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Planning and Layout of Garden Narender (2011A24BVIi)

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Planning and Layout of Garden Narender (2011A24BVIi)

  1. 1. SUBMITTED TO: Dr. B.S BENIWAL SUBMITTED BY:- NARENDER (2011A24BVI)
  2. 2. Garden:- A garden is a planned space, usually outdoors, set aside, and for the display, cultivation, and enjoyment of plants other forms of nature. The garden can incorporate both natural and man made materials. Gardening is the activity of growing and maintaining the garden.
  3. 3. Garden Planning The planning of a garden is an art. It may be undertaken by a professional. A landscape architect is a professional who can plan and realise outdoor spaces. The planner must give consideration to many factors:  Purpose  Existing conditions  Financial constraints  Maintenance implication
  4. 4. The landscapist should not try to imitate another garden. One has to develop one`s own design giving due consideration to the local conditions. One more mistake which is commonly made is to plant many more specimens than a garden can accommodate causing overcrowding . A good planner is one who will make best use of a site. The land with natural undulations should never be level but rather the differences in level should be utilized with advantage . Cont….
  5. 5. Steps in Landscape plan drawing While designing the garden the following fundamental steps are to be crossed:-  Meet the client  Asses his needs and analyze the site  Prepare the site analysis plan  Draw the base plan  Dream on a paper with a bubble graph or goose egg plan
  6. 6.  Establish the garden components in design and test the design.  Make the master plan.  Choosing the plants to each component.  Trace the plan on vellum or use the computer software to make it in the paper.  Label the plan.  Price the plan. Cont…………..
  7. 7. Draw the base plan Before start adding wonderful new landscape features it is vital to prepare a map denoting the already existing features. For that taking measurements may should like a pain in the neck, but it will give idea about estimates for what this new design is actually going to cost. Without measurements, it is tough to have idea about how much concrete ,wood , chips, top soil, bricks, groundcover ,plants ,or other material that the design requires. Correct measurements eliminate guesswork and give confidence on the plant.
  8. 8. Elements of a Garden The elements of a garden consists of natural conditions and materials, as well as man made elements : Natural conditions and materials :  Soil  Rocks  Light conditions  Wind  Precipitation  Air quality - pollution - proximity to ocean(salinity)
  9. 9. Man made elements;  Terrace, patio, deck  Paths  Lighting  Raised beds  Outdoor arts /sculpture  Pool, water garden or other water elements Cont………..
  10. 10. Steps for Garden Planning 1. Check the zone map:-climate is the dominating factor in the plant growth. over 50% of growth and development of your plant crop is determined by climate.so it just makes sense to take time up front to select the right plants for your particular climate . 2. Determine the growing seasons :-Take note of the buildings and tress that may block areas of your yard. Estimate where the sun is going to be tracking across your yard during growing
  11. 11. season and plan accordingly place the shade loving plants in the path that gets shaded at the hottest time of the day and place the sun loving plants where they will receive the most sun possible .This will help ensure that all plants reach their optimum potential. Cont…………
  12. 12. Make a Drawing  A good scale drawing will give you an idea of how much seed to buy and how many plants you can cram into the space.  Draw any trees, buildings that might cast shade(to the sunlight loving plant), low or high spots and anything special about the site.  There are computer software programmes for home landscape design that may be helpful here.
  13. 13.  In a big garden it’s useful to break it down into sections. One for the herbs, one for annuals, one for the white flowers, you get the idea, anything that seems logical to you.  Put the big heavy sunflowers closer to home.  Put the ones that need a lot of attention and extra water close to the house outlet. You can use a row of tall plants like sunflowers to shade a row just beside it, a form of companion planting. Cont…………
  14. 14. Bedding Plants  For many home gardeners bedding plants are natural choice when planting their gardens.  Here are the steps to follow when starting bedding plants from seed. On the other hand if you have neither the desire, space, or time to start from scratch here are a few tips for purchasing bedding plants. Bedding plants are considered best to buy if they are still blooming. Select plants that are suitable to the selected site.
  15. 15. Most garden centres will list the specific exposure, soil and cultural requirements for a variety of plants. In the absence of signs with this information , read the tag on each variety.  Prepare the soil well before you plant, the structure of either clay or sandy soil type can be changed by adding organic matter such as Canadian sphagnum peat moss, well rotted manure or garden compost. Cont………..
  16. 16. Commercially bought bedding plants usually have a complete interlocking root system in their pot. If you transplant the entire pot, including the soil you may encounter serious moisture problems with the roots. It is better to clean away some of the soil, without hurting any of the roots, and planting into prepared soil of your own. Water your plants immediately after transplanting them and daily until they have become established. Cont………..
  17. 17. Plant Spacing  The best spacing will give the plants all the conditions they need to fully develop, and to fill in completely in between plants and down the rows, leaving just enough room for you to walk along and pick you harvest.  Ideally they’d all be at waist height too so we won’t have to bend over. Antirrhinum
  18. 18.  So much crowding is not useful. Efficient use of space, is however good, and if you can add extra inputs like fertilizers and water, then you can increase the yield on that given piece of garden.  Try planting in beds of 5 or 6 rows close together to make a span about 4 feet , that can be reached easily from either side and no wasted space between the rows. The beds can be spaced apart for walking and working room. Cont…………..
  19. 19. Placing of Perennials  For ease of cultivation, especially year end clean up, consider placing the perennials wide enough apart so that you can use rototiller between the rows.  Fill in these large spaces with annuals that can be tilled in.  Try putting the perennials around the edges and away from main area so you will have large open area to cultivate in the fall rather than a whole bunch of small rows or blocks.  Just for look it’s usually better to put perennials in group rather than single plants spaced far apart or rows of single plants.
  20. 20. Companions  Usually it refers to planting certain species together as a natural pesticide, fertilizer or the other benefits.  The strong smell of marigold keeps many insects at a distance.  This is not full proof, but may reduce the numbers. It looks nice too.
  21. 21.  Beans add nitrogen to the soil , so they can be planted in any area that had heavy use of year before , like where the sunflowers or the corn was.  Sunflower and squash seem to like each-other, the squash shades the roots of the sunflowers, the sunflower shades the leaves of squash, and they fill up all the space, high up and along the ground for efficient use of the square feet.
  22. 22. Orientation  There’s much discussion about north/south rows verses east/west rows.  You need to consider whether you want to catch the late afternoon hot sun on your squash, or do you want to shade the lettuce with a row of sunflowers on south side of them.
  23. 23. Structures  You may want to extend the season by using hot caps or tunnels in the early spring and again in the fall. You can also use shade tunnels, or add extra heat to the pepper or even cantaloupe with the same tunnels covered in white cloth instead of clear poly.  For warming up crops always use two layers of poly, it’s the air space between the layers that provides the insulation.  When you plant your rows you might want to make them the same size as your tunnels.
  24. 24. Hogs  Some plants are just pushy. Squash plants take up a lot of room, so plant them at the edge of the garden where they can spread out.  Sunflowers use a lot of water in the soil and create a lot of shade. Give them room to flourish.
  25. 25. Additional Planning Hints  Plan the garden on paper first. Draw a map showing arrangement and spacing of plants.  If you wish to keep the garden growing all the season, you may need a spring, summer and fall garden plan.  Plan the garden and order seeds by January or February . Some plants may be started indoors as early as January.  In your plan place the tall and trellised crops on the north side of the garden so they will not shade the small plants.  Place perennial plants to the side of the garden where they will not be disturbed by annual tillage.
  26. 26.  Pyramidal forms direct the eyes upward, so use sparingly. Grouping pyramidal will soften the upward influence. They will look more natural in the surroundings with foliage to the ground.
  27. 27. Balance is Equilibrium on Left and Right Sides. Formal balance repeats the same left and right, giving stability, stateliness, and dignity. It is high maintenance keep both side similar. Informal balance differs from left to right giving curiosity, movement, and feels alive. Total mass of plants need to balance left and right.
  28. 28. Formal balance (left) and informal balance (right).
  29. 29. Ornamental grass often adds emphasis to a garden spot.
  30. 30. Cont………..  With flower beds, angled corners and intricate designed should be avoided and where they are on lawns they should have the longer sides parallel with the side of the lawn, with at least 2 feet of grass between to allow easy mowing.  Grass paths should be at least 5 to 10 feet wide.  Herbaceous borders should have a graceful swinging curve at the front rather than a series of small serrations, and should be at least 6 feet deep.
  31. 31. LAYOUT OF GARDEN
  32. 32. Layout of Garden  The layout should be as simple as possible ,consistent with achieving the desired effects.  A complicated layout may look attractive on paper ,but when the garden has become a reality, results are likely to be disappointing , particularly if the plants become overcrowded. A rough plan should be prepared with the boundaries of the plot , the house and any other permanent features plainly marked on it. The intended plant layout should then be sketched in, bearing in mind the forgoing points, but disregarding detail at this stage.
  33. 33. Cont………………  In doing this it should be kept in mind that if the land has to be levelled and the garden is a long one , it may be necessary to have several tiers with a drop in level between each one, and the plan must accommodate this.  It is always advisable to have a levelled terrace where one can sit and relax and sunbathe. Such a terrace should be at least 12 feet wide.
  34. 34. 1. Efficient utilization of available space. 2. To ensure that work proceeds from one point to another point without any delay. 3. Provide enough production capacity. 4. Reduce material handling costs. 5. Reduce hazards to personnel. 6. Utilize labor efficiently 7. Increase employee moral. Objectives of Layout
  35. 35. Layout of different gardens Italian garden
  36. 36. • Geometrical patterned beds , or patterres are a distinct element of Italian style. • Traditionally , Italian garden had few flowers. • Display and backdrop for sculpture. • Contrast of sun and shades. • Water features • Green being dominant color of the Italian garden. FEATURES …
  37. 37. 1. Significant use of rectilinear layouts are made within the walled enclosures. 2. Typical features include pools, fountains and canals inside the gardens.
  38. 38. 3. Had handsome walls and great gateways. 4. Most important feature of Mughal garden is Char Bagh planning.
  39. 39. •The Persian gardens are planted with different types of fruit, flower trees, shrubs, shady plants, etc. • The irrigation canals are also planted in the gardens. • The canals were planted straight to provide water to the plants which were also planted straight along the canals. •The Persian garden style spread eastwards to India and westwards via Spain with the spread of Islam and by the Romans. AMALGAMATION OF THE GARDENS AND CANALS
  40. 40. Elements of Persian Gardens  The important Persian garden elements are sunlight, shade, water, buildings.  These elements provide relaxation in different manners such as spiritual, leisurely (e.g. meetings with friends) etc. which is the primary aim of Persian garden which is considered as a paradise on earth.  The Persian gardens often connect internal yard gardens with the surrounding outward gardens.
  41. 41. Japanese garden
  42. 42. Elementsof Japanese garden  Stone lanterns  Sculptures  Stone wash basin  Kio fishes  Bridges  Pathways  Ponds  Stepping stones  Water falls  Hills  Tea houes
  43. 43. Rose garden
  44. 44. Private garden
  45. 45. SOME FAMOUS GARDEN OF INDIA
  46. 46. LALBAGH,BANGLORE(KARNATAKA)  Lalbagh is the Karnataka state botanical garden situated at Bangalore.  The most attractive features of the garden is a large glasshouse where the annual flower shows are held.  Free style of garden.
  47. 47. LALBAGH
  48. 48. BRINDAVAN GARDEN Situated in Mysore.(Karnataka) Biggest formal garden. The garden is famous mainly for its illuminated running water and innumerable fountains decorated by colored lightings.
  49. 49. BRINDAVAN GARDEN
  50. 50. BOTANIC GARDEN Coimbatore(TN)  Situated on the campus of Tamil Nadu Agricultural University.
  51. 51. The Indian Botanic Garden  Situated in Sibpur Culcutta.  The feature which attracts most visitors first is the giant 200-year-old banyan tree.
  52. 52. The AGRI-HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY GARDEN CULCUTTA (WEST BANGAL)
  53. 53. LLYOD BOTANIC GARDEN DARJEELING(WB)  Has a total area of 24 hectares.
  54. 54. NATIONAL BOTANICAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE, LUCKNOW(UP)  Popularly known as Sikander Bagh.  Present area of garden is 27 hectares.
  55. 55. HORTICULTURAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE, SAHARANPUR (U.P)
  56. 56. RASHTRAPATI BHAVAN GARDEN, New Delhi  This garden is popularly referred as Mughal Garden.
  57. 57. BOTANICAL GARDEN,FRI, DEHRADUN(U.P)  The garden has a herbarium containing 300,000 sheets.
  58. 58. MUGHAL GARDEN OF KASHMIR
  59. 59. The MUGHAL GARDEN,PINJORE (HARYANA)
  60. 60. CHANDIGARH ROSE GARDEN
  61. 61. MANDOR GARDEN,JODHPUR (RAJASTHAN)
  62. 62. SAYAJI PARK,BARODA(GUJARAT)

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