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[WEBINAR] Disciplined and Disconnected: Insights about Exclusionary Discipline from Youth and School Leaders

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Do harsh disciplinary practices have a place in today’s schools? Suspending and expelling students detrimentally affects their chances to graduate – and ultimately affects their chances of securing employment and succeeding in life.

New research from the Center for Promise—Disciplined and Disconnected: How Students Experience Exclusionary Discipline in Minnesota and the Promise of Non-Exclusionary Alternatives—answers these questions.

In this webinar, you will learn more about the findings of the CFP's latest research, the broader national implications for policy and practice of these findings, and the kind of support adults need to implement more effective practices that do not lead to further disconnection.

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[WEBINAR] Disciplined and Disconnected: Insights about Exclusionary Discipline from Youth and School Leaders

  1. 1. www.GradNation.org | #GradNation | gradnation90@americaspromise.org Disciplined and Disconnected: The Experience of Exclusionary Discipline and the Promise of Alternatives Wednesday, July 11, 2018 1:30 PM – 2:30 PM EST
  2. 2. www.GradNation.org | #GradNation | gradnation90@americaspromise.org • Welcome and Webinar Overview • Introduction to GradNation and State Activation • National Trends in School Discipline • Research Findings • Moderated Panel Discussion • Questions & Answers • Closing Agenda
  3. 3. www.GradNation.org | #GradNation | gradnation90@americaspromise.org Accelerate progress to a 90 percent high school graduation rate
  4. 4. www.GradNation.org | #GradNation | gradnation90@americaspromise.org Use Quality Data Provide a Framework of Supports Increase Mentoring Recover and Re-engage Youth Replace Punitive Discipline Make Transportation Available Create Alternative Pathways Seven Priority Recommendations Minnesota Alliance With Youth
  5. 5. www.GradNation.org | #GradNation | gradnation90@americaspromise.org Stacy Skelly Vice President, Corporate Affairs Pearson Pearson Welcome
  6. 6. www.GradNation.org | #GradNation | gradnation90@americaspromise.org Alyssa Rafa Policy Analyst, Education Commission of the States National Trends in School Discipline
  7. 7. NATIONAL PERSPECTIVE: ALTERNATIVE SCHOOL DISCIPLINE STRATEGIES July 11, 2018 Alyssa Rafa, Policy Analyst
  8. 8. • Civil Rights Data Collection • Discipline disparities • Race • Gender • Disability Status • Research on Exclusionary Discipline • Student performance • Criminal justice involvement • Economic impact Exclusionary Discipline Data & Research
  9. 9. Emerging Alternative Strategies Well-implemented alternative strategies, including PBIS, restorative and trauma-informed practices may: Academic Engagement Student Behavior School Climate Exclusionary Discipline
  10. 10. State Policy Action 2017 Proposed Legislation SUSPENSION/EXPULSION ALTERNATIVE SCHOOL DISCIPLINE STRATEGIES BOTH WA OR CA MT ID NV AZ UT WY CO NM TX OK KS NE SD ND MN IA MO AR LA MS AL GA FL SC TN NC IL WI MI OH IN KY WV VA PA NY ME VT NH NJ DE MD Washington D.C. MA CT RI AK HI
  11. 11. • Professional Development & Training for Educators • Utah HB 460 (2016) • Encouraging the use of PBIS, Restorative & Trauma-Informed Practices • California AB 1014 (2016) • Study Committees • Maryland HB 1287 (2017) Alternative School Discipline Strategies
  12. 12. Contact us! Alyssa Rafa arafa@ecs.org www.ecs.org
  13. 13. • ECS 50-State Comparison Coming Soon! • ECS Policy Snapshots • Suspension & Expulsion • Alternative School Discipline Strategies • National Clearinghouse on Supportive School Discipline • Council of State Governments Justice Center • UCLA Civil Rights Project Resources
  14. 14. Elizabeth Pufall- Jones Research Scientist, Center for Promise Disciplined and Disconnected: How Students Experience Exclusionary Discipline in Minnesota and the Promise of Non-exclusionary Alternatives
  15. 15. www.GradNation.org | #GradNation | gradnation90@americaspromise.org  Traditional systems emphasize student removal as a primary approach to managing behavior.  Students who are removed from school are less likely to graduate which threatens their ability to succeed later in life.  Very little is known about how students experience school discipline. Rationale
  16. 16. www.GradNation.org | #GradNation | gradnation90@americaspromise.org Student Behavior Through a Positive Youth Development Lens
  17. 17. www.GradNation.org | #GradNation | gradnation90@americaspromise.org Primer on Exclusionary Discipline Removing a student from class or school entirely in response to their behavior is called “exclusionary discipline.” Exclusionary discipline does not make schools safer and is associated with an array of negative outcomes for young people:  Worse academic performance  Lower levels of school engagement  Greater chance of leaving school before graduating  Increased likelihood of future involvement with the criminal justice system  Higher levels of school violence and antisocial behavior
  18. 18. www.GradNation.org | #GradNation | gradnation90@americaspromise.org Discipline in Minnesota MN on time graduation rates, 2015 All students: 84% Native American: 56% White: 88% Hispanic: 69% Asian-American: 86% Black: 68%
  19. 19. www.GradNation.org | #GradNation | gradnation90@americaspromise.org Study Overview Our Approach  In depth group interviews  38 Minnesota middle and high school students  Individual interviews with administrators  3 sites across Minnesota: Chisago, Minneapolis, St. Paul  Open coded interview transcripts for common themes Overview and Goals  Understand students’ experiences of exclusionary discipline  Understand educator experiences implementing supportive disciplinary approaches
  20. 20. www.GradNation.org | #GradNation | gradnation90@americaspromise.org Findings Root causes of behavior must be explored and addressed Exclusion interrupts learning Students need to feel valued, welcome, and connected • Behavior doesn’t occur in a vacuum • Students wanted to share and get supports to address the root causes of their behavior • Exclusion took students away from class, making it more difficult to make academic progress • Youth explained that they want to succeed in school, which is why exclusion was especially painful for them • Youth explained that their perspectives aren’t valued • Racism and other forms of negative labeling led students to feel unwelcome and unvalued “…since this year, they start talking smack about my mom, saying that, oh, she’s not worth it, she’s this and that, she’s a whore... Yeah, my mom is not a perfect mom, but it’s because she’s been through a lot… I took that super serious, ‘cause it’s my mom. If y’all talking smack about me, yeah, I’m cool with that, but my mom, I won’t let it happen.” “Why do they make you go to court during school for missing school? And I got truancies for the days that I missed for going to court, too.” “All you got to do is to get suspended one time and you’re labeled. I see it, like they follow the same kids around, like everybody knows, ‘Hey, those are the bad kids…’ “
  21. 21. www.GradNation.org | #GradNation | gradnation90@americaspromise.org Insights from School Leaders “We’ve got to change what we’re doing because what we did before isn’t working.” Make student learning the ultimate goal Interpret behavior as a communication of needs Build trusting relationships Share power
  22. 22. www.GradNation.org | #GradNation | gradnation90@americaspromise.org Considerations for Policy & Practice  Strengthen relationships among school personnel, students, and families.  Allow disciplinary action to provide an opportunity for conversation  Create learning communities for educators and school leaders to discuss effective strategies for lowering the rate of school exclusion.  Support district exploration of non-exclusionary discipline practices.
  23. 23. www.GradNation.org | #GradNation | gradnation90@americaspromise.org “For us it’s about keeping kids in school, keeping kids connected, because we all know the research. The more connected a kid is, the better they do.”
  24. 24. www.GradNation.org | #GradNation | gradnation90@americaspromise.org Moderated by Monika Kincheloe Senior Director, Strategic Initiatives and Partnerships, America’s Promise Alliance Moderated Panel Discussion Elizabeth Pufall-Jones Research Scientist, Center for Promise Alyssa Rafa Policy Analyst Education Commission of the States Cindy Everling Student Support Services Coordinator, Minnesota Internship Center Charter High School Donavyn Robinson Recent High School Graduate
  25. 25. www.GradNation.org | #GradNation | gradnation90@americaspromise.org Moving Away from Exclusion Approach Concept Outcomes Restorative Practices (RP) Emphasis is on identifying harm, undoing harm, and restoring damaged relationships • Improved academic performance • Fewer suspensions, referrals • Improved school climate ratings • Increased trust between teachers and students School-Wide Positive Behavioral Intervention Systems (SWPBIS) Promote positive behavior through school-wide behavioral expectations • Increased reading proficiency • Fewer referrals • Increased school safety ratings • Reduced student aggression Social Emotional Learning (SEL) Learning how to understand and self-regulate emotions and behavior, empathize, and build positive relationships • Improved academic outcomes • Higher rates of school attachment • Reduced student aggression There are three leading non-exclusionary approaches:
  26. 26. www.GradNation.org | #GradNation | gradnation90@americaspromise.org Questions and Answers
  27. 27. Download report: http://gradnation.americaspromise.org/ disciplined-and-disconnected www.AmericasPromise.org | GradNation.AmericasPromise.org @americaspromise

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