AWS re:Invent 2016: Busting the Myth of Vendor Lock-In: How D2L Embraced the Lock and Opened the Cage (ARC318)

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When D2L first moved to the cloud, we were concerned about being locked-in to one cloud provider. We were compelled to explore the opportunities of the cloud, so we overcame our perceived risk, and turned it into an opportunity by self-rolling tools and avoiding AWS native services. In this session, you learn how D2L tried to bypass the lock but eventually embraced it and opened the cage. Avoiding AWS native tooling and pure lifts of enterprise architecture caused a drastic inflation of costs. Learn how we shifted away from a self-rolled "lift" into an efficient and effective "shift" while prioritizing cost, client safety, AND speed of development. Learn from D2L's successes and missteps, and convert your own enterprise systems into the cloud both through native cloud births and enterprise conversions. This session discusses D2L’s use of Amazon EC2 (with a guest appearance by Reserved Instances), Elastic Load Balancing, Amazon EBS, Amazon DynamoDB, Amazon S3, AWS CloudFormation, AWS CloudTrail, Amazon CloudFront, AWS Marketplace, Amazon Route 53, AWS Elastic Beanstalk, and Amazon ElastiCache.

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AWS re:Invent 2016: Busting the Myth of Vendor Lock-In: How D2L Embraced the Lock and Opened the Cage (ARC318)

  1. 1. © 2016, Amazon Web Services, Inc. or its Affiliates. All rights reserved. November 30, 2016 Busting the Myth of Vendor Lock-In How D2L Embraced the Lock and Opened the Cage ARC318 Ben Snively (AWS) Stephen S. Skrzydlo and Stan Przychodzki Stephen.Skrzydlo@D2L.com Stan.Przychodzki@D2L.com
  2. 2. What to Expect from the Session AWS cloud
  3. 3. The Basics Amazon EC2 Who’s afraid of Amazon EC2?
  4. 4. Usage Curve
  5. 5. Usage Curve – Self-Hosting Provisioning
  6. 6. Usage Curve – Reserved Instances Amazon EC2
  7. 7. Why is no one afraid of EC2? Virtualization already paved that road We’re not afraid of what we’re used to Amazon EC2
  8. 8. D2L shops at the Content Store Don’t forget the tax
  9. 9. Round 1: DFSR • At least 2 windows • Each with 12 TB of • Cost curve looks familiar • High minimum • Step function Amazon EBS instances $- $5,000 $10,000 $15,000 $20,000 $25,000 $30,000 $35,000 $40,000 $45,000 $50,000 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 110 120 130 140 150 160 170 180 190 200 MonthlyCost TB Storage
  10. 10. Round 2: NetApp ONTAP • At least 2 ONTAP • Each with 50 TB of • Cost curve is better but… • Still a step function! Amazon EBS instances $- $5,000 $10,000 $15,000 $20,000 $25,000 $30,000 $35,000 $40,000 $45,000 $50,000 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 110 120 130 140 150 160 170 180 190 200 MonthlyCost TB Storage
  11. 11. Round 3: S3 • Standard storage • Bye-bye step function • But… that’s not a CIFS share, we’d need to change our product! Amazon S3 bucket $- $5,000 $10,000 $15,000 $20,000 $25,000 $30,000 $35,000 $40,000 $45,000 $50,000 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 110 120 130 140 150 160 170 180 190 MonthlyCost TB Storage
  12. 12. The dreaded Vendor Lock-in And here we see it, changing the code to handle S3 instead of CIFS shares. Think of the poor developers! Yes, let’s think of them… Math time! ROI = <Estimated Cost of Dev Effort> --------------------------------------------------------------------- (<OpExold> - <OpExnew>) (Watch your units)
  13. 13. $- $5,000 $10,000 $15,000 $20,000 $25,000 $30,000 $35,000 $40,000 $45,000 $50,000 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 110 120 130 140 150 160 170 180 190 MonthlyCost TB Storage Why not EFS? Doesn’t meet our needs Costs more Amazon EFS
  14. 14. Don’t compete outside your core competency Amazon Route 53 DNS and Caching Amazon ElastiCache
  15. 15. DNS “Transforming the way the world learns” Not: “implementing DNS” Amazon Route 53 $ Number of domains
  16. 16. DNS “Transforming the way the world learns” Not: “implementing DNS” Amazon Route 53 $ Number of domains
  17. 17. Caching “Transforming the way the world learns” Not: “re-implementing Memcached” Amazon ElastiCache $- $1,000 $2,000 $3,000 $4,000 $5,000 $6,000 $7,000 $8,000 $9,000 Number of instances
  18. 18. Scaling and Opportunity Cost If D2L were to have 1 DNS specialist that would be like Amazon having Classic Build vs. Buy pattern Better integration into the rest of the ecosystem Just superior feature sets
  19. 19. The Cloud is NOT a Hosting Facility in the Sky Logging Errors Amazon Kinesis Firehose Amazon Kinesis Amazon Elasticsearch Service
  20. 20. SQL as a Logging Database – Legacy Design • Unpleasant to search • Only 30 days retained • Hardcoded sharding • Costly 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 500 550 600 650 700 750 800 850 900 950 1000 $ TB
  21. 21. Kinesis Firehose -> Elasticsearch (with S3) • Designed for search • 12 months retained • Could retain more • Sharding by choice • Cheaper (~1/4th the cost) 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 500 550 600 650 700 750 800 850 900 950 1000 $ TB Amazon Kinesis Firehose Amazon Elasticsearch Service Amazon S3
  22. 22. PaaS GOOD IaaS BAD Big Data Lessons Amazon Redshift Amazon EMR
  23. 23. Original “Hosted” Design • Pure self-roll • Self-hosted • Very high floor costs • Concerns over multiregion requirements • IaaS $ Time
  24. 24. AWS “Lifted” Design – In Theory • Pure self-roll • AWS hosted • Much better floor costs • Concern over crossover point • IaaS $ Time
  25. 25. AWS “Lifted” Design – In Practice • Self-roll • AWS hosted • Much better floor costs • Concern over crossover point • IaaS $ Time
  26. 26. AWS Native Design • AWS native • AWS hosted • Jump in with both feet • Crossover point becomes hilarious • PaaS $ Time Amazon EMR Amazon Redshift
  27. 27. People OPPORTUNITY COST
  28. 28. “Understand motivations” 3rd Party Pushback
  29. 29. People
  30. 30. Recap • Who’s afraid of EC2? • Don’t forget to account for all costs • Don’t compete outside your core competency • The cloud is not a Hosting Facility in the Sky • PaaS > IaaS • This AWS thing might stick around for a bit
  31. 31. Integrating AWS with existing On-Prem Solutions
  32. 32. Integrated networking Integrated access control Integrated storage and backups Integrated Management # 10.0.100.0 # 10.0.200.0 Microsoft Active Directory, OTKA, Shib, Etc.. App 1 AWS Storage Gateway Integrating AWS with existing On-Prem Infrastructure …
  33. 33. Amazon EFS File Amazon EBS Amazon EC2 Instance Store Block Amazon S3 Amazon Glacier Object Data Transfer AWS Direct Connect AWS Snowball ISV Connectors Amazon Kinesis Firehose S3 Transfer Acceleration AWS Storage Gateway Storage is a platform: AWS Storage Maturity
  34. 34. AWS Database Migration Service Start your first migration in 10 minutes or less Keep your apps running during the migration Replicate within, to, or from Amazon EC2 or Amazon RDS Move data to the same or different database engineAWS Schema Conversion Tool
  35. 35. AWS Application Discovery Service Identify application Inventory Map application dependencies Baseline system and process performance Automate data center application discovery
  36. 36. AWS Server Migration Service • Support VMWare VMs migration • Agentless VM Migration • Capture incremental changes • Migrate a group of VMs • Management Console/API Access • Launch EC2 instances from AMIs
  37. 37. Thank you! Ben Snively (AWS) snivelyb@amazon.com Stephen S. Skrzydlo and Stan Przychodzki Stephen.Skrzydlo@D2L.com Stan.Przychodzki@D2L.com
  38. 38. Remember to complete your evaluations!

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