathy  Proximity to content  Identification with characters  Emotions experienced
  6. 6. Creative Brief  Identifies goals  Audience  Scenes  Style  Schedule  Budget  Approvals
  7. 7. Develop Your Own Process  Where you write matters  When you write matters  How you write matters  Don’t start with a blank page  Creative Brief  Goals  Outline!  Writing Prompts
  8. 8. Outlining  Just do it.  Formal or informal.  Tools:  https://workflowy.com/ - for outlining  https://evernote.com/ - for compiling research  Or just use a napkin. As long as you do it!
  9. 9. STORY INFRASTRUCTURE@brandbuzz
  10. 10. Know Your Characters  Not too many  3-4 max in a 5-minute piece, 1 protagonist best  5-6 characters in long form  A company or product might be a character  Setting can also be a character  Primary character v. supporting or validators
  11. 11. Supporting Characters  “Validators” audience can relate to  Someone who can serve as narrator  An authority on the subject  Expert, physician, historian, author, etc.  Not a requirement if a strong main voice
  12. 12. Pre-Interviews Matter  Conduct by phone if possible  Record with permission  Gives you a personal connection before you meet  Gives you a sense of the narrative flow  Know the obstacles in advance  Develop asset lists and shot lists
  13. 13. Define Your Style  Doc vs Commercial  Cutty vs Deliberate  Animated vs Live Action  Re-enactments  Archival materials  Music and Audio considerations
  14. 14. Determine Setting  Location informs the story  Establishing shots and interview settings  Pro’s and Con’s of Green-screen  Example: Safety Dance  Solving an issue of setting AND characters  Achieving an educational goal
  15. 15. Define POV  Protagonist  First-person interviews  Narrator  Combo  Example
  16. 16. NARRATIVE ARC@brandbuzz
  17. 17. Story Arc 17 For nonfiction, have a plan, but be flexible!
  18. 18. Story Arc 18 The Hook and the Climax are related. (Hook hints at Climax)
  19. 19. Hook  Pulls in the viewer  Connects to the climax  Many options:  A fast-paced visual montage  An aerial shot zooming into main character  Audio without picture, setting the scene
  20. 20. Exposition  Introduce characters  Gives the back-story  Quick ramp-up for the viewer
  21. 21. Challenge  Obstacle to be overcome  For corporate…  For nonprofits…  For docs…  For a profile…
  22. 22. Climax  Turning point  Character changes his/her mind  Character takes action  Something critical changes  Hoarder decides to start unloading baggage (for ex)  Volunteer makes a decision to get involved  Drug addict decides to go into treatment  Customer purchases product and uses it for the first time
  23. 23. Conclusion  Wrap up loose ends  May contain a Call to Action  May contain an embedded link
  24. 24. SCRIPT WORKFLOW
  25. 25. Key Elements of Shooting Script  Time of Day  Locations  Scenes  Settings  Dialogue or talking points  Interstitial elements
  26. 26. Key Elements of Editing Script  Script Notes  Timecode/Transcript Selects  Time of Day timecode can help match up to shoot log  B-roll options  Interstitial elements options
  27. 27. Managing the Rewrite  When to involve  Decision-makers  Focus groups  Production team  Post team  Using goals to navigate challenges
  28. 28. Animation Workflow  Creative Brief- Story Goals, Look, Style Frames  Proof of Concept – Animated Style Frames  Keyframes Tied to Key Moments in Script  Revisions to Keyframes  Audio track locked  Animating begins
  29. 29. Interview Workflow  Conduct Pre-Interviews at least 2 wks prior to shoot  Record Pre-Interview (with permission)  Map out story arc  Reverse engineer interview questions  Consider other platforms/versions  Elicit “evergreen” answers  When and how to share your questions
  30. 30. Interview Workflow  Transcripts  Highlight best takes  Embed PDF w/footage for future needs  First draft—all in  Later drafts—delete, delete, delete  Respect interview content/tone, even when editing
  31. 31. Transcript Tools  Builder by Lumberjack (FCP)  LumberjackSystem.com/builder.html  Transcriptives (PP) $299  https://store.digitalanarchy.com/vi deoplugins/263-transcriptive.html  Speechmatics – AI - .08/min  Human Transcribers - $1-2/min  Discern accents  Recognize acronyms  Noble Transcription
  32. 32. Wrapping Up@brandbuzz
  33. 33. What We’ve Covered  Know Your Story Goals  Build Your Story Infrastructure  Create a Narrative Arc  Use Tools to Help You  Define Script-to-Screen Workflow  Have Fun!
  34. 34. www.amydelouise.com Thanks! Please tweet about @brandbuzz

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